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General 
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General Information 

and College of Arts and Sciences 

BULLETIN 

THE UNIVERSITY 
OF GEORGIA 

ATHENS 



OLUME XL MAY, 1940 NUMBER 6 



CALENDAR 1940-1941 



September 20: 
September 21-25: 

September 23-25: 

September 25: 
September 26: 
October 30: 
November 1: 
November 21: 
December 2-5: 
December 14: 
December 16-19: 
December 20: 



PALL QUARTER 

Freshmen report 

Freshman week for orientation, registration, and 

placement tests 
Registration for upperclassmen (9 to 1 and 2:30 to 

5:30 each day except September 25 — 9 to 11:30) 
Opening exercises for 140th session 
Classes begin for all students 
Honors Day 
Freshman reports due 
Thanksgiving holiday 
Prescheduling for the Winter Quarter 
Last day of Fall Quarter classes 
Examinations for the Fall Quarter 
Christmas vacation begins 



WINTER QUARTER 

January 2: Registration for Winter Quarter 

January 3: Classes begin 

January 13: Last day for submission of subjects and outlines of 

theses by graduate students 

February 8: Freshman reports due 

February 24-27: Prescheduling for the Spring Quarter 

March 11: Last day of Winter Quarter classes 

March 12-15: Examinations for the Winter Quarter 

March 16-18: Spring recess 

SPRING QUARTER 

March 19: Registration 

March 20: Classes begin 

May 12: Last day on which theses may be approved 

May 12-30: Prescheduling of classes for the 1941-42 session 

May 30 : Last day of classes 

May 30-June 1 : Commencement week-end 

May 31: Alumni Day 

May 31: Graduation Exercises, 7 p. m. 

June 1: Baccalaureate Sermon 

June 2-5: Examinations for Spring Quarter 



SUMMER QUARTER, 1941 

June 11: Registration for First Term 

June 12: Classes begin 

July 17-18: Examinations for First Term 

July 19: Registration for Second Term 

July 21: Classes begin 

August 21-22: Examinations for Second Term 

August 22: Commencement exercises for Summer Quarter 



General Information 

and College of Arts and Sciences 



* THE UNIVERSITY 

? OF GEORGIA 

ATH ENS 



Entered at the Post Office at Athens, Ga., as Second Class Matter, August 31 1904 
under Act of Congress of July 16, 1904. Issued Monthly by the University. 



SERIAL NO. 



773 



This concise bulletin of The University of Georgia 
contains such material as will prove helpful to 
graduates of accredited high schools or prospective 
students and their parents. Complete information 
as to entrance requirements, to fees, living conditions, 
to organizations, to degree requirements, and brief 
summarized statements of the courses of study of- 
fered, together with the degree to which each leads, 
are given. It is believed that such a bulletin will 
prove more useful to prospective students arid parents 
than a catalogue or special bulletin. It is sent out on 
request, for such help as it may give young men and 
women who are thinking of coming to the Univer- 
sity. For further information, address the Regis- 
trar, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia. 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Board of Regents , . . . 4 

Administrative Officers 5 

General 5 

Educational 6 

Faculty and Staff 7-30 

The University 31-40 

Divisions of the University 34 

Student Guidance and Placement . . 37 

Women at the University 38 

Health Service 39 

Admission to the University 41-50 

Methods of Admission 41 

Registration Information 49 

Freshman Week 50 

Fees and Expenses ... 51-66 

Living Facilities 55 

Opportunities for Self-Help 58 

Scholarship and Loan Funds 59 

Student Activities and Organizations 66-71 

Honors and Appointments 69 

Regulations Governing Students 72-82 

Administrative Regulations 72 

Scholastic Regulations 73 

College of Arts and Sciences 83-99 

General 83 

Bachelor of Arts 86 

Bachelor of Science 89 

Bachelor of Science in Chemistry 93 

Bachelor of Fine Arts 94 

Other Schools and Colleges of the University 100-119 

School of Law 100 

College of Agriculture 101 

School of Pharmacy 104 

College of Education 104 

School of Commerce 108 

School of Journalism 114 

School of Home Economics 116 

School of Forestry 118 

Courses of Instruction 120-225 

Index 226 



THE BOARD OF REGENTS 
UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF GEORGIA 

Marion Smith, Chairman 
Leonard R. Siebert, Secretary 
W. Wilson Noyes, Treasurer 



E. D. Rivers, 

Governor of Georgia 

Marion Smith, Atlanta, 
State-at-Large, 

J. Knox Gholston, Comer, 
State-at-Large, 

George Hains, Augusta, 
State-at-Large, 

T. Jack Lance, Young Harris, 
State-at-Large, 

L. W. Robert, Jr., Atlanta, 
State-at-Large, 

John G. Kennedy, Savannah, 
First Congressional District, 

J. D. Gardner, Camilla, 

Second Congressional District, 

George C. Woodruff, Columbus, 
Third Congressional District, 

Cason J. Callaway, LaGrange, 
Fourth Congressional District, 

Clark Howell, Atlanta, 

Fifth Congressional District, 

Miller S. Bell, Milledgeville, 
Sixth Congressional District, 

R. D. Harvey, Lindale, 

Seventh Congressional District 

John W. Bennett, Sr., Waycross, 
Eighth Congressional District, 

Albert S. Hardy, Gainesville, 
Ninth Congressional District, 

Abit Nix, Athens, 

Tenth Congressional District, 



Ex Officio 
Term concurrent with that of Governor 
Term expires July 1, 1940 
Term expires July 1, 1940 
Term expires July 1, 1942 
Term expires July 1, 1942 
Term expires July 1, 1945 
Term expires July 1, 1941 
Term expires July 1, 1943 
Term expires July 1, 1941 
Term expires July 1, 1943 
Term expires July 1, 1941 
Term expires July 1, 1941 
Term expires July 1, 1943 
Term expires July 1, 1945 
Term expires July 1, 1943 



S. V. Sanford, Chancellor, University System of Georgia 



[ 4 ] 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 
GENERAL 

PRESIDENT 

Harmon White Caldwell 

DEAN OF ADMINISTRATION 

LlNVELLE LaURENTINE HENDREN 

DEAN OF THE CO-ORDINATE COLLEGE 
Richard Holmes Powell 

DEAN OF MEN 
William Tate 

DEAN OF WOMEN 

Ellen Rhodes McWhorter 

SECRETARY OF THE FACULTY 
William Davis Hooper 

REGISTRAR 

Thomas Walter Reed 

TREASURER 

John Dixon Bolton 

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 

Robert H. Parker, Director of Libraries 
Duncan Burnet, University Librarian 

UNIVERSITY INFIRMARY 

Dr. Harold Irwin Reynolds, University Physician 

DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE 
Kerr T. Riqgs, Commandant 

ATHLETICS 

William! Oscar Payne, Faculty Chairman and Director 

DORMITORIES AND DINING HALLS 

Benjamin Clarke Kinney, Business Manager 

PERSONNEL, PLACEMENT, LOANS, AND SCHOLARSHIPS 
Mary Brannon Bondurant, Personnel Officer 

THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA PRESS 

Frazier Moore, Director 
ALUMNI OFFICE; DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Dyar Massey, Secretary, Alumni Association and Director of Public 
Relations 

[ 5 ] 



EDUCATIONAL 

Note. The undergraduate colleges and schools are listed in the 
order of the date of their establishment. 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Roswell Powell Stephens, Dean 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES (Franklin College) 

Linville Laubentine Hendben, Dean 

Division of Biological Sciences — George Hugh Boyd, Director 
Division of Fine Arts — Hugh Hodgson, Director 
Division of Language and Literature — John Wade, Director 
Division of Physical Sciences — Alfred Witherspoon Scott, 

Director 
Division of Social Sciences — John Hanson Thomas McPhebson, 

Director 

SCHOOL OF LAW 

J. Alton Hosch, Dean 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
Paul Wllber Chapman, Dean 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

Robert Cumming Wilson, Dean 

PEABODY COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 
Walter Dewey Cocking, Dean 

SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 

Robert Preston Brooks, Dean 

HENRY W. GRADY SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM 
John EldridgE; Drewry, Director 

SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 
Mary Ethel Creswell, Director 

GEORGE FOSTER PEABODY SCHOOL OF FORESTRY 
Donald J. Weddell, Dean 



I 6 ] 



THE FACULTY AND STAFF 

Omer Clyde Aderhold, B.S.A., M.S., Ph.D. 

Professor of Rural and Vocational Education 

Leland Rogers Alexander, B.S.H.E., M.S.H.E. 

Assistant Professor of Institutional Management, in charge of 
Cafeteria 

Henry R. Anderson, Major, Infantry, U.S.A. 

Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics 

Mrs. K. Anderson 

Secretary, Zoology Department 

Frances Archer 

Co-ordinate College Librarian 

Bess M. Baled, B.S., M.A. 

Professor of Home Economics 

Agnes Barnes, A.B., B.S. in L.S. 

Reader's Consultant, General Library 

David Francis Barrow, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Mathematics 

Alice Beall, B.S.H.E., M.S.H.E. 

Associate Professor of Teacher Education in Home Economics 

Arno Becht. A.B., LL.M., J.D. 
Assistant Professor of Laic 

James G. Beckerly, A.B. 
Instructor in Physics 

Burnham Putnam Beckwith. A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of Economics 

Wightman Samuel Beckwith. A.B., M.A. 
Associate Professor of Mathematics 

Fred Sturges Beers, A.B. 

Examiner for the University System of Georgia 

Leo William Belcher, B.S.C. 
Assistant Treasurer 

Joseph Columbus Bell, B.S. A. 

Assistant Professor of Poultry Husbandry 

[ 7 ] 



8 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Frederick William Bennett, B.S.A., M.S. 
Associate Professor of Animal Husbandry 

Ruth Beussee 

Clerk, Poultry Husbandry Department 

Joseph T. Bill, B.F.A., M.L.A. 

Instructor in Landscape Architecture 

George Norman Bishop, B.S.F., M.S.F. 
Assistant Professor of Forestry 

Gustavus L. Blackwell, B.S.A. 

Instructor — Critic in Vocational Education 

Mary K. Blackwell 

Clerk, Vocational Education 

Margaret Harris Blair, B.S., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Home Economics 

Willis Henry Bocock, A.B., Litt.B., M.A., LL.D., Litt.D. 

Head of the Department of Greek and Milledge Professor of An- 
cient Languages ; Lecturer on International Relations 

John Dixon Bolton, C.P.A. 
Treasurer 

Mary Brannon Bondurant, A.B.J., M.A. 
Personnel Officer 

George Hugh Boyd, A.B., MS., Sc.D. 

Head of the Department of Zoology and Professor of Zoology 

J. Dowse Bradwell, A.B., M.Ph., LL.B. 
Lecturer in Law 

Joel Edward Brakefteld, B.A., M.S.C. 
Teaching Fellow in Accounting 

Lewis C. Branscomb, A.B., A.B.L.S. 
Order Assistant, General Library 

Jeff Bridges 

Clerk, Military Department 

Mrs. G. M. Broadhurst, B.S.Ed., M.A. 
Librarian, University High School 

John Ellis Broadnax, B.S.C. 

Assistant to Faculty Chairman of Athletics 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Chari.es Joseph Bkockman, B.A., Ch.E., M.A., M.S., Ph.D. 
Processor of Inorganic Chemistry 

Robert Preston Brooks, A.B., Ph.D. 

Dean of the School of Commerce and Professor of Eco?iomics 

Calvin S. Brown, A.B., M.A., B.A. (Oxon) Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of English 

Walter Scott Brown, B.S.A. 

Director of Agricultural Extension, 

Wendell H. Brown, A.B., M.A. 
Assistant Professor of English 

Anne Wallis Brumby, A.B., M.A. 

Associate Professor of Romance Languages 

Walter Clinton Burkhart, D.V.M., B.S. 
Professor of Bacteriology 

Duncan Burnet 
Librarian 

Tyus Butler, A.B.J., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Journalism 

Wallace Butts, A.B. 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education for Men; Head Football 
Coach 

Elon E. Byrd, B.Sc, M.Sc, Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of Zoology 

Harmon White Caldwell, A.B., LL.B., LL.D. 

President of The University of Georgia 

Iris Callaway, B.S., M.A. 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

Mrs. Gertrude Cantrell 
Assistant in Library 

William Fletcher Cantrell, B.S., M.S. 
Instructor in Zoology 

Annie Carlton 

Hostess and Memorial Hall Librarian 

Leonidas Myers Carter, B.S. 

Professor of Agricultural Chemistry 



10 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Claude Chance, A.B., M.A. 

Head of the Department of Romance Languages and Professor of 
Romance Languages 

Paul Wllber Chapman, B.S.A., B.S.Ed., M.S.A., Sc.D. 
Dean of the College of Agriculture 

Alberta Church 

Clerk, School of Home Economics 

Betty Clague, B.S., M.A. 

Instructor in Physical Education for Women 

Walter Dewey Cocking, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Dean of the Peabody College of Education and Professor of Edu- 
cation 

Howard T. Coggin, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 

Sigmund Cohn, J.D. (Breslau), J. D. (Genoa) 

Assistant Professor and Special Lecturer in the College of Arts 
and Sciences 

William Olin Collins, B.S.A. 
Professor of Agronomy 

Mrs. A. J. Conyers 

Nurse, Co-ordinate Infirmary 

Eleanor Cornelison 

Secretary to the Director of Public Relations 

Ellis Merton Coulter, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of History 

H. J. Walter Coutu, A.B., Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of Sociology 

Mary Ethel Creswell, B.S.H.E. 

Director of the School of Home Economics and Professor of Home 
Economics 

Geoffrey W. Crickmay, A.B., Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of Geology 

Edward Cass Crouse, A.B., M.A. 

Associate Professor of Dramatic Art 

Forrest Cumming, A.B., M.A. 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 



GENERAL INFORMATION 11 

Walter Newman Danner, Jr., B.S.A.E., M.S.A. 

Associate Professor of Agricultural Engineering 

Uriah Harrold Davenport, B.S. 

Professor of Agricultural Engineering 

Claude Davidson, A.B.J. 

News Bureau Director, Department of Public Relations 

William Wallace Davidson, A.B., M.A. 
Assistant Professor of English 

Myron C. Davis, B.S., M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Horticulture 

Hazel Deal, A.B., M.S. 

Instructor-Critic, Elementary School 

Edith Dearing, A.B. 

Secretary to the Dean of the Graduate School 

Wymberly Wormsloe de Renne, A.B. 

Archivist 

Sarah Devine, M.S. Ed. 

Critic, Elementary School 

Ellis Howard Dixon, A.B., M.S., Ph.D. 

Acting Head of the Department of Physics and Professor of Physics. 

Carolyn Hancock Dobbs 

Clerk, Office of the Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 

Lamar Dodd 

Head of the Department of Art and Associate Professor of Art 

Belle Newton Doolittle 
Assistant Registrar 

Sarah Doster, 

Clerk, College of Education 

Robert Tilden Dottery 
Bandmaster 

John Eldridge Drewry, A.B., B.J., M.A. 

Director of the School of Journalism and Professor of Journalism 

Rudolph Henry Driftmier, B.S.A.E., M.S.A.E. 

Head of the Department of Agricultural Engineering and Professor 
of Agricultural Engineering 



12 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Marion Derrelle DuBose, A.B., M.A. 
Professor of German 

Marie Dumas, A.B., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of English 

Nolee May Dunaway, A.B. 

Cleric, Department of Music 

A. O. Duncan, B.S.A. 

Associate Professor of Rural and Agricultural Education 

Wilbur Howard Duncan, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Instructor in Botany 

Miles Dorsey Dunlap, B.S., M.A. 
Lecturer in Social Science 

David Lewis Earnest, M.A. 

Associate Professor Emeritus of Education 

Austin Southwick Edwards, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 

Head of the Department of Psychology and Professor of Psychology 

John Olin Eidson, A.B., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of English 

Mamie McRee Elliott, A.B. 

Instructor-Critic, Elementary School 

Bertie Burger Ellis, A.B. 

Secretary to the President 

Herman A. Ellis, A.B., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Secretarial Studies 

Lucille Epps 

Secretary, Department of Secondary Education 

Edwin Mallard Everett, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of English 

John Richard Fain, B.S., Sc.D. 

Professor Emeritus of Agronomy 

Louise Fant, A.B. Ed., M.A. 
Reserves Librarian 

Mrs. H. H. Ferguson 

Clerk, The Practice School 



GENERAL INFORMATION 13 

Abthub E. Fink, A.B., M.A., M.S.W., Ph.D. 
Director of Social Work Training 

John William Fieob, B.S., M.S.A. 

Head of the Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural 
Sociology and Professor of Agricultural Economics and Rural 
Sociology 

Olin K. Fletcher 

Stockkeeper, Division of Biological Sciences 

Loree Florence, M.D. 
Assistant Physician 

Evelyn Fritz, A.B., A.B. in L.S. 

Classifier, General Library 

Fbank Harold Frost, B.S.C., M.A. 

Associate Professor of Physical Education for Men 

Edith Fulghum 

Clerk, Vocational Education 

Willabd H. Gasman, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of Agronomy 

Ellis Garrett, B.S.A. 

Instructor-Critic, Vocational Education 

Joseph B. Gittler, B.S., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Sociology 

Lillian Glenn, A.B., A.B. in L.S. 
Cataloguer, General Library 

Alice Lee Googe, A.B., A.B. L.S. 
Cataloguer, General Library 

Bishop Franklin Grant, B.S.F., M.S.F. 

Professor of Forestry 

Thomas Fitzgerald Green, A.B., LL.B., J.S.D. 

Professor of Law 

James Edward Greene, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Education 

Edith Guill, B.S., M.A. 

Instructor in Physical Education for Women 



14 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Mattie B. Gulley 

Clerk, Vocational Education 

Tommie Hailey 

Secretary, Chemistry Department 

Elizabeth Hale 

Nurse, Crawford W. Long Infirmary 

Marion Hill, A.B., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Romance Languages 

Thomas Jewell Harrold, B.S.A., M.S.A., Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of Botany 

William Hartman, B.S.C. 
Assistant Football Coach 

Harold Milton Heckman, B.S.C, M.A., C.P.A. 
Professor of Accounting 

Linville Laurentine Hendren, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Head of the Department of Physics and Astronomy and Professor 
of Physics and Astronomy ; Dean of the College of Arts and 
Sciences and Dean of Administration 

Robert Gilbert Henry, A.B., M.S. 
Assistant Professor of Physics 

Mrs. R. G. Henry, A.B. 

Assistant to the University System of Georgia Examiner 

Albert Herring 

Assistant Stockkeeper, Chemistry Department 

Irma Hicks, B.S., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Home Economics 

Pope Russell Hill, B.S.A., M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Sara Hill, A.B. 

Clerk, Department of Landscape Architecture 

Roy E. Hitchcock 

Architectural Designer 

Hugh Hodgson, B.S. 

Head of the Department of Music and Professor of Music 



GENERAL INFORMATION 15 



Roberta Hodgson, A.B., M.A. 

Instructor Emeritus in History 

Annie Mae Holliday, B.S. 
Associate Professor of Art 

Louise Hollingsworth, A.B., B.S. 
Reference Librarian 

Howell Hollis, B.S. 

Freshman Football Coach 

Richard Honig, J.U.D. (Erlangen) 
Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

Joseph P. Holloman 

Staff Sergeant, Military Department 

Capers A. Holmes, A.B.J. 
Editor, Alumni Record 

Maude Pye Hood, B.S.H.E., M.S.H.E. 

Assistant Professor of Home Economics 

William Davis Hooper, A.B., M.A., Litt.D. 

Head of the Department of Latin and Professor of Latin; Secretary 
of the University Faculty 

J. Alton Hosch, B.S.C., M.A., LL.B. 

Dean of the School of Law and Professor of Law 

Kate Houx, A.B., M.A. 

Associate Professor of Education 

William Eugene Hudson, B.S.A.E., M.S.A.E. 
Instructor in Agricultural Engineering 

Melvin Clyde Hughes, A.B., M.A. 
Instructor in History 

Edna Potts Hulme 

Secretary to the Dean of the College of Agriculture 

Arthur G. Hutchinson, Major, Infantry, U.S.A. 

Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics 

George Alexander Hutchinson, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Head of the Department of Sociology and Professor of Sociology 

Nolen M. Irby, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of Education and Director of Field Studies 



16 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Mattie Weavee Jacob, A.B. 

Instructor-Critic, Elementary School 

Edwin James, B.S., M.C. 

Assistant Professor of Agronomy 

Milton Preston Jaenagin, B.S.A., M. Agr., Sc.D. 

Head of the Department of Animal Husbandry and Professor of 
Animal Husbandry 

John Wilkinson Jenkins, A.B., M.A. 
Professor of Economics 

Ralph William Jenson, A.B. 

Manager, Printing Department, The University of Georgia Press 

Loreen Joiner 

Clerk, University Press 

Clarence Wiliford Jones 
Swimming Coach 

Emily Jones, A.B., M.A. 

Instructor-Critic in Lower Elementary Grades 

Emmie Jones 

Secretary, General Library 

Thomas J. Jones, B.S.A., D.V.M. 

Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry 

Helen Jordan, A.B., M.A., M.S. 
Teaching Fellow in Zoology 

Floyd Jordan, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Education 

Effie Lou Keaster, B.S., M.A. 

Instructor in Physical Education for Women 

Pauline Keelyn 

Secretary to the Dean of the School of Laic 

Rufus LaFayette Keener, B.S.A., M.S. A. 
Associate Professor of Horticulture 

Willett Main Kempton, A.B., M.A. 
Assistant Professor of Journalism 

Lois Kenney 

Clerk, Department of Physical Education for Women 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Frances Kilpatrick, B.S.C. 
Secretary, Personnel Office 

Lucile Kimble, A.B. 
Instructor in Music 

Frank P. King, B.S.A., M.S.A. 

Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology 

Benjamin Clarke Kinney, A.B., M.A. 

Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds and Supervisor of Dorm- 
itories and Dining Halls 

Jasper Kirby 

Technical Sergeant, Military Department 

L. R. Kuhn, B.S., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Bacteriology 

Elizabeth LaBoone, A.B., A.B. in L.S. 
Binding Assistant, General Library 

Sarah Bailey Lamar 
Law Librarian 

Elmer A. Lampe, Ph.B., M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education for Men; Basketball 
Coach 

Frank Bristol Lanham, B.S., M.S. 
Research Agricultural Engineer 

Mildred Ledford, B.S. Ed., M.A. 
Associate Professor of Art 

Thomas Arthur Leyden, B.S.C, M.A. 
Instructor in Accounting 

Ruby Louvern 

Clerk, Vocational Agriculture 

Quinton Lumpkin, B.S. Ed. 
Assistant Football Coach 

Horace O. Lund, A.B., M.S., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Entomology 

FlTZPATRICK LUTZ 

Athletic Trainer 



18 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Louise Lamar MacNider 
Alumnae Secretary 

Elisabeth Davis Mallary, A.B., M.A. 

Editorial Assistant, The University of Georgia Press 

Eugene Pennington Mallary, B.L., LL.B., M.A. 
Assistant Professor of Social Science 

Sidney Walter Martin, A.B., M.A. 
Instructor in History 

Dyar Massey, A.B.J., M.A. 

Director of Public Relations, Alumni Secretary, and Instructor in 
Journalism 

John Cassius Meadows, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Sociology 

Julian Howell Miller, B.S.A., M.S., Ph.D. 

Head of the Department of Plant Breeding and Pathology and Pro- 
fessor of Plant Breeding and Pathology 

J. H. Mitchell, B.S.A. 

Associate Professor, Vocational Education 

Erma Dora Mollenhoff, B.S.H.E. 
Supervisor of Adult Education 

Pearl C. Moon, B.S.H.E., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Home Economics 

Hamilton Frazter Moore, A.B., M.A. 

Director, The University of Georgia Press 

John Morris, A.B., M.A., B.L. 

Head of the Department of Germanic Languages and Professor of 
Germanic Languages 

Bertrand Mobrow, Major, Cavalry, U.S.A. 

Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics 

Paul Reed Morrow, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Education 

John Hulon Mote, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Physical Chemistry 

Calvtn Clyde Murray, B.S., M.S. 

Associate Professor of Agronomy 



GENERAL INFORMATION 19 



Veba Parker Murray 

Secretary, Art Department 

Hazel Loyd McClintick 

Secretary to the Director of Libraries 

Mary McClure 

Secretary to the Treasurer 

Mrs. Nell McCorkxe 

Clerk, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology 

Michael Angelo McDowell, Jr., A.B. 
Assistant Professor of Music 

Martha McElveen, B.S. Phar. 

Secretary, School of Pharmacy 

Joseph E. McGlll, Captain, Infantry, U.S.A. 

Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics 

Thomas Hubbard McHatton, B.S. (inHort.) Hort. M., Sc.D. 

Head of the Department of Horticulture and Professor of Horti- 
culture 

Alfred Donald McKellar, B.S.F., M.S.F. 
Assistant Professor of Forestry 

Margaret Elizabeth McPhaul, B.S.H.E. 
Intructor in Home Economics 

John Hanson Thomas McPherson, A.B., Ph.D. 

Head of the Department of History and Political Science and Pro- 
fessor of History and Political Science 

QuiNELLE McRae, B.S.H.E., M.S.H.E. 
Instructor in Home Economics 

Ellen Rhodes McWhorter, A.B., M.A. 

Associate Professor of English and Dean of Women 

Robert Ligon McWhorter, A.B., M.A. 
Professor of Latin 

Robert Ligon McWhorter, A.B., LL.B. 
Professor of Law 

Catherine Newton, B.S.H.E., M.A. 

Associate Professor of Home Economics 



20 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Winnie Reid Newton 

Secretary to the Registrar 

John William Nuttycombe, B.S. Chem., Ph.D. 
Professor of Zoology 

George Ligon O'Kelley, Jr., B.S. Ed. 

Instructor-Critic in Vocational Education, High School 

R. Travis Osborne, A.B., M.S. 

Instructor-Critic in Science, High School 

Hubert Bond Owens, B.S.A., M.A. 

Head of the Department of Landscape Architecture and Associate 
Professor of Landscape Architecture 

Robert Emory Park, M.A., Litt.D. 

Head of the Department of English and Professor of English 

Jessie Mae Parker, B.S.H.E. 

Instructor-Critic in Vocational Education, High School 

Ralph Halstead Parker, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Director of Libraries 

Edd Winfield Parks, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of English 

William Oscar Payne, A.B., M.A. 

Professor of History; Faculty Chairman and Director of Athletics 

A. E. Patterson, B.S.F., M.S.F. 
Assistant Professor of Forestry 

Eleanor Peebles, A.B. 

Fellow in Physical Education for Women 

Frank Western Peikert, B.S.M.E., M.S.A.E. 

Associate Professor of Agricultural Engineering 

L. Dennis Penny, LL.B. 

Assistant State Supervisor of Purchases 

Albert H. Peyton, Lieutenant-Colonel, Infantry, U.S.A. 
Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics 

Hazel Philbrick 

Chief Cataloguer, Libraries 

Merritt Bloodworth Pound, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of History 



GENERAL INFORMATION 21 

Richard Holmes Powell, A.B., M.A., LL.D. 

Dean of the Co-ordinate College and Professor of English 

Helen Priest, M.A. 

Instructor in Physical Education for Women 

Agnes E. Pulliam 

Clerk, Department of Animal Husbandry 

William A. Purdum, B.S., M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

Edwin Davis Pusey, A.B., M.A., LL.D. 
Professor of Education 

Lloyd B. Raisty, B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D., C.P.A. 
Professor of Accounting 

Thomas Walter Reed, M.A., LL.B. 
Registrar 

Nelle Mae Reese 

Librarian, College of Agriculture 

Harold Irwin Reynolds, A.B., M.D., F.A.C.P. 
University Physician 

Margaret Reynolds, B.S., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education for Women 

Waldo Silas Rice, B.S.A., M.S.A. 
Professor of Animal Husbandry 

Albert G. G. Richardson, D.V.M. 

Professor Emeritus of Animal Husbandry 

Horace Bonar Ritchie, A.B., M.A. 
Professor of Education 

Kerr Tunis Riggs, Colonel, Cavalry, U.S.A. 

Commandant and Professor of Military Science and Tactics 

J. Harold Saxon, A.B., M.A. 

University High School Inspector and Secretary to Georgia Accred- 
iting Commission 

Albert B. Saye, A.B., M.A. 
Instructor in History 

Ruth Kendrick Saye, A.B. Ed. 

Secretary to the Dean of Administration 



22 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Chabi.es Franklin Scheidee, B.S.C. 
Teaching Fellow in Commerce 

Lillian Schmidt, A.B., B.S., M.S. 

Associate Professor of Home Economics Education 

Alfred Witherspoon Scott, B.S., Ph.D. 

Head of the Department of Chemistry, Professor of Organic Chem- 
istry and Terrell Professor of Agricultural Chemistry 

Constance Scott 

Secretary to the Dean of the College of Education 

Edgar Lee Secrest, A.B. 

Director, Voluntary Religious Association 

Robert Taylor Segrest, B.S.C, M.S.C. 
Assistant Professor of Economics 

Edward Scott Sell, B.S.A., M.S. 

Head of the Department of Geography and Professor of Geography 

Evelyn Sellers, A.B. 

Secretary to the Dean of Women 

Ashley Sellers, A.B., LL.B., S.J.D. 
Professor of Law 

LaFayette Miles Sheffer, B.S. 

State Director of Vocational Education 

Henry Arthur Shinn, A.B., J.D. 
Professor of Law 

James Van V. Shufelt, Major, Cavalry, U.S.A. 

Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics 

J. V. Sikes, B.S.A. 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education for Men; Baseball Coach 

Joseph W. Simons, B.S.A.E. 

Junior Agricultural Engineer, U.S.D.A. 

Florence Alice Simpson, A.B. Ed., M.A. 

Instructor-Critic in Latin and Mathematics, High School 

Stanton James Singleton, A.B. 
Principal, High School 



GENERAL INFORMATION 23 

M AEG ABET SLATON SlNGLETON, A.B. 

Secretary to the Dean of the Co-ordinate College 

Jennie Belle Smith, B.M. 

Associate Professor of Public School Music 

Ellen Ione Smith 

Clerk, Department of Horticulture 

Laura Isabel Smith, A.B. 

Clerk, Office of the Dean of Administration 

Willie Smith 

Clerk, Department of Agronomy 

Rurus Hummeb Snyder. B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of Physics 

Maby Ella Lunday Soule, A.B., M.A. 

Head of the Department of Physical Education for Women and 
Professor of Physical Education for Women 

James Alexander Sprutll Jr.. A.B., B.A. (Oxon.), LL.B., LL.M. 
Associate Professor of Law 

Emma Simpson Stephens, A.B., M.R.E. 

Assistant Director, Voluntary Religious Association 

Robebt Gbieb Stephens Jb., A.B., M.A. 
Instructor in History 

Roswell Powell Stephens, A.B., Ph.D. 

Head of the Department of Mathematics and Professor of Mathe- 
matics; Dean of the Graduate School 

Julia Floyd Stovall, B.S.A.A. 
Clerk, Registrar's Office 

Charles Morton Stbahan, C. and M.E., Sc.D. 

Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering and Professor of Applied 
Mathematics 

Maby Stbahan, A.B., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Romance Languages 

Luba Belle Stbong, A.B. 

Instructor Emeritus in Physical Education for Women 

Wooten Taylob Stjmebfobd, B.S. Phar., M.S. Ch. 
Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 



24 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Glenn Wallace Sutton, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Finance 

Rachel Sibley Sutton, A.B., M.A. 
Assistant Professor of Education 

Emeliza Swain, M.S. Ed. 

Critic, Elementary School 

William Tate, A.B., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of English; Dean of Men 

Duchess Williams Taylob 
Assistant Treasurer 

A. E. Terry, B.Ph., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of German 

James Ralph Thaxton, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Romance Languages 

Constance Thomas, A.B.J. 

Secretary, School of Journalism 

George Edward Thompson, B.S.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology 

R. B. Thorstenberg, A.B. 

Counseling Assistant, Personnel Office 

Mary J. Tingle, A.B., M.A. 

Instructor-Critic in English, High School 

John Laurens Tison Jr., A.B., M.A. 
Instructor in English 

A. Elizabeth Todd, B.Ph., M.A. 

Professor of Home Economics Education 

Marguerite Tolar 

Clerk, Office of Assistant State Supervisor of Purchases 

Forrest Grady Towns, B.S. Ed. 
Track Coach 

Richard B. Trimble, LL.B., Lieutenant Colonel, Cavalry, U.S.A. 
Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics 

Carolyn Vance, A.B. 

Assistant Professor of English 



GENERAL INFORMATION 25 

John Donald Wade, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of English 

Roosevelt Pruyn Walker, A.B., M.A. 
Professor of English 

T. Garland Walters, B.S.A. 

Associate Professor of Vocational Education 

Clifton Albert Ward, B.S.A. , M.S. 
Instructor in Dairy Processing 

Mary Ward 

Accompanist, Physical Education for Women 

Hoyt Ware, A.B.J. 

Assistant Editor, University Press 

Walter Preston Warren, A.B., LL.B. 
Assistant Registrar 

A. J. Waters, B.S., M.S. 
Instructor in Zoology 

Leroy Watson Jr., B.S.F. 
Instructor in Forestry 

Robert Wauchope, A.B., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Archaeology 

Annie Lene Johnson Webb 

Clerk, Department of Vocational Education 

Donald J. Weddell, B.S.P., M.S., 

Dean of the George Foster Peabody School of Forestry and Pro- 
fessor of Forestry 

Robert Hunter West, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of English 

John Taylor Wheeler, B.S.A., M.S., Ph.D. 

Director of the Department of Vocational Education and Professor 
of Rural and Agricultural Education 

Comer Whitehead, B.S. 

Supervisor of Tabulating Machines 

Dorothy Sims Whitehead, B.S., M.A. 
NY A Supervisor 

Thomas Hillyer Whitehead, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Analytical Chemistry 



26 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Virginia Peacock Whitehead, B.S. 
Secretary, and Mail Clerk, 

J. B. Yv*HITWORTH, B.S. 

Assistant Football Coach 

RUBYE WlLBANKS 

Clerk, Poultry Science Department 

Cecil Norton Wilder, B.S.A., M.S.A. 

Associate Professor of Agricultural Chemistry 

Eleanor B. J. Williams, A.B., M.A. 
Clerk, Language and Literature 

Kenneth Rast Williams, B.S., M.A. 
Associate Professor of Education 

Madge Wilson, B.S. Ed. 

Instructor-Critic, Elementary School 

J. H. Wilson, B.S.A. 

Instructor-Critic in Vocational Education 

Robert Cumming Wilson, Ph.G. 

Dean of the School of Pharmacy and Professor of Pharmacy and 
Materia Medica 

Virginia M. Wilson, A.B., A.B.L.S. 
Cataloguer, General Library 

Wilburn Jackson Winter, A.B. 

Lecturer in Commerce and Director of the Bureau of Statistics 

Clair L. Worley, B.S., M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Botany 

Jamie Miller Wotton 

Chief of Circulation, General Library 

James Couper Wright, D.A. 
Assistant Professor of Art 

Nettie Wright 

Clerk, Department of Agricultural Engineering 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



William Hazer Wrighton, A.B., M.A., D.D. 

Head of the Department of Philosophy and Associate Professor of 
Philosophy 

Lillian Wynne 

Nurse, Crawford W. Long Infirmary 

Florene Young, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Wade Phillips Young, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology 

May Zeigler, A.B., M.A. 

Associate Professor of Psychology 



28 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

GRADUATE AND STUDENT ASSISTANTS 
W. 0. Beecher, Education 
Theo T. Beck, Romance Languages 
J. C. Bledsoe, Education 
C. L. Bowden, Physics 
Elizabeth Burns, Education 
Donald Calhoun, Philosophy 
Jane Clary, Music 
Ernest P. Cofield Jr., Chemistry 
Raymond Corey, History 
Louise Cowan, Education 
Frances Cowaet, German 
Johnnye Cox, Education 
Lowell Cumming, Treasurer's Office 
Helen Doster, Education 
Pope A. Duncan, Physics 
J. D. Elder, Practice School 
Albert B. Falloon, Agriculture 
Harvey Ferguson, Education 
J. O. Fleming, Poultry 
J. R. Fordham, Poultry Husbandry 
Reuben Gambrell, Art 
Seth Gilkerson, Zoology 
Marvin Glllis, Poultry Husbandry 
Claud B. Green, English 
Louis Griffeth, Journalism 
R. G. Grogan, Plant Pathology 
James Hacke, Physics 



GENERAL INFORMATION 29 



William W. Harper, Agricultural Economics 

George Haslam, Geography 

Sara Hitchcock, Practice School 

Harry Hobsey Jb., Psychology 

Oma Lee Jackson, Zoology 

Joe S. Jacob, Education 

Cabboll Johnson, Practice School 

W. O. Keabse, Chemistry 

Betty Kikeb, Education 

Alan Kuzmicki, Art 

Martha LaBoone, Home Economics 

Henby Madden, Art 

Ruth Mitchell, Commerce 

Martha Moore, Practice School 

S. T. Moore, Agricultural Engineering 

Raymond McMahon, Art 

Eugene McConnell, Poultry 

J. C. McLendon, Education 

Maby Pennington, Practice School 

H. W. Pope, Chemistry 

W. A. Pbatheb, Agronomy 

Robebt J. Reiber, Zoology 

Mabel Robinson, Education 

Ben E. Sanders, Chemistry 

W. J. Shelburne, Chemistry 

Sumner J. Smith, Practice School 

George A. Smith, Education 

Andrew H. Sparks, English 



30 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Corinne Stephens, English 
Ralph Stephens, English 
A. J. Strickland, Education 
D. T. Sullivan, Horticulture 
Karl Thaxton, Physics 
Henry D. Thomas, Zoology 
Paul R. Thomas, Chemistry 
Frances Tregone, Commerce 
Dixon Warren, Romance Languages 
Perry Westbrook, Practice School 
J. Mason Williams, Education 
Olleen Williams, Art 
Nell Winn, Education 



THE UNIVERSITY 

HISTORY 

Early in February, 1784, the Legislature of Georgia set aside 
40,000 acres of land for "the endowment of a college or seminary 
of learning." Thus, five months after the signing of the treaty of 
peace granting Georgia her independence, The University of Georgia 
was born. The' next year the Legislature granted a charter to the 
University, thereby giving this institution the distinction of being 
the first state university to be granted a charter. 

Franklin College, the first unit of the University, actually opened 
its classes to the young men of the state in August, 1801. Since that 
date the record of The University of Georgia has consistently been 
an integral part of the social and political history of this State. 

Though it has admitted young women to its classes only during the 
past 20 years of its long history, the University has already estab- 
lished itself as one of the largest and finest women's colleges in the 
Southeast. 

ORGANIZATION 

The University is made up of the following schools and colleges: 
The College of Arts and Sciences 
School of Law 
College of Agriculture 
School of Pharmacy 
Peabody College of Education 
School of Commerce 
Henry W. Grady School of Journalism 
School of Home Economics 
George Foster Peabody School of Forestry 
The Graduate School 

CAMPUSES 

Campus I: Three distinct campuses are maintained by the Uni- 
versity. 

The old campus, often spoken of as Franklin College Campus, is 
located in the heart of Athens. Among the old buildings on this 
campus of historic interest but still in good repair and in use are: 
Old College, the University's first building; the historic 108-year- 
old Chapel; and the Academic Building, one wing of which dates 
back to 1831. 

[31] 



32 THE UNIVERSITY 3 F GEORGIA 

Among the newer buildings are Harold Hirsch Hall, the beauti- 
ful home of the School of Law; the imposing Commerce-Journalism 
Building; the new LeConte Hall, the home of the biological science 
departments; and the new Language-Literature Building, and the 
new Auditorium and Fine Arts Building. The old Moore Building 
has been recently remodeled for the use of the Physics Department 
and the upper floors of the old New College Dormitory have been 
remodeled for the School of Pharmacy. Joseph E. Brown Hall and 
Clark Howell Hall are modern new dormitories for men. Milledge 
Hall has been recently completed according to the original plan 
and an annex added, tripling its capacity. In addition to the above 
there are more than twenty other classroom and dormitory struc- 
tures on this campus. 

The College of Arts and Sciences, the College of Education, and 
the Schools of Law, Pharmacy, Commerce and Journalism are lo- 
cated on this main campus. Recently a new and modernly designed 
Demonstration School Building for the College of Education has 
been completed. 

Campus II: The campus of the College of Agriculture contains 140 
acres. A number of well designed buildings are on this campus, the 
newest of which is a Dairy Husbandry Building ready for use in 
September, 1940. The School of Home Economics is located on part 
of the old College of Agriculture campus. Dawson Hall is a modern 
classroom and laboratory building, designed for home economics 
work. In course of construction and ready for use in September, 
19 40 are a new dining hall for women, four new home management 
houses and a nursery school building. 

Here is found also a modern physical education building for 
women and three dormitories for girls. Two of these dormitories, 
Mary Lyndon Hall and a close duplicate, as yet unnamed, are new. 
The School of Forestry building, recently erected, is a modern 
forestry buuilding. In close proximity to this campus are tracts 
embracing more than 3,000 acres of land which are used by the 
various departments of the College of Agriculture and School of 
Forestry. 

Campus III : Located some distance from these campuses is the 
60-acre Coordinate College campus, where freshman and sophomore 
women reside and have all their classes. 

This campus, made up of ten buildings, including dormitories, 
classrooms, a dining hall, and a special library, enables the Univer- 
sity to offer the young woman student many advantages during 
the first two years of her college life and all of the University 
privileges. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



THE COLLEGE YEAR 

The College year is divided into four quarters — Fall, Winter, 
Spring, and Summer. Each quarter, complete in itself, extends ap- 
proximately eleven weeks. The traditional college year from Septem- 
ber to June consists of Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Many 
students, however, shorten the time required for graduation by at- 
tending both the regular session and the Summer Quarter. 

THE SUMMER QUARTER 

The Summer Quarter is divided into two distinct terms. The first 
term of the Summer Quarter continues for six weeks with special 
courses for teachers, and the second term for five weeks. The Sum- 
mer Quarter has an expanded curriculum, and other special features 
to meet the wider demands made upon it by the teachers and others. 

Bulletins of the Summer School are published in March each year. 

CORRESPONDENCE AND EXTENSION 

Correspondence or extension work done under the auspices of the 
University System of Georgia Extension Division or other approved 
institutions can be credited to a maximum extent of one-fourth the 
degree requirements (49 hours.) 

In general students in residence are not allowed to do correspond- 
ence or extension work while registered as a student during any of 
the four quarters. This also applies to the interval between any two 
successive quarters except that between the Summer and Fall Quar- 
ters. Where in special cases correspondence work is allowed, all the 
regulations concerning extra loads of work apply. 

PUBLICATIONS OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Bulletin of The University of Georgia. Under this general title the 
University issues a monthly publication, which is sent to regular 
mailing lists or may be had upon application to the University. 

This includes the register, the General Catalogue of the Univer- 
sity, announcements of the Summer Quarter, the special announce- 
ments of the various schools and colleges, the Graduate Schools, and 
several numbers of a scientific and literary nature. 

The Alumni Record, issued monthly by the Alumni Society. 

Bulletins of Farmers Institutes. 

College of Education News Letter. 

Progress Report. Monthly Report for Georgia National Egg Laying 
Contest. 

Institute for Study of Georgia Problems publications. 



34 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

DIVISIONS OF THE UNIVERSITY 

THE JUNIOR DIVISION 

The Junior Division consists of the freshman and sophomore years. 
The Junior Division program of study for all degrees is designed 
to give the student a broad general education such that, if he can- 
not pursue his education beyond the Junior Division, he will have 
the mental equipment to become a useful and intelligent citizen, and 
such that, if he does continue his studies into the Senior Division 
as a candidate for a liberal arts or professional degree, he will have 
sufficient basic training to pursue these studies with profit. This 
is especially true for the programs offered in the general degrees 
in the College of Arts and Sciences and its affiliated schools. 

The Junior Division is under the general supervision of the Presi- 
dent and the Dean of Administration. The details of administra- 
tion for men students are largely handled by the Dean of Adminis- 
tration, assisted by the Dean of Men; and those for women students 
are handled by the Dean of the Co-ordinate College and the Dean 
of Women. 

THE SENIOR DIVISION 

The Senior Division consists of the junior and senior years. 
Senior Division courses of study are designed for more mature stu- 
dents than Junior Division courses and are in general more diffi- 
cult, throwing the student more upon his own resources. 

A student is admitted to the Senior Division without condition 
when he has successfully completed the Junior Division require- 
ments for some degree, all of which include 96 hours of academic 
work, 10 hours in Military Science for men or 10 hours Physical 
Education for women. Quality points (see page 77) to the extent of 
96 are required for admission to the Senior Division. 

The work of the Junior Division is, in general, designed to round 
out the student's general education, while the work of the Senior 
Division is largely concentrated on a comparatively narrow range 
of subjects. 

On registering in the Senior Division as a candidate for any 
degree each student must select a major subject. The work required 
in this major subject varies with the degree chosen (see degree re- 
quirements) but in general constitutes the heart of the Senior Divi- 
sion program. At least half of the courses in a student's major, both 
as to division and subject, must be completed in residence at Athens. 

Upon registering in the Senior Division each student must present 
in writing a program of courses for the entire work of the Senior 



GENERAL INFORMATION 35 



Division. This program must be approved in writing by the professor 
in charge of his major and the dean or director of his college or 
school. This program must be filed in the office of the Registrar 
and cannot be changed unless by written consent of the major pro- 
fessor and dean or director of the student's college or school. 
The University offers the following undergraduate degrees: 

Bachelor of Arts 

Bachelor of Fine Arts 

Bachelor of Science 

Bachelor of Science in Chemistry 

Bachelor of Arts in Journalism 

Bachelor of Science in Commerce 

Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 

Bachelor of Science in Agriculture 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering 

Bachelor of Science in Forestry 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics 

Bachelor of Science in Education 

Bachelor of Science in Physical Education 

Bachelor of Laws 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

The Graduate School is administered by the Dean and the Grad- 
uate Council appointed annually by the President of the University. 
The Dean is Chairman of the Council. 

Admission to the Graduate School may be granted to graduates 
of institutions whose requirements for the bachelor's degree are sub- 
stantially equivalent to those of The University of Georgia, and to 
applicants from other institutions approved by the Faculty. 

Admission to the Graduate School does not necessarily imply ad- 
mission to candidacy for a degree. A mere accumulation of credits 
is not sufficient. 

Application blanks for admission may be secured from the Dean 
of the Graduate School or the Registrar. Every applicant must 
submit with his application an official transcript of his college rec- 
ord. 

The following degrees are offered in the Graduate School: 
Master of Arts 
Master of Science 
Master of Science in Agriculture 
Master of Science in Agricultural Engineering 
Master of Science in Forestry 
Master of Science in Commerce 
Master of Science in Home Economics 



36 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Master of Education 
Master of Science in Chemistry- 
Master of Science in Education 
Doctor of Education 
Doctor of Philosophy 
For further information write for the special bulletin of the 
Graduate School. 

SOCIAL WORK 

The University offers in its Graduate School a program of courses 
for basic training in social work. For details of these courses con- 
sult the graduate bulletin. 

Undergraduate students contemplating a program of social work 
after graduation should have a broad background of courses in the 
social sciences as outlined in the graduate bulletin announcement. 

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

Beginning with the Fall quarter of 1940-41 the University will 
offer a course in Public Administration designed to prepare stu- 
dents for positions in government service. The new course will be 
a joint enterprise of the School of Commerce, the Department of 
History and Political Science, and the Department of Social Work. 
The course will be administered by the School of Commerce and 
will take the form of an additional group available to Senior Col- 
lege students registered for the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Commerce. Students registered for the A. B. degree and majoring 
in Political Science will also have access to the course. 

The fundamental background courses in the new work will be 
provided by the Department of History and Political Science. The 
technical courses will be chosen from the curriculum of the School 
of Commerce. The Executive Committee of the University has au- 
thorized two new courses in Public Administration to be offered in 
the School of Commerce. The Department of Social Work will co- 
operate by offering a new course called Introduction to Welfare 
Administration. 

Required courses, listed under the Public Administration group in 
the School of Commerce concentration divisions, make up only 
about 50 per cent of the total number of courses ordinarily taken 
by Senior College students. It is the intention to round out the 
curriculum in Public Administration by advising students to regis- 
ter for additional appropriate courses in History, Sociology, Psy- 
chology, and Education. 

The course in Public Administration as arranged is an instance 
of the cooperation among the schools and departments of the Uni- 



GENERAL INFORMATION 37 

versity which is becoming more and more characteristic of the Uni- 
versity. It is realized that to be adequately trained for public ser- 
vice, students need contacts with all the disciplines commonly group- 
ed as Social Sciences, and the University authorities intend in this 
new offering to bring about effective cooperation among the Social 
Sciences for this purpose. 

STUDENT GUIDANCE AND PLACEMENT 

PERSONNEL OFFICE 

This office seeks to bring to bear on the individual student while 
in college all of those influences which tend to develop him morally, 
physically, and intellectually. 

In its loan activities the office administers the various University 
student loan funds, with the exception of the Dawson Fund for Col- 
lege of Agriculture students. 

Under its placement activities the office attempts to place Uni- 
versity students and graduates, including teachers, in the best posi- 
tions which can be located for which they are qualified. Complete 
records are kept of the qualifications of all who file their names for 
this service. Contacts are maintained as far as practicable with 
prospective employers and sources of employment. The University 
has an excellent record on the placement of its graduates. 

The Personnel Office also assists students and graduates who are 
interested in camping to locate jobs as counsellors and assistants 
in summer camps. This service is particularly attractive to teachers 
whose schools do not have a summer session. Students and grad- 
uates should contact the Camp Placement Bureau by February 1 
if they are interested in camp work for the following summer. 

STUDENT COUNSELORS 

A number of members of the Faculty, both men and women, who 
have an especial interest in students and their problems are trained 
and prepared to act as confidential counselors to help students to 
adjust themselves to the many personal problems involved in col- 
lege life; also to act as advisers in matters of taking up and drop- 
ping programs and courses. Students are not forced to consult these 
counselors but will usually benefit by maintaining contact with a 
Faculty counselor from the beginning of their college careers. The 
counseling program is administered by the Personnel Officer, and 
students who wish a conference with a counselor can obtain the 
names of the counselors from the Personnel Officer, who will help 
the student make an engagement for a conference. 



38 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

In addition to these Faculty counselors the Dean of Men and 
the Dean of Women, who are primarily responsible for student 
morale, are ready at all times to consult with students with refer- 
ence to their problems. 

THE TESTING BUREAU 

More recently there has been organized in cooperation with the 
Personnel Office a Testing Bureau for students of the University. 
Through this bureau tests and examinations are offered students for 
the purpose of determining intellectual abilities, special aptitudes, 
personality traits, etc., in relation to the personnel work of the Uni- 
versity. No attempt will be made to decide for a student what pro- 
fession he should enter; he will be given information from the 
results of testing to help him make a wise choice. Arrangements 
for these examinations will be made through the personnel office. 

WOMEN AT THE UNIVERSITY 

THE CO-ORDINATE COLLEGE FOR WOMEN 

The instruction of undergraduate women through the Junior 
Division (freshman and sophomore years) is offered in the Co- 
ordinate College for women of The University of Georgia. Fresh- 
man and sophomore students are required to live on this campus 
unless permitted to live with close relatives in town or in approved 
sorority houses. Women in the Coordinate College are taught by 
the regular University faculty. They have their own library facil- 
ities and likewise have the use of the University library. For some 
of the science laboratory work they have their own laboratories and 
for other work they use the laboratories on the main campus. They 
have their own recreational and social facilities. In addition they 
have the privilege of all social and cultural elements of university 
life. They have the advantage of all extra-curricular activities, 
glee clubs, dramatic clubs, sports, sororities and other similar 
organizations. 

The affairs of the Coordinate College are administered by a Dean 
resident on the campus. 

THE SENIOR DIVISION FOR WOMEN 

Instruction for the Senior* Division (i. e. juniors and seniors) and 
graduate women is on a co-educational basis and given on the main 
campus. Physical education and home economics courses are largely 
given on the Agricultural College unit of the main campus while the 



GENERAL INFORMATION 3j) 

other courses are on the old Franklin College unit. Living facilities 
are described later. 

All dormitories, sorority houses and women's activities (including 
the Co-ordinate College) are under the personal supervision of the 
University Dean of Women. Student conduct and discipline are 
regulated by the Student Government Association through its Coun- 
cil in conjunction with the Dean of Women and the Administrative 
Deans. Each woman student upon registering becomes a member of 
this Association, and is expected to attend the meetings and vote in 
its elections. 

UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICE AND 
CRAWFORD W. LONG INFIRMARY 

The Infirmary is under the supervision of the University Physician, 
and is provided with experienced nurses. The health service extends 
from the official opening to the official closing of each quarter. The 
daily service extends from 8 a. m. to 8 p. m. If the University 
Physician should be absent during these hours the nurse in charge 
will render the necessary first aid and, if necessary, will call the 
University Physician. Should a student consult another physician 
he will do so at his own expense. Under no circumstances will the 
University be responsible for such consultation. 

The heath service functions primarily in guarding against in- 
fectious disease and remedial incipient ill health. It now includes 
vaccination against smallpox, which is required on entrance to the 
University, unless the prospective student has the scar of successful 
vaccination; typhoid inoculation, which is elective; a physical ex- 
amination upon entrance, with advice to student and parent about 
any physical defect that may be found. In addition an effort i3 
made to keep up with the physical condition of the student during 
the entire period of his college life. 

REGULATIONS 

Students in need of medical attention are expected to report to 
the Infirmary for treatment. Whenever a student is seriously ill the 
parents are notified. If an operation is necessary the parents are 
consulted by telephone or wire by the Dean of Adminstraton or 
the University Physician before any procedures are instituted. If it 
is necessary to send a student to a hospital, this expense must be 
borne by the student or parent. 

A hospitalization fee of $1.50 per day is charged for each day 
a student is confined to the Infirmary. No charge is made for con- 
sultation service when a student sees the University Physician at 



40 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

the Infirmary. When the Physician visits a student at a dor- 
mitory or rooming house, a fee of $2.00 is charged. 

Only those students who pay the full registration fees are entitled 
to the benefits of the Health Service. 

After absence from class due to illness a student is not re-ad- 
mitted without a clearance certificate obtained from the University 
Physician. This certificate is issued only to those students who have 
been under observation of the Health Service. Those students who 
receive care at home or afield from the campus, must, to secure a 
certificate, report for approval to the Health Service on the first 
day of the absence. In this manner a record of all student sickness 
is used as a guide for health supervision. 

MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS 

All students registering in the University must take the medical 
examination. This may be taken at any time as scheduled preceding 
registration in the fall. Upperclassmen must take the examination 
before registering. Students registering late may make an appoint- 
ment to take this examination within a reasonable period. These 
examinations are free if taken during the registration days. For 
an examination at a later date a fee of $5.00 may be charged. 

All applicants must have been successfully vaccinated against 
smallpox or must be vaccinated before they register. 



ADMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY 

METHODS OF ADMISSION 

Applicants for admission to the University should be at least 16 
years of age, of good moral character, and adequately prepared. 
Entrance may be obtained in four ways: 

1. By presenting a certificate of graduation from an accredited 
high school with the recommendation of the principal. 

2. By passing entrance examinations, provided the applicant has 
not been in an accredited high school the previous year. 

3. By qualifying as a special student, provided the applicant has 
not been in an accredited high school the previous year. 

4. By submitting a transcript of studies successfully pursued at 
another college or university. 

I. ENTRANCE BY CERTIFICATE 

Certificates for admission will be accepted from graduates of ac- 
credited secondary schools when made on official blanks and prop- 
erly signed by the superintendent or principal. Academic require- 
ments for the University's approval of these certificates are stated 
in terms of units, each representidng a year's study of a subject in a 
standard secondary school. Acceptable grades are required in 15 
units as follows: 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

LIST 1 — Required of All Applicants. 

Group I. English 3 units 

Group II. Social Studies (history, economics, civics, so- 
ciology) 2 units 

Group III. Mathematics (one unit must be in algebra or in 
a general mathematics course including al- 
gebra) 2 units 

Group IV. Science 1 unit 

Total 8 units 

LIST 2 — Electives (to complete 15 units). 

From the five academic groups (I English, II Social Studies, 

III Mathematics, IV Science, V Foreign Language) 4 units 

From the vocational and avocational groups (VI Agriculture, 
Home Economics, Commercial) or (VII Art, Music, 
Physical Education) or from any of the seven 
groups 3 or 4 units 

Minimum for entrance 15 units 

[ 41 ] 



£2 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

For required units for candidates for certain specific degrees see 
notes below: 

English Note: Any student who shows that his high school prepara- 
tion in English Composition is inadequate may be required to take 
a non-credit course. This applies to all degrees. 

Note as to Mathematics: It is recommended that the units in 
Mathematics include at least one in algebra and one in plane geom- 
etry. For certain degrees requiring work in trigonometry or analyt- 
ical geometry, such as Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Science in 
Chemistry, Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering, and 
other degrees for those who major interest is in mathematics, phys- 
ics, or chemistry, one unit of plane geometry is essential. 

Note as to Foreign Language: While foreign language is not an 
absolute entrance requirement for any degree course in the Univer- 
sity, it is recommended and expected that a minimum of two units 
be presented by those who would be candidates for degrees in the 
College of Arts and Sciences, the School of Journalism, the School 
of Commerce, the School of Pharmacy, the School of Law, the pre- 
medical course. For the Bachelor of Arts degree at least two units 
in Latin should be presented for entrance. 

Students entering with no units in foreign language or with only 
one unit will find it necessary to take an extra number of foreign 
language courses in College for those degrees in which foreign lan- 
guage is a requirement. 

Students who show two units a foreign language on their high 
school transcript cannot take the first two beginning courses in 
that language for college credit. 

General Regulations: Certificates will not be accepted for less 
than one year's attendance in the school/ issuing the certificate. Stu- 
dents entering from an accredited senior high school must present 
twelve acceptable units and three additional units from the last 
year of the junior high school. Transcripts from accredited senior 
high schools must show fifteen acceptable units as enumerated above. 
The University reserves the right to reject any applicant whose low 
record indicates that he is not prepared to do successful college 
work, even though he meets the entrance requirements cited above. 

The certificate should be mailed directly to The University of 
Georgia, care of the Registrar, by the school official authorized to 
send it. All subjects not certified should be crossed out. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 43 

ACCREDITED HIGH SCHOOLS 

The University recognizes all four-year public high schools and all 
private secondary schools which are fullly accredited by the High 
School Commission of Georgia. Entrance credits will also be ac- 
cepted on certificate from the following sources: (a) from schools 
accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools, (b) from schools accredited by the North Central Associa- 
tion of Colleges and Secondary Schools, (c) from schools approved 
by the New England College Entrance Certificate Board, (d) from 
high schools registered by the Regents of the University of the 
State of New York, and (e) from schools accredited by other re- 
gional associations of Colleges and Secondary Schools. 

2. ADMISSION BY EXAMINATION 

Applicants for admission who do not present satisfactory certifi- 
cates from secondary schools may be admitted to the University by 
passing entrance examinations. 

Examinations are held at the University in June and September 
of each year. 

The scope of these examinations will depend upon the previous 
preparation of the applicants. Students desiring to be examined 
for entrance to the University should send to the Registrar an out- 
line of their academic training and experience. The Registrar will 
notify the applicant of the fields of knowledge which the entrance 
examination will embrace. 

3. ADMISSION AS A SPECIAL STUDENT 

Applicants for admission, not candidates for a degree, who have 
not had the opportunity to complete a satisfactory high school 
course, but who, by reason of special preparation and attainments, 
may be qualified to take certain courses, may enter as special stu- 
dents. 

The purpose of this provision for special students is to enable 
young men and women (a) who are beyond the school age and (b) 
who have had practical experience to secure training along special 
special lines when they are properly prepared for the work. 

It is specifically emphasized that mere attainment of any given 
age does not constitute adequate preparation for admission as a 
special student, but no person under twenty-one years of age will 
be admitted to this status. 

Graduates of an accredited high school are not admitted as special 
students. In general, a student failing to graduate from a high 



44 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

school will not be admitted to the University, if he has been in 
attendance in the high school during the previous year. 

Special students are not eligible to take part in student activities 
or to be initiated into a fraternity or sorority. 

The University has no special courses as such; all courses are 
organized for regular students — students who have had the equiv- 
alent of a good high school education. Special students are admit- 
te to those regular courses for which, in the judgment of the in- 
structor, they have satisfactory preparation. Such students may 
be admitted under the following conditions: (a) they will not be 
admitted to subjects for which entrance examinations are required, 
unless they pass such examinations; (b) they must give evidence of 
adequate preparation for the courses sought to the individual pro- 
fessor in charge; (c) they must submit in advance to the Registrar 
all available certified records for previous school work and an ap- 
plication for admission showing (1) the kind of work desired, (2) 
the reasons for desiring such work, and (3) if no credits can be 
presented, a detailed statement of any previous educational work 
and practical experience, with a list of subjects in which the candi- 
date is prepared to take entrance examinations. 

Special blanks for this information are provided by the Registrar. 

Should a special student subsequently become a candidate for a 
degree, he will be required to satisfy the full fifteen units of en- 
trance requirements, at least one year before the time he proposes 
to graduate. 

IRREGULAR STUDENTS 

The, general policy of the University is not to allow students who 
can meet the entrance requirements (especially those under 21 years 
of age) to take irregular programs of work. In particular the Uni- 
versity does not offer two-year terminal programs in vocational or 
professional work; all curricula are organized on a four-year basis. 
However, the first two years of all curricula are designed, so far as 
practicable, to give the student who drops out after two years' work 
an educational program of value. 

4. ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

Two groups of students may be admitted to advanced standing in 
the University: (1) students transferring from accredited colleges 
and universities who have pursued college courses equivalent to 
those of The University of, Georgia, and (2) graduates of accredited 
institutions who wish to pursue graduate study at the University. 
Requirements for these groups follow: 



GENERAL INFORMATION 45 

TRANSER STUDENTS 

Any student entering from another college or university must pre- 
sent an official transcript adopted by the Georgia colleges, or its 
equivalent, showing in detail entrance units, college work already 
accomplished, and honorable dismissal. The official transcript 
should be accompanied by a current catalogue describing the courses 
for which credit is sought. No transcript will be finally accepted, 
except after verification by the issuing institution, other than those 
coming directly from the institution. 

Advanced students must in general enter the University not later 
than the beginning of the senior year. In determining their posi- 
tion in the University, however, the value of the work done in 
another college, as well as the work offered for entrance at that 
college, will be measured by University standards. 

Upon request, the Registrar will send information concerning the 
conditions under which transfer credits can be accepted from the 
colleges in Georgia. 

As a rule, students entering from institutions not members of the 
Southern Association of Colleges, or other regional associations of 
equal standing, cannot expect to transfer on transcript more than 
106 quarter-hours towards the 19 6 quarter-hours required for a 
degree. 

Advanced standing is granted by examination, unless the appli- 
cant is from an approved institution. 

The number of credits transferred from another institution can- 
not exceed the normal number of credits allowed at the University 
for the same period of time. Not more than one-fourth of the 
transferred credits can be in the lowest group passing grade at the 
institution from which transferred. 

A student who has been dropped from another institution for 
delinquency in studies will be admitted in the University only after 
a careful investigation of the record. In general he cannot be ad- 
mitted before the time the institution from which he was dropped 
will readmit him. 

All courses taken in schools or colleges of pharmacy holding mem- 
bership in The American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy which 
parallel our courses will be accepted for full credit. 

It is possible for students to complete one year of work in a rec- 
ognized Junior College and be admitted to the sophomore class of 
the School of Pharmacy. The same applies to students who transfer 
from other schools in the University. It has been our experience, 
however, that it is preferable that a student spend the entire four 



46 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

years in the School of Pharmacy, and have the advantage of its 
direction and guidance as to courses to be taken. Beginning in Jan- 
uary, 1938, the member schools of the American Association of Col- 
leges of Pharmacy require a student, regardless of his credits, to 
spend a minimum of three years in the School of Pharmacy. 

Correspondence with reference to credits for advanced standing 
should be addresse to the Registrar. 

EXEMPTIONS FROM DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR TRANSFER 

STUDENTS 

The first two years of a majority of the University curricula in- 
clude to a large degree survey courses in the Social Sciences, the 
Humanities, Mathematics, and the Natural Sciences instead of the 
subject matter courses in these fields offered in a great many col- 
leges. 

In the cases of students who transfer from standard colleges 
without these survey courses, provisions are made for a substitu- 
tion of specific subject matter courses in the general fields of the 
surveys for the survey requirements. 

Students who transfer to the University with Junior standing are 
exempt from the requirement of Military Science 1-2 and Physical 
Education 1-2 (for women). 

In general, the Senior Division curricula are arranged so that a 
student who has completed the freshman and sophomore years at a 
standard institution with proper quality points can complete the de- 
gree requirements for all except the very technical degrees in two 
years (six quarters). 

In some degrees certain modifications are made in required courses 
for transfer students. For these modifications see degree require- 
ments. 

SUBSTITUTIONS FOR THE SURVEY COURSES 

Students who have reached Senior Division standing will not, in 
general, be required to register for the survey courses: Social Science 
1 a-b-c, Humanities 1 a-b-c, Human Biology 1-2, and Physical Sci- 
ence 1-2. For a student who reaches Senior Division standing with- 
out having received credit for required survey courses, substitutions 
will be made of courses carrying equal credit in the same general 
field; substitutions for Social Science 1 a-b-c must be from geography, 
economics, history, political science, philosophy, sociology; substi- 
substitutions for Humanities 1 a-b-c must be from English literature 
or the fine arts; substitutions for Human Biology 1-2 must be from 
botany or zoology; substitutions for Physical Science 1-2 must be 



GENERAL INFORMATION 47 

from astronomy, chemistry, geology, physics. However, students 
who transfer credit in laboratory science of at least 20' hours will 
be exempt from Human Biology 1-2 and Physical Science 1-2. 

MINIMUM RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS 

As to time — Three quarters work in The University of Georgia in 
Athens, except that for teachers of experience and maturity the 
residence requirement may be satisfied by a minimum of twenty- 
seven weeks. 

As to credits earned — A minimum of Senior Division courses 
carrying credit for 45 quarter-hours must be completed in residence, 
and, unless otherwise allowed by the University authorities, they 
must be the last 45 hours taken before graduation. In some cases 
this requirement is met if the minimum of 45 hours in residence is 
among the last 6 5 hours required for graduation. 

At least one-half of the hours required in the major concentration 
subject and in the major division must be completed in Senior Di- 
vision residence courses. 

In some cases students who have been in residence nine quarters 
and have completed at least three-fourths of their degree rquire- 
ments with quality point average in residence are allowed to take 
the remainder of their program at other approved institutions with 
the approval in advance of the Dean of Administration. 

ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Graduates of institutions accredited by the University may be ad- 
mitted to the Graduate School upon the presentation of a certificate 
of graduation and an official transcript of all courses already taken. 
The status of the institution is to be ascertained from the Registrar. 
Graduates from non-accredited institutions are advised to secure a 
bachelor's degree from an accredited institution. However, in par- 
ticular cases they may be admitted to the Graduate School on the 
basis of additional work before admission to full graduate standing. 

Admission to the Graduate School does not necessarily imply 
admission to candidacy for a degree. A student is not admitted to 
candidacy for a graduate degree until he has fulfilled all the pre- 
requisites of the degree which he seeks and of the particular courses 
which constitute his program. 

Should a student desire to take a course for which his undergrad- 
uate work has not offered sufficient preparation, he will be required 
to pursue the requisite studies as determined by the individual pro- 
fessor of the course. 



48 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Graduate students before coming to the University must furnish 
a certificate of graduation to be filed with the Registrar and an of- 
ficial transcript for the inspection of the Dean and their major pro- 
fessors. 

A student who is doubtful as to his eligibility for admission to 
the Graduate School should correspond with the Dean of the Grad- 
uate School before coming to Athens. 

ADMISSION TO THE SCHOOL OF LAW 

An applicant for admission to the School of Law as a candidate for 
the degree of Bachelor of Laws must present satisfactory evidence of 
the fact that he is a graduate of a college of approved standing or 
that he has satisfactorily completed at least two years of regular 
residence work at such college, constituting not less than one-half 
of the work acceptable for a Bachelor's degree granted on the basis 
of a! four-year period of study. Courses in military science or phys- 
ical education and courses without intellectual content of substan- 
tial value will not be considered by the School of Law in determining 
whether the applicant has completed one-half of the work required 
for a Bachelor's degree. 

The School of Law admits both men and women students as can- 
didates for degrees. 

PRE-LAW 

While the University has no prescribed pre-law course, all stu- 
dents intending to enter the School of Law later are requested to in- 
dicate this at the time of registration by the notation "pre-law." 
All students entering the Law School from the University are re- 
quired to complete the Junior Division requirements for one of the 
University degrees. As electives the following are recommended: 
General Economics (Economics 5 or Economics 55 a-b-c), History 
of England (History 4), American Government (History 1), Ele- 
mentary Psychology (Psychology 1), and Speech 50. 

SIX-YEAR COMBINED CURRICULA 

There are combined courses of Arts and Law, Sciences and Law 
and Commerce and Law leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts 
(see page 88), Bachelor of Sciences (see page 91) and Bachelor of 
Science in Commerce (see page 112) and Bachelor of Laws, so that 
both undergraduate and law degrees may be obtained in six years. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 49 

REGISTRATION INFORMATION 

Permit to Register. Before a student may be admitted to registra- 
tion lie must secure from the Registrar a permit that he is qualified 
to register in the University. 

A former student not in good standing because of unsatisfactory 
work or for other reasons, may not register except upon the permis- 
sion of the Dean of Administration. 

No woman student may register unless approved by the Dean of 
Women. 

PROCEDURE OF REGISTRATION 

Instructions for registration will be issued to each registrant in 
Academic Building at the time of registration. Failure to follow the 
procedure for registration will result in confusion and delay, and 
may cause the student to pay the late registration fee. A student 
is not registered until his fees are paid. 

SCHEDULE OF STUDIES 

At the time of registration the student receives a slip showing 
his schedule of studies for the quarter. A duplicate of this sched- 
ule properly filled out and approved, for Junior Division students by 
the proper registration officer and for Senior Division students by 
the professor in charge of the major subject and the Dean of the 
college, must be filed with the Registrar at the time of registration. 
A student will not receive credit for any work for which he has not 
been properly registered. 

Students who are in residence at the University during the Spring 
Quarter must present their schedules of studies and courses for the 
following year on or before the day announced by the Faculty. Stu- 
dents who fail to comply with this regulation will be assessed a fine 
of $3.00. 

ENROLLMENT IN CLASSES 

Notice from the Registrar that a student has registered for a cer- 
tain class at a certain hour is the only authority for his admission 
to the class by an instructor. Changes in the student's assignment 
cannot be made by the instructor. No change can be authorized 
except by the Dean of Administration and notice of such changes 
must go from the Registrar to the instructor. 



50 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

FRESHMAN WEEK 
Freshman Week is devoted to efforts to help freshmen get a right 
start. It facilitates the process of adjustment which freshmen must 
pass through; it helps them to understand why they are in college, 
and it brings them immediately in contact with their advisers. The 
University, therefore, requires freshmen to report for a part of the 
week before classes begin. 

REQUIRED ATTENDANCE 

Attendance from September 20 to 25 is a requirement. 
During this particular period, known as Freshman Week, the stu- 
dent will: 

(a) Make his plans for rooming and boarding. 

(b) Take a medical examination. 

(c) Complete his registration and payment of fees. 

(d) Receive his schedule of classes. 

(e) Take such tests as may be required. These tests include com- 
prehensive examinations in the fields of social science, Eng- 
lish, mathematics and natural science and are used for guid- 
ance purposes, exemption from certain courses and place- 
ment in class sections. 

(f) Get acquainted with the campus, buildings, recitation rooms, 
library, and other points of interest. 

(g) Attend lectures by members of the Faculty, designated to ac- 
quaint him with requirements, and special lectures on student 
traditions. 

(h) Attend social gatherings in the evenings arranged by the 
University Voluntary Religious Association. 

All freshmen are required to be present at all appointments com- 
prising the program of Freshman Week. Physical examinations and 
other preliminares to registration begin Friday, September 20, at 
9:00 a. m. The first assembly for freshmen is held September 20 
at 8:00 p. m. in the University Chapel. All freshmen must have re- 
ported to the Dean of Men before this time and attend this meeting. 

Administrative officers, Faculty, specially selected upperclassmen, 
the Director and members of the Voluntary Religious Association, 
all co-operate to make Freshman Week attractive, instructive, and 
beneficial to entering students. 

PLACEMENT TESTS 

During Freshman Week all freshmen will be required to take gen- 
eral tests in English, history, science, and information of the ad 
ministration in its counselling service and for placement in class 
sections. At the, end of the sophomore year before a student enters 
the Senior Division other tests in the same fields will be given to 



GENERAL INFORMATION 51 



show the student's progress. Make-up tests will be given during 
the quarter for all students who have failed for any reason to take 
the first test. Any student without a satisfactory excuse for not 
having taken the first test will be charged a special fee of $1.00 
for the make-up test. 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

All fees, deposits, room rent and board must be paid in advance 
at the beginning of each quarter. Until this has been done, the stu- 
dent will not be considered as regularly matriculated, and cards 
entitling him to admission to classes will not be issued. 

Matriculation fees, room and board may be paid by check in exact 
amounts. Money orders, express or travelers' checks should be car- 
ried for emergency purposes, as these are easily cashed. It would 
be advisable for students to bring their money in this form and 
deposit it in a local bank. Students should come prepared to pay 
fees and other expenses on the day they register. Payment of fees 
will not be accepted prior to registration dates and a student must 
appear in person to register. Registration icill not be completed until 
expenses have been paid. 

A service fee of $2.00 will be collected from all students who, in 
any quarter for any reason, complete registration after the official 
registration days. 

All rates, including matriculation fees, room, and board, are sub- 
ject to revision at the end of any quarter. 

Cost of an education is determined somewhat by the student's 
personal expense including room, board, laundry, clothing, trans- 
portation, amusements, and varied incidental expenditures. Lab- 
oratory fees vary according to courses. 

The following tables will give an approximation of the "fixed" 
expenses for a resident of Georgia. 

ESTIMATED EXPENSES 

(Men) 

Low High 

Tuition .....$142.50 $1 42.50 

Pees — 

Laboratory k „_ 7.50 22.50 

Breakage deposit 15.00 30.00 

Military 10. 00 1 25. 00 2 

Books 30.00 45.00 



Total $345.00 $505.00 



1 Freshman and Sophomore fee. 

2 Junior and Senior fee. 



52 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

(Women) 
(Freshmen and Sophomores) 

Low High 

Tuition, room, board, laundry $370.50 $370.50 

Fees — 

Laboratory 7.50 22.50 

Breakage deposit 15.00 30.00 

Books 30.00 45.00 



Total $423.00 $468.00 

(Juniors and Seniors) 

Low High 

Tuition $142.50 $142.50 

Room, board and laundry 277.50 277.50 

Fees — 

Laboratory 7.50 22.50 

Breakage deposit 15.00 30.00 

Books r 30.00 45.00 



M $472.50 $517.50 

RESIDENT STUDENTS 

All students in the University (other than in the Law School and 
the Co-ordinate College under conditions explained later), residents 
of Georgia, pay, each quarter in advance, a matriculation fee of 
$47.50. All students in the Law School pay each quarter in ad- 
vance, a matriculation fee of $60.00. All women students residing 
on the Co-ordinate College campus, pay, each quarter in advance, 
a fee of $123.50, which includes room, board, matriculation fee and 
laundry. All students attending the Co-ordinate College who are 
not residing on the campus, pay, each quarter in advance, a ma- 
triculation fee of $47.50. 

NON-RESIDENT FEES 

All students not legal residents of the State of Georgia are re- 
quired to pay $132.00 per year in addition to the regular fees 
charged resident students. This non-resident fee may be appor- 
tioned equally among the three quarters of the academic year. 

If there is any possible question of a student's right to legal res- 
idence, he should bring the matter to the attention of the Registrar 
who should pass upon the question before registration and payment 
of fees. Any intentional evasion of the above regulation shall sub- 
ject the student to a dismissal or other disciplinary action. 

No person shall be considered eligible to register in the University 
as a legal resident of the State of Georgia unless he or she has been 



GENERAL INFORMATION 53 

a bona fide resident in the State for twelve months preceding the 
date of his or her original matriculation. A non-resident student, 
who is 21 years of age or more may become a resident student, after 
attending the University for one year, or more, after having attained 
the age of 21 years, by clearly establishing that his previous residence 
has been abandoned and a new one established in Georgia for pur- 
poses other than attending the University. The place of a student's 
legal residence or of his bona* fide intention to be a resident of the 
State of Georgia may be established by a satisfactory statement under 
oath before the Registrar. 

Minors, whose legal residence follows that of parents or guar- 
dians, shall not be considered to have gained the status of resident 
students until twelve months after the parent or guardian has estab- 
lished his or her residence in Georgia, nor shall the appointment of 
a resident guardian give a non-resident minor the status of a res- 
ident student until twelve months after both the appointment and 
the ward's presence in the State of Georgia. 

Minors, whose parents or guardians have abandoned their resi- 
dence in the State of Georgia, shall lose their status as resident 
students at the end of the academic year following such abandon- 
ment. 

OTHER FEES 

Laboratory Fees. Students working in laboratories pay fees vary- 
ing from $1.00 to $7.50 each quarter in advance to cover materials, 
apparatus, breakage, and damages. 

Extra Course Fees. A service fee of $2.00 per quarter-hour credit 
is charged for all credit hours taken in excess of 18 hours per quar- 
ter. A student taking courses of 21 hours credit would pay $6.00 
per quarter in addition to the regular matriculation fee. 

Military Fees. A deposit of $12.50 to cover partial cost of uniform 
and textbook is required of Junior Division men students upon regis- 
tration. Upon completion of the double course, when the University 
has received reimbursement from the Federal Government, the above 
deposit, less deductions for any lost equipment, cost of textbook and 
maintenance, is returned to the student, the uniform remaining the 
property of the University. Students who drop Military Science 
before having completed the basic course are required to return the 
uniform and are not refunded the $12.50. A deposit of $25.00 to 
cover cost of special uniform, text, etc., is required of all Senior 
Division students registering for their first year in the advanced 
course. All students enrolled in the R. O. T. C. Advanced Course 
receive a clothing allowance of $29.00 for the first year and $7.00 
for the second year; commutation of subsistence at the rate of 25 



£4 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

cents per day for the entire period of enrollment with the exception 
of the six weeks at camp. One camp of six weeks is required at the 
end of thg junior year, Advanced Course. All expenses to and from 
camp are paid. While at camp students are furnished meals free of 
cost and receive in addition thereto pay at the rate of 70 cents per 
day. Students satisfactorily completing the advanced course are of- 
fered commissions as second lieutenants in the Officers Reserve 
Corps. Students taking the course without commutation may, by 
attending either an R. O. T. C. or C. M. T. Camp, obtain commis- 
sion in the Officers Reserve Corps. 

SPECIAL FEES 

Re-registration Fee. When checks given for payment of money 
due the University are not paid on presentation at bank, and if a 
student does not meet his financial obligations on dates specified by 
the Treasurer, registration will be cancelled and receipt given con- 
sidered null and void. A penalty of $3.00 will be charged for for 
re-registration. 

Transcript Fee. Each student who has discharged all his financial 
obligations to the University shall be entitled to receive on request, 
without charge, one transcript of his record, but a charge of $1.00 
is made for each additional transcript. 

Diploma Fee. The diploma fee is $5.00. 

Special Examination Fee. For any special examination a fee of 
$2.00 may be charged. Special examinations will be granted in ex- 
ceptional cases only and by authority of the Dean of Administration. 

FEE REFUNDS 

Students withdrawing from the University within ten days of the 
date on which they paid their fees and registered are entitled to a 
refund of the amount assessed, less $5.00. Laboratory breakage 
deposits and military deposits are refunded in such amounts as the 
heads of the respective departments may indicate. Students with- 
drawing after ten days and before the beginning of the second term 
of each quarter will receive one-half of the fund assessed, less $5.00; 
students withdrawing later than that date will not be refunded any 
part of their fees, except in case of illness certified to by the Uni- 
versity Physician. 

No refunds of any nature will foe made except at the end of a 
quarter. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 55 

ROOM AND BOARD REFUNDS 

Students withdrawing from the University will be charged a daily 
rate for room and board to the date of withdrawal. The remainder 
of their payments will be refunded at the end of the quarter. 

Payments on room and board will not be refunded to students 
moving to other lodgings during the quarter in which such payments 
are made, unless such removal is made upon the advice of the Uni- 
versity Physician. 

LIVING FACILITIES 
DORMITORIES FOR WOMEN 

The campus of the Co-ordinate College has the following dormi- 
tories: 

Bradwell Hall, Gilmer Hall, Miller Hall, Winnie Davis Memorial 
Hall, Senior Hall, and Cobb Home; and a dining hall sufficiently 
large to accommodate all the students rooming in the dormitories. 

Each building is under the care of a house director, who acts in 
the capacity of mother for the girls in her care. These women are 
cultured, well-educated, and deeply interested in the welfare of the 
girls. They are chosen with the end in view of providing the finest 
and most symapthetic contacts for the girls and of insuring their 
personal and social well-being and happiness. 

The dining hall is under the personal supervision of a trained and 
experienced dietitian, and the girls' needs are the subject of her con- 
stant} concern. The remarkable health record of the girls who have 
been under her care testifies to her ability and success. 

All students living in the Co-ordinate College dormitories eat 
in the Co-ordinate College dining room. If any student requires a 
special diet, on the specification of a physician, approved by the 
University Physician, the diet will be provided by the college at an 
added cost determined by the specific diet. No refunds will be 
made for meals taken off the campus. 

Soule Hall, Mary Lyndon Hall, the New Dormitory, and Lucy Cobb 
are dormitories for Senior Division women. These dormitories are 
all excellently equipped, and offer as fine accommodations for women 
students as can be had in any college. A few rooms have private 
baths. These may be secured at slight additional cost. Students 
living in Soule Hall, Mary Lyndon Hall, and the New Dormitory 
have their meals in the new cafeteria, which is one of the most 
modern and perfectly appointed cafeterias in the South. Students 
living at Lucy Cobb have their meals in the historic dining room 
which has served so many of Georgia's notable women. The old 



56 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

charm of this famous school is carefully maintained, and it is one 
of the most popular of all the dormitories for women. 

All dormitory rooms are equipped with dressers, tables, chairs, 
single beds, mattresses, and shades. No curtains or rugs are pro- 
vided. Students should bring the following articles: 

Not less than two pairs of single bed sheets; two pairs of pillow 
cases; one pillow; blankets; comforts; two counterpanes; two dress- 
er covers, approximately 18x40 inches; and any personal belongings 
desired for their own pleasure, such as colored curtains and rugs. 
Windows in almost all instances are standard, and the regular sized 
2*4 yard curtains will suit windows in all instances except where 
a student is advised to the contrary when assigned to a room. 

Sorority Houses. A large number of sophomore, Senior Division 
and graduate school women live in houses operated by the various 
sororities under the general supervision of the Dean of Women. 

DORMITORIES FOR MEN 

There are five dormitories for men: Old College for juniors and 
seniors; Joseph E. Brown, Milledge Hall, Candler Hall, and Clark 
Howel Hall for all classes. Camp Wilkins, on the Agricultural Col- 
lege campus, is operated on a co-operative basis by students, and offers 
room and board at low rates. 

Rooms in the dormitories are furnished with chairs, beds, tables 
and dressers. Students should bring linen for a| single bed, blan- 
kets, towels, pillow, and such personal belongings as might be 
desired. 

The dormitories and dining halls are in charge of the Superin- 
tendent of Dormitories and Dining Halls and a committee composed 
of Faculty members and students. The rules and regulations pre- 
scribed by this committee are enforced through proctors placed 
over each division of the dormitories. 

Denmark Dining Hall is under the immediate supervision of the 
Superintendent of Dormitories and Dining Halls. The food is well 
cooked, is efficiently served by student waiters, and is adequate as 
to quality and quantity. 

PRIVATE BOARD AND LODGING FOR! MEN 

The charges for private rooms vary with the character of the 
furnishings. Men board at Denmark Dining Hall or the Agricul- 
tural College Cafeteria, or they can secure private table board. A 
number of families in the city offer board and lodging. The Uni- 
versity cannot agree to engage rooms in private families. A list of 



GENERAL INFORMATION 57 

those desiring boarders or having rooms to rent will be given on 
application, but the student must make his own arrangements. 

Fraternity Houses. A large number of men live in houses operated 
by the various fraternities under the general supervision of the 
Dean of Men. 

ROOM AND BOARD 

Dormitories and Dining Halls. Dormitory and dining hall fees 
for both men and women are payable quarterly in advance, unless 
otherwise noted. These rates are as follows: 

Women — 

Co-ordinate College: Room, board and laundry are included with 
matriculation fee in the total amount of $123.50 per quarter. 

Dormitories for Senior Division: Students in the Senior Division 
pay $92.50 per quarter for room, board and laundry. This does 
not include matriculation fee. 

Men — 

Brown and Milledge Dormitories (Room and Laundry) 

First quarter - $36.00 

Second quarter 32.00 

Third quarter 32.00 

$100.00 

Clark Howell Dormitory: (Room and Laundry) 

First quarter $28.50 

Second quarter 24.75 

Third quarter 24.75 

$ 78.00 

Old College and Candler Hall: (Room and Laundry) 

Two to Three to 
Room Room 

First quarter $24.00 $21.00 

Second quarter 22.00 19.50 

Third quarter 22.00 19.50 

Totals $68.00 $60.00 

Camp Wilkins: (Room and Board) 

Room and Board 

Board Only 

First quarter $45.00 $39.00 

Second quarter 38.50 33.75 

Third quarter 38.50 33.75 

Totals $122.00 $106.50 

Denmark Dining Hall: (Board Only) 

Service in Denmark is cafeteria style. The average cost per month 
is approximately $18.00. Meal tickets, on which a discount will be 
given, may be secured at the Treasurer's office. 

All rates, including matriculation fees, room and board are sub- 
ject to revision at the beginning of any quarter. 



58 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Since the dormitories and dining halls are operated under a sys- 
tem of fixed charges, moving from dormitories or dining halls can- 
not be permitted, except at the end of the quarter. 

Applications for rooms in the girls' dormitories should be made 
to the Dean of Women. Application for boys' dormitories should be 
made to the Superintendent of Dormitories and Dining Halls. A 
reservation deposit of $10.00 is necessary to reserve a room in any 
dormitory. This deposit will be refunded if requested on or before 
September 15. No reservation fee will be refunded after this date. 

UNIVERSITY LAUNDRY 

The University now operates a laundry for the service of its stu- 
dents. The quarterly charge made per domitory room includes an 
allowance of approximately fifty cents per week for laundry. For 
this amount, which is about one-half the commercial rate, a student 
is entitled to have laundered weekly the following articles: 

Men — 5 shirts, 6 pair sox, 3 undershirts, 3 shorts, 2 sheets, 1 pillow 
case, 6 handkerchiefs, 1 bath cloth, 5 towels, 1 pair pajamas. 

Women — 2 sheets, 1 pillow case, 6 handkerchiefs, 5 towels, 2 bath 
cloths, 2 wash dresses or 3 shirts, 1 pair pajamas or night gown, 1 
slip. 

OPPORTUNITIES FOR SELF-HELP 

A considerable number of students secure employment to aid them 
in their education. Some students of Agriculture are able to secure 
work on the college farm. In a few instances other departments 
need the services of students. Usually these places go to those who 
have been in attendance for some time, and who are known to be 
willing, capable, and trustworthy. The University does not assume 
any responsibility whatever in this matter. As a matter of accommo- 
dation the Personnel Office of the University co-operates as far as 
possible by helping students to secure emplpoyment. Very much 
depends, however, on the individual's power of initiative. Students 
should not come to the University expecting others to find places 
for them. 

To earn a living and at the same time carry the work of a college 
course planned to occupy a student's full time is more than most 
students can accomplish. In a few instances they have succeeded, 
but as a rule students who attempt more than partial self-support 
should expect to lengthen their term of study. 

For the last six years the Federal Emergency Relief Administra- 
tion and the National Youth Administration have co-operated with 
the University in offering work for students. At the time of pub- 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



lication of this bulletin, it is not certain that this aid will be con- 
tinued for another year, but there is a good probability that it will 
be continued. Under this fund freshman students who show a su- 
perior scholastic record from the high school and other students 
who have a high grade college record are eligible for jobs. The 
following are the requirements as set forth by the NYA: (1) Each 
student shall be absolutely in need of this or other aid in order to 
continue in college; (2) Students helped must have demonstrated 
their ability to do high grade scholastic work; and (3) Students 
must be able to render efficient service for the aid received. The 
sum allowed each student under this fund is about $12.00 per 
month. All applications for appointment to NYA work should be 
addressed to Mrs. Dorothy S. Whitehead, NYA Supervisor in the 
Personnel Office. 

SCHOLARSHIP AND LOAN FUNDS 

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR FIRST HONOR GRADUATES 

By authority of the Regents of the University System of Georgia, 
first honor graduates of accredited high schools in Georgia receive 
scholarships for one year. This scholarship, which must be used 
during the academic year immediately following high school grad- 
uation, amounts to $125.00 per year. 

Notification that a student is a first honor graduate must be 
given the President of the University in writing by the school prin- 
cipal or superintendent. 

DISTRICT COMPETITIVE SCHOLARSHIPS 

Based upon a competitive examination in each Congressional Dis- 
trict of the state, a two-year scholarship ($125.00 per year) is 
given each of the 10 first place winners and a one-year scholarship 
given each of the 10 second place winners. Continuation of the 
scholarship for first place winners during the second year will de- 
pend upon the student's ranking in the upper 15 per cent of his 
class at the end of his freshman year. 

These examinations are open to seniors or graduates of accredited 
or non-accredited Georgia high schools provided he or she is a 
resident of Georgia, has not attended any college, and did not take 
the examination the previous year. 

Similar to comprehensive examinations now used in much college 
survey work, these examinations cover English — reading and vo- 
cabulary, grammar, spelling, punctuation, usage; Mathematics — 



60 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

arithmetic, algebra, finance; General Science — biology, chemistry, 
physics, astronomy, geology. 

Persons wishing to take this examination should write Mrs. Dor- 
othy S. Whitehead, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, 
before April 1, since an application blank must be filled out and 
returned before April 15. 

[Unless otherwise specified all loan and scholarship funds below 
are open to males only.] 

To apply for a loan Agricultural College students should write to 
Prof. J. C. Bell, College of Agriculture, and all other students 
should write Mrs. Mary B. Bondurant, Personnel Officer, The Uni- 
versity of Georgia. Complete information and application forms 
will be furnished on request. Applications for loans should be 
filed by July 1 of each year. Applications are passed upon in July 
or August by the Faculty Committee on Loans. 

American Bankers Association Loan Fund. Given by American 
Bankers Association Foundation. Open to high ranking seniors in the 
School of Commerce. 

Charles McDonald Brown Scholarship Fund. This endowment 
was established in 1883, by the Hon. Joseph E. Brown, ex-governor 
of Georgia, in memory of his son, Charles McDonald Brown, of the 
Class of 1878, for the purpose of aiding young men in defraying the 
expenses of their education. The interest on this fund is lent to 
worthy young men on condition that they obligate themselves to re- 
turn it with 4 per cent interest. Young men who are preparing 
for the ministry are required to return but one-half of the amount 
borrowed, with interest. The colleges participating in the benefits 
of this fund are: the colleges' at Athens (including the Law School), 
the Medical College at Augusta, and the North Georgia College at 
Dahlonega. The present value of this fund is $371,480.06. 

The Bert Michael Scholarship. About $50.00 a year, the income 
of a fund given by the family of the late Bert Michael, of the Class 
of 1912, to be given to a member of the junior class, selected by 
a committee of the Faculty. Open to men and women. 

The Arkwright Fund. The income of a fund given by Preston S. 
Arkwright, to be lent on the same terms as the Charles McDonald 
Brown Fund. The value of this fund is now $1,334.24. 

The Joseph Henry Lumpkin Scholarship Fund. The income of 
a fund given by Joseph Henry Lumpkin, to be lent on the same 
terms as the Charles McDonald Brown Fund. The value of this 
fund is now $12,027.60. 

The Dodd Fund. The income of a fund given by Eugene Dodd 
('93) and Harry Dodd ('97), to be lent on the same terms as the 



GENERAL INFORMATION 61 

Charles McDonald Brown Fund. This fund now amounts to 
$1,256.80. 

The Brand Fund. For a number of years the late Hon. Charles 
H. Brand gave to the University sums of money to be lent to stu- 
dents residing in the congressional district he represented. This fund 
now amounts to $1,491.65, and as loans are repaid the money can be 
re-lent. 

The Daughters of the American Revolution Fund. The income 
of a fund of $5,000.00 given by the Georgia Division of the Daughters 
of the American Revolution, to be lent on the same terms as the 
Charles McDonald Brown Fund. The present value of this fund is 
$9,304.85. 

The Joe Brown Connally Scholarship in Georgia History. In 
1922 the family of Captain Joe Brown Connally, a graduate of the 
University who lost his life in the World War, established in his 
memory a permanent scholarship to be awarded annually to a mem- 
ber of the junior class for proficiency in Georgia history. The scholar- 
ship yields $100.00 annually. Open to men and women. 

Aaron F. Churchill Fund. Mrs. Lois Churchill and Miss Lottie 
Churchill gave in 1922 to The University of Georgia, the sum of 
$15,000.00 as a memorial to the late Captain A. F. Churchill, of Savan- 
nah. The interest from this fund is to be lent to worthy students, 
men or women. The present value of the fund is $29,193.03. 

Henry W. Brown Fund. The Henry W. Brown Memorial Fund 
was established by the family of the late Captain Brown, who lost 
his life as a result of the World War. The interest is to be lent to 
worthy students. The present value of the fund is $18,939.85. 

W il t ja m Starke Denmark Fund. A gift of the late Brantley A. 
Denmark, in memory of his son, William Starke Denmark. The 
interest is lent to worthy students. The present value of the fund 
is $13,935.72. 

The A. L. Hull Memorial Fund. A gift of $500.00 by Dr. M. M. 
Hull ('91) for the establishment of a loan fund for aiding students. 
This fund now amounts to $617.21. 

Francis Adgate Lipscomb Fund. A gift by Mr. F. A. Lipscomb 
to establish a fund in honor of his father, Francis Adgate Lipscomb, 
who was a professor in the University from 1869 until his death in 
1873, the interest to be lent to worthy students. The present value 
of the fund is $2,102.42. 

Bernice F. Bullard Fund. A gift by Mrs. Bernice F. Bullard of 
$10,000.00 to establish a loan fund in memory of her husband, the late 
Bernice F. Bullard, of Savannah. The present value of this fund is 
$22,665.62. This fund is open to women. 



62 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Moon Fund. A bequest of $2,000.00 by the late Professor A. H. 
Moon, establishing a loan fund in memory of his father and mother. 
It now amounts to $3,416.96. Open to men and women. 

Elijah Clarke D. A. R. Fund. An annual gift of $100.00 by the 
Elijah Clarke Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, 
to establish a loan fund for girls. It now amounts to $1,679.18. 

LrLA Napier Jelks Loan Fund. In January, 1936, the Hawkinsville 
Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, established at the 
University a loan fund of $600.00 which is known as the Lila Napier 
Jelks Loan Fund. This fund is available to junior and senior stu- 
dents whose homes are in Pulaski County. 

Student Loan Fund. A fund established through contributions of 
various students. Repayments of loans make available other loans. 
The funds now amount to $1,242.35. Open to men and women. 

Benjamin Z. Phillips Fund. Mrs. Nettie Elsas Phillips gave to 
the University the sum of $5,000.00 with which to establish the Ben- 
jamin Z. Phillips Law Scholarship Fund in memory of her husband, 
Benjamin Z. Phillips. Loans from the income of this fund are made 
to a member of the second year law class selected by the Law Facul- 
ty. The fund is open to women. It now amounts to $9,881.13. 

Berryman T. Thompson Fund. A gift of $10,000.00 by Mrs. Berry- 
man T. Thompson and Mrs. Garland M. Jones, of Newnan, Georgia, 
to establish this fund in memory of their husband and father, for 
the benefit of the boys and girls of Coweta County, Georgia. It now 
amounts to $13,935.70. 

James H. Hunt Loan Fund. A bequest by the late Mrs. James 
H. Hunt, of Gainesville, Georgia, for establishing the James H. Hunt 
Loan Fund. The assets of this fund are now in lands, the value of 
which is estimated at $87,000.00. Open to men and women. (It will 
probably be several years before loans can be made from this fund.) 

The James C. Harris Loan Fund, now amounting to $387.00. 

The Thomas E. Mitchell Educational Loan Fund. A bequest by 
the late Dr. Thomas E. Mitchell, of Columbus, Georgia, the income to 
be divided equally among The University of Georgia, the Georgia 
School of Technology, the Georgia State Teachers College (now the 
Co-ordinate College), and the Georgia State College for Women. Open 
to men and women. Present value of fund is $177,627.96. 

The notes given for loans from the Mitchell Fund are set up under 
four loan funds and all repayments are credited to those funds and 
not to the parent fund. These repayments, both principal and interest, 
are invested and become part of the corpus of these funds. The 
interest from these funds is lent to students. These four funds are 
as follows: 



GENERAL INFORMATION 63 



The University of Georgia Thomas E. Mitchell Fund— now amount- 
ing to $22,037.85. 

The Georgia School of Technology Mitchell Fund — now amounting 
to $21,323.48. 

The Georgia State College for Women Mitchell Fund — now amount- 
ing to $22,593.79. 

The Co-ordinate College Mitchell Fund— now amounting to $21,434.97. 

Martin Reynolds Smith Fund. A gift by Mr. J. Warren Smith 
to establish a fund in memory of his son, Martin Reynolds Smith. 
Value of the fund is $2,00.00. The interest from the investment is to 
be used as prizes for excellence in research work in chemistry. 

Edgar Gilmer Dawson Fund. A bequest by the late Dr. William 
Terrell Dawson, of Daytona, Florida, the income from which is used 
by the College of Agriculture for loans to its students. The value 
of the fund at present is $211,871.77. The College of Agriculture 
arranges with counties or schools to add $75.00 from this income to 
their contribution of $125.00, making a $200.00 fund to be lent to stu- 
dents from the counties or schools taking advantages of this arrange- 
ment. The county or school that establishes such a loan will have 
the privilege of nominating candidates through the county agent or 
vocational teacher as beneficiaries of this fund. In cases where this 
is not done the Regents reserve the right to nominate beneficiaries. 

The Georgia Bankers' Association has established a student loan 
fund. For some time this fund was administered by the Agricul- 
tural Committee of the Bankers' Association. This fund is now ad- 
ministered by the Regents of the University System. Application, 
therefore, should be made to Dean Chapman not later than May 1, 
and the application should be endorsed by a local banker. The Geor- 
gia Bankers' Association has requested that certain rules and regula- 
tions be observed in making these loans. These will be furnished 
the applicant. This fund now amounts to $8,592.41. 

The Georgia Bankers' Association also contributed the sum of 
$4,000.00 to provide loans to members of the Boys' and Girls' Clubs of 
the College of Agriculture, under certain rules as to appointment. 
Repayment of loans makes available the money for other loans. These 
funds now amount to $4,693.23. 

The Girts Canning Club Loan Fund. A revolving fund that is 
lent, as repayments are made, to girls in the School of Home Eco- 
nomics. This fund now amounts to $3,483.65. 

The Forestry Loan Fund. Open to students in the School of For- 
restry, now amounts to $736.95. 



64 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

The Alpha Zeta Fraternity Fund. Open to members of that fra- 
ternity, now amounting to $331.98. 

The Ida A. Young Loan Fund. Open to students of the Co-ordinate 
College, now amounts to $4,935.13. 

Student Aid Loan Fund, a loan fund for a number of junior and 
senior girls, of high character and with good scholastic records. 
Fund was established and is administered by the Georgia Federation 
of Women's Clubs. 

Mark Sullivan Loan Fund is now $100.00. 

Louis Wellhouse Memorial Fund is now $291.54. 

Pickett & Hatcher Fund, a fund open to junior and senior stu- 
dents (men and women) who are not studying strictly professional 
courses, such as law, medicine or the ministry, except the teaching 
profession. Students must be of good character and have good scholas- 
tic records. Administered by a Board of Trustees. Applications 
should be sent to Mr. Guy E. Snavely, Jr., Executive Secretary, Colum- 
bus, Georgia, before August 1 each year or at least six weeks before 
the opening quarter for which the student wishes the loan. 

Knights Templar Educational Fund, a loan fund open to junior 
and senior boys and girls. Established and administered by Knights 
Templar of Georgia. Requirements similar to Student Aid. 

Rotary Educational Foundation of Atlanta, a loan fund open to 
juniors and seniors. Administered by a loan board of trustees of 
the Atlanta Rotary Club. 

Georgia Masonic Loan Fund, loan open to juniors and seniors. 
Established and administered by Masons of Georgia. 

Other loan funds are Rotary Fund of Rome, Kiwanis Loan Fund 
of Rome, Rotary Loan Fund of Griffin, Rotary Loan Funds of Macon, 
Savannah, Athens, Brunswick, and Gainesville. 

William Wilson Findley Foundation. The Southern Railway 
Company has given the sum of $1,000.00 to be known as the Southern 
Railway Loan Fund, William Wilson Findley Foundation, in the Col- 
lege of Agriculture. The only restriction placed upon this fund is 
that students benefiting by it live in counties traversed by the South- 
ern Railway and its branches. The value of this fund is now $2,484.39. 

The Citizens and Southern National Bank gave $150.00 per month 
over a period of years, which constitutes a loan fund in the College 
of Agriculture for worthy students. This fund now amounts to 
$13,273.65. 

Atlanta Journal. Scholarships to the value of $150.00 each have 
been given to 43 boys and to the value of $200.00 each to 22 girls by 
various individuals through the efforts of the Atlanta Journal. These 



GENERAL INFORMATION 65 

scholarships are for students in the College of Agriculture, and as 
the loans are repaid the money is made available for other loans. 

Short Course Scholarships. Twelve hundred short course scholar- 
ships for boys and 600 for girls to the value of $15.00 each have 
been awarded through the agency of individuals, bankers, railroads, 
women's clubs, county boards of education, fair associations, and 
various other organizations. These funds are used for the payment 
of expenses of boys and girls attending the annual summer camp 
at the College of Agriculture. 

The Albon Williams Reed Memorial Fund of $2,000.00, given by 
Mr. and Mrs. T. W. Reed in memory of their son. The income from 
this fund each year will be used to assist some worthy boy through 
the College of Agriculture. This fund now amounts to $3,221.23. 

The Georgia Power Company. This organization has established 
10 annual loan funds of $150.00 each for a period of five years for the 
benefit of freshmen in the College of Agriculture. This fund now 
amounts to $9,065.09. 

Alumni Association (College of Agriculture) — Revolving loan fund 
of $1,002.60. 

Charlton County 4-H Club Fund — now $150.00. 

4-H Club Fund — now $1,080.52. 

Freshman Y. Commission Loan Fund — now $93.20. 

Phi Delta Phi Fund — now $50.00. 

Epsllon Sigma Pi Fund — now $50.00. 

Henry L. Richmond Fellowship: A fellowship established by Mrs. 
Henry L. Richmond, of Savannah, Georgia, who gave $25,000.00, from 
which $1,000.00 was used to provide books for chemical library and 
the interest on the remainder to provide for the fellowship. 

Junior Scholarship — To the student showing the greatest pro- 
ficiency in all agricultural subjects for the college year 1940-1941, 
a credit of $40.00 on his fees when he registers again in the Uni- 
versity. 

Sophomore Scholarship — To the student showing the greatest pro- 
ficiency in all agricultural subjects for the college year 1940-1941, 
a credit of $30.00 on his fees when he registers again in the Uni- 
versity. 

Freshman Scholarship — To the student showing the greatest pro- 
ficiency in all agricultural subjects for the college year 1940-1941, 
a credit of $20.00 on his fees when he registers again in the Uni- 
versity. 



66 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

PHELPS-STOKES SCHOLARSHIP 

This fellowship has been endowed under the following resolutions 
of the Trustees of the Phelps-Stokes Fund: 

"Whereas, Miss Caroline Phelps^Stokes in establishing the Phelps- 
Stokes Fund was especially solicitous to assist in improving the con- 
dition of the Negro, and 

"Whereas, It is the conviction of the Trustees that one of the best 
methods of forwarding this purpose is to provide means to enable 
Southern youth of broad sympathies to make a scientific study of 
the Negro and his adjustment to American civilization: 

"Resolved, That twelve thousand five hundred dollars ($12,500.00) 
be given to The University of Georgia for the permanent endowment 
of a research fellowship, on the following conditions: 

"1. The University shall appoint annually* a Fellow in Sociology, 
for the study of the Negro. He shall pursue advanced studies under 
the direction of the Departments of Sociology, Economics, Education, 
or History, as may be determined in each case by the President. 
The Fellowship shall yield $500.00, and shall, after four years, be 
restricted to graduate students. 

"2. Each Fellow shall prepare a paper or thesis embodying the 
result of his investigation, which shall be published by the Univer- 
sity with assistance from the income of the fund, any surplus re- 
maining being applicable to other objects incident to the main pur- 
pose of the Fellowship. A copy of these resolutions shall be in- 
corporated in every publication issued under this foundation. 

"The right to make all necessary regulations, not inconsistent 
with the spirit and letter of these resolutions, shall be given to the 
President and Faculty, but no changes in the conditions of the foun- 
dation can be made without the mutual consent of both the Board 
of Trustees of the University and of the Phelps-Stokes Fund." 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND ORGANIZATIONS 

ACTIVITIES 
ARTISTIC, DRAMATIC AND MUSICAL 

The art department sponsors annual student exhibitions, and 
throughout the year offers much valuable work of an extra-cur- 
ricular nature. 

The University Theater presents three plays each year. This stu- 



* By mutual consent of the Trustees of the Phelps-Stokes Fund and the Re- 
gents of the University, the Fellow in Sociology may be appointed biennially, 
two fellows every three years, or annually, as the President and the Faculty 
may see fit. The Fellowship will then pay $750.00 or $500.00. depending upon 
the frequency with which it is awarded. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 67 

dent group, under a director, conducts every phase of the Theater 
activity — business, acting and production. 

Musical activities include a Men's and Women's Glee Club, and 
a Little Symphony Orchestra, under the supervision of the depart- 
ment of music. The Men's Glee Club makes an annual tour. There 
is also the University Band and one or more dance orchestras. 

Music Appreciation Hour, conducted every Thursday night by 
Hugh Hodgson, head of the Music Department, is designed to teach 
students how to listen to music and enjoy it, and to acquaint stu- 
dents with the great composers. 

ATHLETIC 

The University maintains a full program of intercollegiate ath- 
letics for men. Included in this group are football, baseball, bas- 
ketball, track, cross country, tennis, golf, swimming, rifle marks- 
manship and other minor sports. 

Men's intramural athletics include touch football, basketball, 
track, cross country, tennis, softball, golf, rifle marksmanship, 
boxing, bowling, soccer, pool, swimming, volleyball, ping-pong, and 
others. 

A program of women's intramural sports is sponsored by the 
department of physical education for women, and the Women's 
Athletic Association. Sports participated in are volleyball, swim- 
ming, horse shoes, golf, basketball, bowling, table tennis, rifle 
marksmanship, fencing, badminton, softball, tennis, archery and 
others. 

FORENSIC 

Four Literary Societies give students opportunities to participate 
in debates and public speaking. They are Demosthenian and Phi 
Kappa (for men), Pioneer Club (for women) and Agricultural Club 
(for students in College of Agriculture). 

Numerous inter-society debates are scheduled throughout the 
year, and freshman and varsity teams make annual trips, and debate 
visiting teams. 

PUBLICATIONS 

Student publications include The Red and Black (campus weekly), 
Pandora (yearbook), Georgia Agriculturist (monthly magazine), 
Georgia Arch (monthly magazine), Cypress Knee (Forestry Club 



68 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

yearbook), Georgia Cloverleaf (4-H Club yearbook), Georgia Ag 
Engineer (yearbook), and Time Sheet (NY A publication). 

RELIGIOUS 

Three major units of student religious activity — the Y. M. C. A., 
the Y. W. C. A., and the Co-ordinate College Y. W. C. A. — func- 
tion under the University Voluntary Religious Association. The 
University recognizes the religious influences essential to the well- 
rounded development of the individual. The Association co-oper- 
ates with student pastors and workers maintained by the Athens 
churches, and throughout the year sponsors special programs for 
and by the students. 

SOCIAL 

Men's Greek Letter Fraternities include Sigma Alpha Epsilon, 
Chi Phi, Kappa Alpha, Phi Delta Theta, Sigma Chi, Alpha Tau 
Omega, Sigma Nu, Delta Tau Delta, Chi Psi, Kappa Sigma, Pi 
Kappa Alpha, Pi Kappa Phi, Lambda Chi Alpha, Phi Epsilon Pi, 
Tau Epsilon Phi, Alpha Epsilon Pi, Alpha Lambda Tau, and Alpha 
Gamma Rho. 

Women's Greek Letter Organizations are Phi Mu, Chi Omega, 
Alpha Gamma Delta, Kappa Delta, Alpha Delta Pi, Delta Delta 
Delta, Delta Phi Epsilon, Alpha Omicron Pi, Kappa Alpha Theta, 
Alpha Chi Omega, and Pi Beta Phi. 

Social functions are given regularly by many clubs and dormitory 
groups in addition to social fraternities. 

ORGANIZATIONS 

Numerous specialized groups, clubs and other similar organiza- 
tions are found on the Georgia campus. Following is a complete 
list, alphabetically arranged, and briefly identified with the depart- 
ment or activity to which they are related. Many are national, and 
professional groups. Distinction as to men's and women's groups, 
or both, is not made. 

A. S. A. E. (agricultural engineering), Ag Club (agriculture), 
Aghon (agriculture), Alpha Kappa Psi (commerce), Alpha Lambda 
Delta (scholarship), Alpha Phi Omega (service), Alpha Xi Sigma 
(forestry), Alpha Zeta (agriculture), Beta Gamma Sigma (scholar- 
ship), Biftad (honorary), Blue Key (honorary). 

Dance Club, Delta Sigma Pi (commerce), Dolphin Club (swim- 
ming), Economics Society (commerce), Forestry Club, Gaffau Club 
(agriculture), Gamma Sigma Epsilon (chemistry), German Club, 



GENERAL INFORMATION 69 

Gridiron (honorary), Hammer and Coffin (humor), Homecon and 
Junior Homecon (home economics), Hunt Club (horseback riding), 
International Relations Club, Jockey Club (horsemanship), Junior 
Cabinet (honorary), Kappa Delta Pi (education). 

Landscape Architecture Society, Mask and Foil (fencing), Mortar 
Board (honorary), Omicron Delta Kappa (honorary), Pharmacy 
Club, Phi Beta Kappa (scholarship), Phi Delta Chi (pharmacy), Phi 
Delta Phi (law), Phi Eta Sigma (scholarship), Phi Kappa Phi 
(scholarship), Phi Upsilon Omicron (home economics), Photography 
Club, Pi Mu Epsilon (mathematics), Poultry Science Club, Phi Chi 
(psychology). 

Saddle and Sirloin Club (animal husbandry), Scabbard and 
Blade (military), Sigma Alpha Iota (music), Sigma Delta Chi (Jour- 
nalism), Sigma Delta Kappa (law), Sketch Club (art), Sphinx 
(honorary), Thalian-Blackfriars ( dramatics), Theta Sigma Phi (jour- 
nalism), "X" Club (service), Xi Phi Xi (science), "Z" Club (hon- 
orary), Zodiac (scholarship). 

HONORS AND APPOINTMENTS 

Sophomore Declaimers. In April of each year ten members of the 
sophomore class are selected to compete for a declamation prize. 
The contest is held in May. 

Junior Speakers. Six members of the junior class are selected 
on the basis of original speeches to represent the class in exercises 
held at the Chapel in May. 

Vaeedictoriax. At the regular Faculty meeting, on Monday before 
the first Wednesday in May, the Faculty nominates not more than five 
members of the senior class who stand first in scholarship. The 
names are submitted in alphabetical order to the senior class, which 
selects from them a valedictorian, with the understanding that he 
or she shall maintain his or her standing in scholarship, though not 
necessarily that of first honor. 

No student is allowed to appear at Commencement either as speaker 
or declaimer who is not a member in good and full standing of one 
of the literary societies, and whose work is not acceptable to the 
head of the Department of English. 

The Debaters' Medals. Six gold medals are offered by the Board 
of Regents, to be awarded as prizes to members of the freshman and 
sophomore classes for excellence in debating. A medal is awarded to 
each of the debaters representing the literary society which wins a 
debate. 

The Ready Writers' Medal. To encourage the art of composition 



70 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

the Board of Regents awards a gold medal for the best essay written 
by any student of the University upon a theme announced after the 
competitors enter the room. 

The Feeshman Prize. The "Hamilton McWhorter Prize," as of the 
Class of 1875, for general excellence in the freshman class, is awarded 
to the member of that class who stands first in scholarship. 

The Bryan Prize. The late Hon. W. J. Bryan gave the sum of 
$250.00, the income of which is given annually as a prize to the writer 
of the best essay on our form of government. 

The Philosophy Prizes. Two prizes of $50.00 each were founded 
in 1902 by Judge Horace Russell, of New York. These prizes, named 
by the Board of Regents the "Horace Russell Prize in Psychology," 
and the "Walter B. Hill Prize in Ethics," are awarded to the writers 
of the best essays on subjects assigned by the Professors of Philosophy 
and Psychology. 

The Military Prize. A prize is annually awarded to the best drilled 
member of the R. O. T. C. in a competition held during Commence- 
ment. 

The Junior Orator's Prize. Offered by the Board of Regents for 
the best oration by a member of the junior class. 

The Edward A. Burdette Memorial Medal. Offered by Mrs. L. G. 
Daingerfield in memory of her son, Edward A. Burdette. This medal 
is awarded for excellence in English. 

Mu Beta Chapter op Chi Omega Sorority offers a prize of $25.00 
to the woman student of The University of Georgia who has the 
highest scholastic average. A student must take at least three courses 
per quarter constituting a normal year's work in order to be eligible 
for this prize. 

The Elijah Clarke D. A. R. Prize in History. The Elijah Clarke 
Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution offers a prize 
of $10.00 to the, student (man or woman) in the Department of His- 
tory writing the best paper on a subject relating to the American 
Revolution. 

Alpha Kappa Psi Award. To the junior (male) in the School of 
Commerce who has the highest scholastic average at the end of his 
junior year the Alpha Kappa Psi Fraternity awards each year a 
gold medallion. This prize is offered by the Alpha Epsilon Chapter 
of the Fraternity. 

Sigma Delta Chi Scholarship award is given by this national pro- 
fessional journalistic fraternity to graduating journalism students who 
stand in the highest 10 per cent of their own graduating class. 

Art Awards. Three Purchase Prizes of $15.00, $10.00, and $5.00 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



respectively with a bronze medal to go with the first prize and hon- 
orary mention certificates with the other two awards are offered by 
Edward S. Shorter, of Columbus, Georgia. These prizes will be given 
to students of the Art Department for work of outstanding merit; 
the awards to be made upon the recommendation of a jury to be 
selected by the Faculty of the department. Work receiving these 
awards will remain the property of the department. 

(The Art Department reserves the right to retain examples of the 
students' work from time to time). 

HONORS DAY 

An annual University Honors Day is held in October in accordance 
with the following plan: 

1. There will be an address by some distinguished speaker. 

2. Announcement is made of the winners of cups, prizes, trophies, 
and medals awarded for scholarship within the period between Honors 
Days. 

3. Announcement is made of those students who have been elected 
to honorary societies where the basis of election meets with a stan- 
dard of scholarship approved by the Faculty. 

4. Announcement is made of the organized groups whose average 
is the average of all of the undergraduates, plus 25 per cent of the 
difference between the average and 100 per cent. 

5. Announcement is made of students who have distinguished 
themselves in scholarship during the three preceding quarters. There 
are two grades of such students: 

(a) Students in the upper 10 per cent of the class are entitled 
to have their names printed on the Honors Day program and wear a 
distinguished badge. 

(b) Students in the upper 5 per cent of the class are entitled to 
have their names printed on the Honors Day program and to wear 
a distinguishing badge. This group constitutes the official Dean's 
List. 

6. The students and the organizations to be given honors are to 
be selected from records on file in the office of the Registrar. 



REGULATIONS GOVERNING STUDENTS 

ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS 

By action of the Regents, the legislative authority to establish 
rules and regulations for the immediate government of the Univer- 
sity in all that relates to the order and discipline of the institution 
is delegated to the President and Faculty. These rules and regula- 
tions are administered directly by the Administrative Dean and the 
Dean of the Co-ordinate College, subject to the approval of the 
President. 

The University prints annually a handbook entitled Regulations and 
Information for Guidance of Undergraduate Students. A copy of this 
book is given to every student upon registration. Upon request a 
copy will be mailed to any prospective student or patron of the Uni- 
versity. This handbook outlines in some detail the rules and regu- 
lations governing students. 

WITHDRAWALS FROM UNIVERSITY 

By action of the Regents no student shall be permitted to with- 
draw from the Univerity without the written consent of his parent 
or guardian. No student against whom charges are pending shall 
be permitted to withdraw until such charges are determined. 

CHAPEL EXERCISES 

A compulsory general assembly of all freshmen men and another 
assembly of all sophomore men students, both in charge of the Dean 
of Men, are held once each week in the Chapel. From time to time 
other exercises of an educational or religious nature, conducted by 
the President, a member of the Faculty or other speaker, are held 
for the benefit of the student body. 

Compulsory assemblies for freshman and sophomore women stu- 
dents and other exercises are held on the Co-ordinate College cam- 
pus in charge of the Dean of the Co-ordinate College. 

THE WOMAN'S STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION 

The administration of privileges and responsibilities of women stu- 
dents, other than the general matters covered in the Students' Hand- 
book, rests within the scope of the Woman's Student Government 
Association. This Association has two branches, one for Junior 
Division students and one for Senior Division students, for the ad- 



[72 ] 



GENERAL INFORMATION 73, 

ministration of student conduct. The Association regulates date 
privileges, dance privileges, absences from dormitories or sorority 
houses, smoking, etc. 

It is an active, functioning organization, through which are han- 
dled all cases of conduct involving women students alone, in con- 
junction with the Dean of Women and the Administrative Deans. 

The Woman's Student Government Association has proved a most 
valuable force on the campus, and has become an agent for con- 
stantly elevating the standards of the woman's student body at the 
University. 

The Handbook of the Woman's Student Government Association 
will be sent upon request. 

SCHOLASTIC REGULATIONS 

COURSE ORGANIZATION AND SYSTEM OF CREDITS 

The term course is used to designate a unit of instruction com- 
plete in itself for credit. The unit of credit is the "quarter-hour" 
(hereafter abbreviated to "hour"). One "quarter-hour" or "hour" 
of credit is allowed a course for each time per week it meets for one 
quarter. In general the duration of a meeting devoted to lecture or 
recitation work is one hour. In the science and technical courses 
requiring laboratory work the duration of each meeting is in gen- 
eral two hours, although in some cases three hours are required. 
For instance, a course meeting three times per week for one quarter 
is given three hours credit; a course meeting three times a week for 
two quarters is given six hours credit. In some cases, however, as, 
for instance, in Military Science and Physical Education, the hours 
of credit assigned a course do not follow this scheme. 

NUMBERING SYSTEM FOR COURSES 

In general a course complete in one quarter is assigned a separate 
number irrespective of the hours of credit carried. A course con- 
tinued over more than one quarter, all of which has to be completed 
before final credit is granted for any part, is indicated by a number 
with a letter subscript for each quarter over which it continues. 
For instance, Economics 55 a-b-c, credit 9 hours, indicates a course 
continuing over three quarters meeting three times per week for 
each of these three quarters; Astronomy 381 — three hours, credit 
three hours, indicates a complete credit unit in Astronomy. 

Junior Division courses are numbered from 1 to 199; Senior 
Division courses from 200 to 399 if open only for undergraduate 
credit; mixed Senior Division and graduate courses from 400 to 599 



74 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

if taken by an undergraduate; mixed Senior Division and graduate 
courses from 600 to 799* if taken by a graduate; purely graduate 
courses above 800. 

Junior Division courses in general are to be taken only by Junior 
Division students and Senior Division courses by Senior Division 
students, except as indicated below. 

A sophomore of full standing (i. e., credit for a minimum of 53 
hours and; with quality points to match his total credits) may be 
allowed hy the Dean of Administration, on presentation of the writ- 
ten consent of the instructor in charge of the contemplated Senior 
Division course, to elect courses bearing Senior Division numbers to 
a minimum of 15 hours provided such election does not defer re- 
quired Junior Division courses to the student's junior year. How- 
ever, no courses taken under a Senior Division number before a 
student has reached Senior Division standing (i. e. f credit for 106 
hours with the proper quality points) shall be used to decrease the 
total number of Senior Division credit hours mentioned below as 
required after a student reaches the Senior Division. Neither shall 
such courses be considered as part of a student's major concentra- 
tion for the Senior Division except as specifically stated later under 
the degree requirements of the various colleges or schools. 

Of the 90 hours required of all Senior Division students, at least 
60 must be courses bearing Senior Division numbers and taken 
after the student reaches Senior Division standing. Thirty of the 
90 hours may bear Junior Division numbers if so approved by the 
student's major professor. No Junior Division student will be al- 
lowed to register for a course numbered 400 or over. 

CLASSIFICATION BY CLASSES 

At the beginning of the Fall Quarter a student to be ranked as a 
sophomore must have credit for 37 hours; to be ranked as a junior 
he must have credit for 90 hours; and to be ranked as a senior he 
must have credit for 142 hours. 

Classifications are not changed during the college year in which 
the student registers, except as a classification for freshman and 
sophomore assembly. For that purpose a student by taking extra 
hours may be changed from one classification to another. 

NORMAL LOAD OF WORK 

In the Junior Division the normal load of work for each quarter 
is 16 hours (quarter-hours). In cases where schedule difficulties 
demand it, a student may be assigned as few as 14 or as many as 
18 hours. Not more than 51 hours in addition to the Military Sci- 



GENERAL INFORMATION 75 

ence or Physical Education may be assigned, however, for any one 
regular academic year of three quarters, except by permission of 
the Dean of Administration. 

In the Senior Division the normal load of work for each quarter 
is 15 hours. However, in some cases a student may schedule as few 
as 14 or as many as 16 hours. 

A student who cannot devote his entire time to his classes, be- 
cause of illness or outside work necessary to meet expenses, or for 
other good reasons, may be allowed by the Administrative Dean to 
take less than the normal load of work. In cases where a large 
portion of a student's time is devoted to outside work, a work load 
less than the normal will be required by the Dean. 

In some professional degrees the normal load of work for the 
Senior Division is in excecss of 45 hours, as outlined in the degree 
requirements. 

Senior Division students may be permitted to schedule courses in 
Advanced Military Science in addition to their normal load; this, 
however, does not, under any circumstances, allow a student's total 
load to be above 21 hours per quarter. 

The "normal load of work," mentioned above, and the "extra 
load of work," mentioned below, do not include the Military Science 
or Physical Education required in the Junior Division. These 
courses are to be taken as additional work. 

Every student, except by special permit of the Dean of Administra- 
tion, shall be required to follow a prescribed order of courses in his 
curriculum. In case of temporary irregularity, due to failure or 
other causes, the student shall be required to schedule such courses 
in his curriculum as will make him conform as quickly as possible. 

EXTRA LOAD OF WORK 

Students are advised not to undertake more credit hours of 
work per week than that outlined as a normal load. Although it 
may be possible for a student to pass an extra work load, it is 
usually at a sacrifice of educational values. No freshmen are al- 
lowed to undertake more than a normal load. In some cases (see 
below) extra hours may be allowed to students, other than fresh- 
men, to a maximum never to exceed 21 hours per quarter on ap- 
proval of the Dean of Administration if recommended by the Dean 
of the 1 student's school or college or registering officer authorized 
by him. Consideration will foe given to applications from students 
in the following cases. (Note Extra Course Fees, page 53): 

1. Students whose names appear on the Dean's List for the 



76 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

current year or students who have made an average of 87 on three 
quarters' work in residence during the preceding regular session. 
Students who have made an average grade of 90 on the preceding 
quarter's work. 

2. Seniors during their last quarter before graduation where six 
extra hours will enable them to graduate at; the end of this quarter. 
In some cases of schedule difficulties these six extra hours for 
seniors may be distributed over their last two quarters. 

3. Transfer students who have made a grade of at least 90 or 
A on their previous year's work at a standard institution. Trans- 
fer students who are repeating courses for which they were granted 
credit from the institution from which they transfer. 

SCHOLASTIC GRADES 

The University indicates grades on courses by the following scheme: 

A+ Exceptional (95-100) 

A Excellent (90-94) 

B+ Very Good (85-89) 

B Good (80-84) 

C+ Average (75-79) 

C Satisfactory (70-74) 

D+ Passing (65-69) 

D Barely Passing (60-64) 

Other marks are in use to indicate varying grades of work not 
passing. They are: 

E, (condition). A condition may be removed by examination or 
by other means stipulated by the instructor concerned. A condition 
(E) not removed within 12 months is considered a failure (F). 
When an E is removed the maximum grade allowed on the course 
is D. 

F, (failure). This grade may be converted into a higher grade 
only by repeating the work in the course. 

I, (incomplete). This mark indicates that the student has been 
unable to complete the work of the course. It shall be given only 
when the work already done has been of a quality acceptable to the 
instructor. Opportunity to complete the requirement in the course 
shall be given during the next quarter in residence, and in general 
if the incomplete mark is not removed by the end of this quarter 
it shall be considered a condition. 

W, Withdrawn from the course by permission with no grade as- 
signed. 

WF, Indicates a course from which the student withdrew by per- 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



mission while doing unsatisfactory work. This grade carries the F 
value. 

N, Indicates that the student withdrew from the course without 
permission or was excluded by the Dean for excessive absences. 
This grade carries an F value. 

QUALITY POINTS 

The value of each grade in quality points is as follows: A grade 
of A-f- or A entitles the student to three quality points for each 
credit hour; a grade of B + or B, two quality points; a grade of 
C-f- or C, one quality point; a grade of D— or 1 D, no quality points. 
A condition may be removed by re-examination, but no quality points 
may be obtained by re-examination. 

A grade of D+ or D, while accepted as a passing mark, does not 
represent satisfactory achievement. Like the higher grades, it is 
final and cannot be raised by subsequent work or examination, al- 
though the entire course, or in the case of a continuation course, 
one quarter in which the grade has been made, may be repeated 
upon recommendation of the professor in charge. Since no quality 
points are attached to the grade of D-f- or D, such grade must be 
validated by higher marks in other subjects. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

Courses carrying a minimum credit of 196 quarter-hours, includ- 
ing the 10 quarter-hours in Military Science (men) or Physical 
Education (women) are required for graduation. Military Science 
(10 hours) is a requirement for all physically fit male students who 
enter the University in the freshman or sophomore class. Any 
waiving of this requirement must have the approval of the Com- 
mandant of Cadets. 

A total of 1 8 6 ; quality points, 60 of which must be obtained after 
reaching Senior Division standing in Senior Division courses, must 
be obtained to qualify the student for graduation. (See above). 
No quality points may be obtained in the required courses in Mil- 
itary Science or Physical Education. The grade of D or D+ is not 
counted towards a major and in at least three-fourths of the total 
number of credit hours the grades must be C or higher. 

In some professional degrees the total requirements for a degree 
are more than 19 6 hours as listed in the degree requirments. 

Students graduating in June, 19 42, and thereafter will be re- 
quired to pass courses of credit value of at least 90 hours after they 
reach Senior Division standing. In some cases this will increase the 
total requirement for graduation beyond the minimum of 196 hours. 



78 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

The English Department has established an extra course in cor- 
rective English and any student in the senior college whose written 
work in connection with any of his studies is below a reasonable 
standard of correctness may, on recommendation of his instructor, 
be required to take this course until in the judgment of the English 
Department his writing has become satisfactory. This course will 
run one hour a week throughout the year. 

Comparison with bulletins issued prior to April, 1938, will show 
that the University has changed its unit of credit from "courses" 
to "quarter-hours." The former "course" unit is equivalent to five 
"quarter-hours" units. This has caused some adjustments in the 
degree requirements. The class of 1940 will graduate under the old 
requirements. The class of 19 41 will graduate under requirements 
in the 1938 bulletin with equitable adjustments. 

EXAMINATION ON CONSTITUTION 

Examinations on the Constitution of the United States and the 
State, of Georgia, required of all persons receiving a degree from 
the University unless exempted by course credit in history or polit- 
ical science, are given annually on the first Friday after Washing- 
ton's birthday and the first Friday after the Fourth of July. A 
series of lectures to aid students in preparing for these examina- 
tions is offered during the two weeks preceding the examinations. 
Special examinations for students having* failed on or been absent 
from the regular examinations are offered on the first Friday in 
May and the first Friday in November, but unless the student can 
satisfy the Dean's office that he had a valid reason for not having 
passed the regular examination, the regular fee for special exam- 
inations will be charged for these special examinations on the Con- 
stitutions. 

REPORTS 

Reports for every college student will be sent by the Registrar 
to parent or guardian at the end of each quarter. 

At the middle of the first quarter and of the second quarter the 
Registrar will send the parent or guardian a report of each fresh- 
man in addition to the regular report at the end of each quarter. 

DEAN'S LIST 

The Dean's List is announced once a year in the Fall Quarter 
on Honors Day and is determined by a student's record on the three 
quarters of the preceding regular session. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



For freshmen and sophomores the Dean's List is the upper 5 
per cent (on the basis of grades) of the total number of freshmen 
and sophomores computed irrespective of the school or college 
in which the student is registered. For juniors and seniors the 
Dean's List is computed separately for each school or college group 
and consists of the upper 5 per cent of each group. 

Any student's name will also be placed on the Dean's List who 
makes an average grade of A on the previous year's work. 

The Dean's List announced at any Honors Day shall hold good 
for the current college year. 

The Dean of Administration may at any time remove a student's 
name from the list if the calibre of his work falls markedly below 
the Dean's List standard or if his absence privileges are abused. 
No student's name will be allowed to remain on the current list 
who receives a failing grade in any course. A student while on the 
current Dean's List may be allowed the privilege of scheduling extra 
work to a maximum of 21 hours. (See Extra Load of Work Rule). 
A student on the current Dean's List is not subject to all the regu- 
lations limiting absences from classes, but he must attend all lab- 
oratory work, take all examinations, and perform all written work 
under the same conditions as all other students. His! total absences, 
however, cannot exceed 50 per cent of total classes offered. 

ATTENDANCE 

While in residence each student is required to attend regularly all 
lectures and other prescribed exercises in the courses which he pur- 
sues, or else suffer such penalties as may be imposed for unexcused 
absences. 

A student has no right to be absent from any exercise in a course 
for which he is registered except when he is ill or has been officially 
excused by the Dean in accordance with rules and regulations of the 
University. 

An excuse for absence does not in any way relieve the student 
from responsbility for the work of the class. If in any quarter a 
student becomes subject to probation both for attendance and for 
low scholastic standing he may be dropped from the University. 

Any student in the University who absents himself from any class 
or exercise on the day preceding or the day following any holiday 
or the first day of the Winter or Spring Quarter and who does not 
have a valid excuse for such absence shall pay a fine; of $3.00. 



80 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

EXCLUSION FOR POOR SCHOLARSHIP 

The minimum scholarship standards for remaining a student 
in the University are given in detail in the student hand-book of 
rules and regulations. Under these regulations a number of stu- 
dents are excluded from the University each year. 

The University does not feel that it can be a patron of in- 
efficiency, or waste its limited resources by retaining students who 
cannot or will not profit by the instruction offered. 

INDEPENDENT STUDY 

Distinctly superior students may be exempted from some of the 
usual regulations governing class attendance and examinations, and 
from some of the specified degree requirements, and allowed to pur- 
sue independent study. 

To be considered candidate for a degree under this independent 
stuy plan, a student must meet the following conditions: 

(1) His scholastic record during the two quarters preceding his 
application must have been such as to place him on the Dean's List. 

(2) He must present to the Executive Committee, for approval, 
a complete proposed program of work leading to the degree. This 
program must include a list of courses he proposes to complpete in 
class, those he proposes to complete by private study, and work other 
than course work he proposes to do. The time taken to complete 
this program must not be less than the time that would be required 
to complete his requirements under the normal procedure. 

(3) The proposed program would be prepared with the advice of 
the professor in whose subject the student proposes to do his major 
work and must have the written approval of this major professor 
and the head of the department in which his major lies. It must, 
in addition, have the written approval of the Dean of Administration 
and the dean or director of the college or school in which the de- 
gree falls. These assume the major responsibility for the student's 
scholastic preparation for the program and the educational adequacy 
of the program. In case any specified degree requirements are to be 
waived the program must have the written approval of the chairman 
of the division in which the waived subject is listed. 

(4) The work of the student' will be supervised by his major pro- 
fessor. In case the student's work is unsatisfactory at any time, 
the independent study privilege will be removed and work resumed 
under the regular plan, due credit being given for work completed. 

(5) At the end of the senior year comprehensive examinations 
covering the candidate's chosen field will be given to test his mas- 



GENERAL INFORMATION Sl_ 

tery of the field. Results of these examinations shall determine the 
credit to be awarded for independent study and in case of marked 
excellence the department may recommend the candidate for grad- 
uation with departmental honors. 

(6) The program, when approved by the Executive Committee, 
becomes the requirement for the degree and may not be changed 
except by the procedure outlined for its adoption. 

(7) For purposes of transcript records in the Registrar's office, 
the work completed will be evaluated as nearly as practicable in 
terms of course credits. 

CHANGES IN REGISTRATION 

A student desiring to drop a subject once taken, up, or to take up 
a new subject, after his study list has been filed, must do so only 
with permission from the Dean's office. For Junior Division students 
this in general involves obtaining the signature of the Administrative 
Dean or his representative on a drop card. In the case of Senior 
Division students the signature of the professor whose course is to 
be taken, the signature of the student's major professor and that of 
the Dean of his college or school are in general necessary for a change, 
in addition to the signature of the Administrative Dean. The fee 
for any change of schedule is $1.00. This is. a service fee and can be 
waived only by the Administrative Dean and only for exceptional 
reasons such as actual errors by an authorized scheduling officer, 
adding an extra course by reason of the attainment of the extra 
course privilege by high grades, assignment to NYA jobs and serious 
illness. Change due to failure in a course does not constitute a valid 
reason for fee exemption. Each student is responsible for seeing 
that each course scheduled is at an hour where the official schedule 
shows a section of the course. All changes in courses for a succeeding 
quarter must be made at least two weeks before the close of the 
current quarter at the place and time designated by the Administ- 
rative Dean. Changes in schedule of courses made after this time 
may incur a fee of $3.00. No changes thereafter can be made except 
those made necessary by failure grades, the mistake of an official of 
the University, the extra course privilege won by the student, and in 
exceptional cases such changes as may be authorized by the Dean 
of Administration. 

In case a course is dropped where a student is not clearly doing 
work of a passing grade, a failing mark WF is recorded. In gen- 
eral no courses are removed from a student's study list during the 
last five weeks of a quarter. 

Students are not permitted to enter new classes after 20 per cent 



82 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

of the total scheduled work of the quarter has elapsed. All work 
missed due to registering late for a class must be made up to the 
satisfaction of the instructor. Exceptions to the 20 per cent rule 
may be made in case it can be shown that the student has already 
covered the subject matter covered in the class to the date of en- 
trance. 

By re-registering in a subject for which he has received credit 
either by class work at the University or by advanced standing for 
work done elsewhere, a student forfeits the credit, and the final grade 
given in the course is the one made in the repetition. 

A student dropping a course without the permission of the Dean 
has violated the regulations of the University and is subject to dis- 
ciplinary action. 

SCHEDULE OF COURSES 

A schedule of courses for the academic year 1940-1941, giving de- 
tails as to the quarters in which the courses will be given and the 
hour of day at which the various classes meet, will be mailed to 
applicants upon request to The Department of Public Relations. 

CHECKING FOR GRADUATION 

Any senior expecting to complete requirements for graduation dur- 
ing any quarter is required to check his program for graduation with 
the Registrar before the close of the preceding quarter. No claims 
for adjustment of grades or errors in record of previous quarters will 
be considered thereafter. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

GENERAL 

The object of the College of Arts and Sciences is to offer to its 
students a liberal education. Technical and vocational schools turn 
out experts and specialists. Professional schools may train doctors, 
lawyers and teachers. Liberal Arts Colleges undertake to develop 
men and women. 

The College of Arts and Sciences aims primarily at the training 
and development of the individual. It seeks to give him an apprecia- 
ton of the social, economic and cultural forces which have shaped 
the world in which he lives. It undertakes to subject a student to 
those disciplinary processes which aid him in his quest for wisdom, 
sagacity, judgment and a philosophical state of mind. It strives to 
develop within the individual a resourcefulness which will enable 
him to adapt himself to all conditions and to grapple intelligently 
with the unknown problems which an unknowable future is certain 
to bring. 

In stressing the cultivation of the individual, the Liberal Arts 
College does not lose sight of the welfare of society as a whole. It 
is merely recognizing the incontrovertible fact that society is made 
up of individuals and no society is better than the individuals who 
compose it. Social harmony and social progress are achieved by 
the enlightened efforts of wise and unselfish individuals. 

Although the training of the Liberal Arts College is not vocational 
otf professional in its nature, such training is the best possible prep- 
aration for later professional or scientific study. The Liberal Arts 
student acquires attitudes of mind and powers of analysis and dis- 
crimination which aid him greatly in mastering advance profes- 
sional courses. Indeed, such training is so helpful that many pro- 
fessional schools will accept as students only those perons who have 
already devoted a certain period to study of the liberal arts. Both 
the Law School of the University in Athens and the Medical School 
in Augusta stress the advantage of a good general education, such 
as that offered by a liberal arts curriculum, before starting upon 
professional work. The Law School requires two years and rec- 
ommends three years before admission, and the Medical School re- 
quires three years and recommends four years of preliminary col- 
lege training. 

The College of Arts and Sciences (Franklin College) consists of 
five divisions, as follows: 



[83] 



84 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Division of Language and Litebature, which includes the depart- 
ments of English, Greek, German, Latin, and Romance Languages. 

Division of Social Sciences, which includes the departments of 
Economics, Geography, History and Political Science, Philosophy, and 
Sociology. 

Division of Physical Sciences, which includes the departments of 
Chemistry, Mathematics, Geology, and Physics and Astronomy. 

DrvisiON of Biological Sciences, which includes the departments 
of Botany, Psychology, and Zoology. 

Division of Fine Arts, which includes the departments of Art, 
Music, Landscape Architecture, and Dramatic Art. 

The College has a Dean as the main administrative officer and 
each of the above Divisions has a Director who supervises the work 
of the departments in his Division. 

The degrees offered in the College are: Bachelor of Arts, for 
which the major division must be Languages and Literature, Social 
Sciences, Biological Sciences, or Physical Scienhes; Bachelor of 
Science, for which the major division must be Physical Sciences or 
Biological Sciences; Bachelor of Science in Chemistry, for which the 
major subject must be Chemistry; and Bachelor of Fine Arts, for 
which the major division must be Fine Arts. 

Closely affiliated with the College of Arts and Sciences, but not 
administered in it except for the work of the Junior Division, are 
the following schools: the Peabody College of Education, the School 
of Commerce, the Henry W. Grady School of Journalism, and the 
School of Home Economics. 

THE UNIFORM JUNIOR DIVISION PROGRAM 

The work of the Junior Division of the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences and its affiliated colleges and schools is designed to give the 
student a background of a broad general education. Therefore, 
about two-thirds of the program is common to all degrees and con- 
sists of courses in the main fields of knowledge. 

In the field of the natural sciences are included a general course 
in human biology, health and hygiene and a course of the survey 
type in the physical sciences of astronomy, chemistry, geology and 
physics. The required course in elementary mathematics stresses 
those principles likely to be useful to any educated citien. In the 
social sciences is included a course of the survey type treating the 
social, economic and political factors influencing our present and 
past civilizations and a course discussing these factors as they apply 
particularly to the State of Georgia. In the humanities are included 



GENERAL INFORMATION 85 

the usual elementary course in English composition and rhetoric 
and a course of the survey type in world literature and the fine 
arts; college courses in one or more foreign languages are also re- 
quired. Courses in Military Science for men or Physical Education 
for women are required of all students not physically disqualified 
throughout the freshman and sophomore years. In addition to the 
above program common to all degrees there are additional course 
requirements, dependent upon the degree towards which the student 
is working. In the degrees, Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Sci- 
ence, about half the sophomore program is open for electives along 
the lines of a student's interests. 

SENIOR DIVISION PROGRAMS 

On registering in the Senior Division a student must select the 
degree for which he is a candidate, the division in which he will 
take his major work and the subject in this major division in which 
he will take the major part of his work. The professor in charge 
of the student's major subject is known as the student's major pro- 
fessor and adviser, and all courses constituting the student's Senior 
Division program (both required and elective courses) must be ap- 
proved by this adviser. When approved by the Dean of the College 
of Arts and Sciences this program becomes a requirement for the 
degree unless modified later by the adviser and the Dean. All ap- 
provals to be official must be in writing and filed in the Registrar's 
records. 

The major concentration programs for the degrees of Bachelor 
of Pine Arts and Bachelor of Science in Chemistry are shown later 
under degree requirements. The major concentration programs for 
the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science must include 
the minimum requirements, applicable to all programs, such addi- 
tional requirements must be included as are designated by each 
division or department. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR CONCENTRATION WORK 
FOR BACHELOR OF ARTS AND BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

A minimum number of 40 hours credit in courses bearing Senior 
Division numbers (excluding all specific Junior Division subject 
or group requirements) must, in general, be taken from the stu- 
dent's major division after he reaches Senior Division standing. 
However, if courses with credit value of 10 or more hours (exclud- 
ing all specific Junior Division subject or group requirements) have 
been taken in the major division in Junior Division numbers or in 
Senior Division numbers before the student reaches Senior Division 



8j) THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

standing, the minimum of credit hours may be reduced by 5 for each 
10 hours so taken but not below a total of 25. In general the num- 
ber of credit hours in Senior Division numbers in the major subject 
must be at least 20 but this number may be reduced to 15 under 
conditions stated above for reduction of the division minimum. By 
special action of the Dean and Major Professor in some cases this 
number is reduced to 10. By special action by the Dean and Major 
Professor in some cases a combined divisional major may be offered, 
part from the Biological Science division and part from the Physical 
Science division, or one may be authorized part from the Social 
Science division and part from the Language-Literature division. 

MODIFICATIONS OF DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR TRANSFER 

STUDENTS 

The modifications apply to any student who transfers into the 
University from other institutions with junior standing and also 
for students transferring within the University from one degree to 
another with junior class standing, provided that in this case no 
modification shall be made exempting a student from a Junior Di- 
vision course required in the degree for which he was a candidate, 
if this course were omitted contrary to the regulations demanding 
that required courses be taken before elective courses are allowed. 

The total mathematics-science requirements for the A.B. degree 
may be met by 5 credit hours in mathematics and 20 credit hours in 
science courses, all of which carry individual laboratory work. 

The total social science requirements for the A.B. and the B.S. 
degrees may be met by Social Science 4, 5 hours, and 15 other credit 
hours in social science courses, provided transfer credit has been al- 
lowed for no more than 5 credit hours in social science courses. 

MODIFICATIONS FOR TRANSFER STUDENTS IN THE 
A.B. DEGREE 

The total requirement for the foreign language group for the A.B. 
degree is reduced from 40 hours (combined in high school and col- 
lege) to 30 hours for students who transfer as junior* with less than 
10 hours in foreign language (in high school or college) to their 
credit., 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

While this degree points to no specific vocation or profession, it 
aids the student in making a wise choice of his field' of special study 
and his life work. The major division may be Language and Lit- 
erature, Social Science, Physical Sciences or Biological Sciences. 



s 



GENERAL INFORMATION 87 

JUNIOR DIVISION REQUIREMENTS 

Freshman Sophomore 

Hours Hours 

ocial Science 1 a-b-c 9 Social Science 4 5 

♦Physical Science 1-2 *Human Biology 1-2 

or or 

* Human Biology 1-2 10 *Physical Science 1-2 10 

'English 2 a-b-c 9 Humanities 1 a-b-c __ 9 

. ^Mathematics 20 5 Arts and Science electives..l5 or 14 

tForeign Language 10 General electives 9 or 10 

Military Science (men) Military Science (men) 

or or 

Physical Education (women).... 5 Physical Education (women).... 5 

Elective 5 

53 53 

TOTAL REQUIREMENTS 

Hours 

(1) Social Science 1 a-b-c _ 9 

Social Science 4 5 

(2) *Physical Science 1-2 10 

Human Biology 1-2 10 

Mathematics 20 5 

(3) English 2 a-b-c 9 

Humanities 1 a-b-c __ 9 

(4) Military Science (men) 

or 
Physical Education (women) 10 

(5) Major Concentration (as previously outlined on page 85). 

(6) Foreign Language Requirements for the A.B. Degree. Courses 
of credit value of at least 40 hours (combined in high school and col- 



* Students who take the mathematics-science freshman placement 
examinations and make a sufficiently high score on any course to 
justify the assumption that they have essentially mastered this 
course will be exempt from the course as a degree requirement. In 
such case no credit hours are allowed for the course, but a general 
elective is substituted for it. If a student is exempted under this 
provision from courses carrying more than 10 credit hours the sub- 
stituted courses over 10 hours must be in mathematics-science. 

t Courses of credit value of at least 25 hours (combined in high 
school and college) from French, German, Greek, Latin, Spanish 
are required. Each high school unit reduces the total by 5. At 
least 10 hours in college courses must be taken and at least one 
language must be taken through course number 103. 

While Spanish 1 may be used to satisfy the modern language re- 
quirement, French or German is recommended for all students ex- 
cept those who have definite reasons for thinking they will need 
Spanish. French or German should be taken by all students con- 
templating graduate work in any field or those who are contem- 
plating professional work in science, including medicine. 



88 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

lege) from French, German, Greek, Italian, Latin, Spanish, with at 
least 20 hours in college. The total must include the following two 
groups : 

(1) French or German or Spanish — one language through course 
Number 103 with at least 10 hours in college. 

(2) (a) Latin or Greek — one language through course Number 103 
with at least 10 hours in college. 

or 

(b) Studies in Classical Culture to the extent of 9 hours, plus 
an additional 5 hour continuation course in modern lan- 
guage, provided this additional course is necessary to bring 
the student's hours up to the required minimum of 40. 

or 

(c) Greek 356-357, Greek Literature in Translation and Latin 
458, Latin Literature in Translation, 15 hours. 

or 

(d) Mathematics to the extent of 15 hours in college. 

If this option is chosen, the total language requirement in high 
school and college is reduced to a minimum of 30 hours. 

(7) Mathematics-Science Division. The total requirements include, 
in addition to the Junior Division requirements listed, science courses 
requiring laboratory of credit value of 10 hours or science courses 
requiring laboratory of credit value of 5 hours and 5 hours of mathe- 
matics. 

(8) Social Science Division. The total requirements include, in 
addition to the Junior Division requirements listed, courses from the 
social science division requiring at least 10 credit hours. 

(9) Electtves. A sufficient number to bring the total number of 
credit hours to not less than 196. 

In general, all courses in the University are open as electives. 
However, not more than 15 hours credit will be allowed for profes- 
sional courses in the professional schools. In Education, however, a 
maximum of 30 hours will be allowed for those students desiring to 
meet the requirements set by the State of Georgia for a teacher's 
license. These Education courses must be logically related and the 
student's choice of courses must be approved by the Dean of the 
College of Education. 

Note. In case a student elects to take a three course sequence in 
Greek, his total requirements for the degree are reduced to 191 hours. 

CURRICULUM IN ARTS AND LAW 
(A Six-Year Combined Curriculum) 

The curriculum outlined here is provided for students who wish 
to combine the Arts and Law courses and secure the degree of Bach- 
elor of Arts and the degree of Bachelor of Laws in less than the 
regularly prescribed time of seven years. To have the benefit of this 
combined course, students must meet all the requirements, prescribed 



GENERAL INFORMATION 89 

and elective, for tooth degrees. The student will be granted the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Arts at the end of the fourth year, or as soon 
as he has completed the work specified and the proper number of 
elective courses from the Law School curriculum. The degree of 
Bachelor of Laws will be conferred upon the completion of the work 
of the Law School. The following is the combined curriculum in 
Arts and Law: 

JUNIOR DIVISION REQUIREMENTS 

The completion of the Junior Division program of studies as pre- 
scribed for candidates for the Bachelor of Arts degree. 

SENIOR DIVISION REQUIREMENTS 

In the College of Arts and Sciences a sufficient number of Senior 
Division courses must be completed to satisfy all the specific require- 
ments for the degree of Bachelor of Arts with sufficient elective 
courses from arts and science courses to bring the total to a. mini- 
mum of 151 credit hours. However, in case the major concentration 
work is in the Social Science Division a minimum of Senior Division 
courses in the major division of credit value of 30 hours with 15 
hours in the major subject will meet the requirement. Three quar- 
ters of residence work devoted exclusively to arts and science courses 
will be required after admission to the Senior Division. None of 
these 45 required Senior Division hours can be taken other than in 
residence at Athens and none can be taken while a student is pur- 
suing his studies in the Law School. 

In the Law School a sufficient number of courses taken as elec- 
tives to bring the total credit for the degree to 196 hours. 

FOREIGN OR OTHER GOVERNMENT SERVICE 

For those who are preparing for foreign or other government 
service of the United States, the Bachelor of Arts degree with major 
concentration in the Social Science Division is recommended. Elec- 
tives should be carefully chosen after consultation with the Dean of 
the College and Director of the Social Science Division. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

The program of studies and objectives of the Bachelor of Science 
degree are very similar to those of the Bachelor of Arts degree, with 
less emphasis on the Foreign Languages and more on Mathematics 
and Natural Science. The major division must be Physical Science 
or Biological Science. 



90 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

JUNIOR DIVISION REQUIREMENTS 

The Junior Division requirements are the same as for the Bach- 
elor of Art degree with the exception that the foreign language in 
college must be French or German and two of the sophomore elec- 
tive courses should be in either the Physical Science or the Biolog- 
ical Science division. 

TOTAL REQUIREMENTS 

Hours 

(1) Social Science 1 a-b-c 9 

Social Science 4 : _. — 5 

(2) *Physical Science 1-2 . _10 

Human Biology 1-2 10 

Mathematics 20 5 

(3) English 2 a-b-c - ___ 9 

Humanities 1 a-b-c 9 

(4) Military Science (men) 

or 
Physical Education (women) .10 

(5) Major Concentration (as previously outlined on page 85). 

(6) Foreign Language — courses of credit value of at least 25 hours 
(combined in high school or college) from French or German, Greek, 
Latin, Spanish are required. Each high school unit reduces the total 
by 5. At least 10 hours in college courses must be taken and at least 
one language must be taken through course Number 103. 

While Spanish may be used to satisfy the modern language re- 
quirement, French or German is recommended for all students 
except those who have definite reasons for thinking they will need 
Spanish. French or German should be taken by all students con- 
templating graduate work in any field or those who are contemplat- 
ing professional work in science, including medicine. 

(7) Mathematics-Science Division. The total must include Mathe- 
matics 21 or equivalent Mathematics in addition to Mathematics 20 
and a double course of 10 hours from Zoology or Botany in addition 
to Human Biology 1-2 and a double course of 10 hours from Chem- 
istry, Geology or Physics in addition to Physical Science 1-2. 

(8) Social Science Division. The total requirements include, in 
addition to the Junior Division requirements listed, courses from the 
Social Science Division requiring at least 10 credit hours. 

(9) Electtves. A sufficient number to bring the total number of 
credit hours to not less than 196. In general all courses offered in 
the University are open as electives. However, not more than 15 
hours elective credit will be allowed for professional courses in the 
professional schools. In Education, however, a maximum of 30 
hours will be allowed for those students desiring to meet the re- 
quirements set by the State of Georgia for a high school teacher's 
license. These education courses must be logically related and the 
student's choice of courses must be approved by the Dean of the 
College of Education. 



* See footnote under Junior Division of A.B. degree. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 91 

CURRICULUM IN SCIENCE AND LAW 

(Six- Year Combined Curriculum) 

The requirements for this curriculum are the same as previously 
described for the combined degree in Arts and Law with the dif- 
ference that all the specified requirements for the Bachelor of Sci- 
ence degree must be completed. 

CURRICULUM IN SCIENCE AND MEDICINE 

(Seven-Year Combined Curriculum) 

This curriculum enables a student a complete the work required 
for the degree of Bachelor of Science and the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine in seven years. On the completion of the three years work 
outlined below and the work required in the first year of the Medical 
School at Augusta the student will receive the degree of Bachelor 
of Science. The degree of Doctor of Medicine will be conferred 
upon the completion of the work of the Medical School. 

PRE-MED PROGRAM 

Freshman Sophomore 

Hours Hours 

English 2 a-b-c 9 Zoology 25-26 10 

Social Science 1 a-b-c 9 Chemistry 340 a-b .10 

Mathematics 20 5 Physics 20 5 

Human Biology 1-2 10 Mathematics 21 or 356 .— 5 

Chemistry 21-22-23 15 Social Science 4 5 

Military Science (men) fFrench or German 10 

or Military Science (men) 

Physical Education 1 (women) 5 or 

Physical Education 2 (women) 5 

53 50 

Junior 

Hours 

Humanities 1 a-b-c 9 

Physics 25-26 10 

$To complete science major 15 

§Electives 14 

48 



t Students planning to enter the Medical School at Augusta will 
be required to take Chemistry 380 as part of their science major. 
A number of other medical colleges require this course specifically. 

t The foreign language requirement is the same as for the B.S. 
degree. 

§ These electives must, include not less than 5 hours in the Social 
Science Division and Foreign Language to complete requirements as 
under footnote above. 



92 



THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS SET BY THE AMERICAN MEDICAL 

ASSOCIATION FOR ADMISSION TO APPROVED MEDICAL 

COLLEGES 

These requirements include only two years of preliminary college 
work and are satisfied by the following University of Georgia 
courses: Chemistry 21-22-23, 340 a-b; Zoology 25-26, or Botany 
21-22; Physics 20-25-26; English 2 and 4 a-b-c; Mathematics 20; 
electives from non-science subjects four courses. While in special 
cases the University will register a student for this program, it is 
not recommended, as its completion will not admit to any medical 
colleges in Georgia or to many standard colleges in the United 
States. In all cases two years of Military Science work (Military 
Science 1-2) is required of all male students where not excused for 
physical disability or other reasons by the Dean and Commandant. 

CURRICULUM IN SCIENCE FOR PRE-MEDICAL 
TECHNOLOGISTS 

This is a program of study leading to the Bachelor of Science 
degree arranged to provide in the first three years' work the back- 
ground for a medical technician's course. The University of Geor- 
gia does not offer a professional "technician" course. 



Freshman 

Hours 

English 2 a-b-c 9 

Social Science 1 a-b-c 9 

Human Biology 1-2 10 

Chemistry 21-22-23 15 

Mathematics 20 _ 5 

Military Science 1 (men) 

or 
Physical Education 1 (women) 5 



53 

Junior 

Hours 

Humanities 1 a-b-c 9 

Physics 25-26 10 

Bacteriology 5 

Social Science (Sociology 307 
and Psychology 1 recom- 
mended ) ._. 10 

Chemistry 380 5 

Electives 9 

48 



Sophomore 

Hours 

French or German 10 

Zoology 25-26 10 

Chemistry 340 a-b 10 

Physics 20 5 

Mathematics 21 or 356 5 

Social Science 4 5 

Military Science 2 (men) 

or 
Physical Education 2 (women) 5 

50 

Senior 

Hours 
Electives so chosen as to com- 
plete requirements for the 
Bachelor of Science degree 45 



Total 196 



GENERAL INFORMATION 93 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY 

This degree course offers training in the field of chemistry and its 
allied sciences for students who desire to enter commercial or gov- 
ernment laboratories, to enter the teaching profession, to become 
associated with chemical industries in a non-techincal position, or 
to pursue graduate work in chemistry in order to enter some field 
of research or college teaching. 

JUNIOR DIVISION REQUIREMENTS 

Freshman Sophomore 

Hours Hours 

Social Science 1 a-b-c 9 Physics 20 5 

English 2 a-b-c 9 Social Science 4 5 

Chemistry 21-22-23 15 German 101-102-103 15 

French 101-102-103 15 Chemistry 340 a-b, 380 15 

Military Science IB (men) Mathematics 5 

or Military Science 2B (men) 
Physical Education 1 (women) 5 or 

Physical Education 2 (women) 5 

53 50 

An average of B or better is required on all freshman and sopho- 
more work in order to register in the Senior Division for this degree. 

TOTAL REQUIREMENTS 

Social Science — 19 hours. Socal Studies 1-2-4 and one other. 

Foreign Language) — through French 3 and through German 3 (com- 
bined high school and college) 

Mathematics — through Mathematics 355. 

English — 19 hours — English Composition and Literature. 

♦Physics — 15 hours — Physics 25-26 and one other. 

Chemistry— 77 hours — Chemistry 21-22-23-340 a-340 b-380-480-440-441 
or 481, 490 a-490 b, two of 420-421-422, two others (usually in the Division 
of Chemistry of the students' major and minor interests.) 

Comprehensive Examination. The passing of a comprehensive ex- 
amination (embracing the principal divisions of chemistry). This ex- 
amination to be taken toward the end of the senior year. 

Military Science or Physical Education — 10 hours — Military Science 
1-2 or Physical Education 1-2. 

Electtves — A sufficient number of hours to make a total of not less 
than 196 hours. 



* Should a student enter the University without high school Physics, 
satisfactory to the physics department, he will take Physics 20, 25, 
and 26 in order to fulfill this requirement. 



DIVISION OF FINE ARTS 

The Division of Fine Arts is administered by the College of Arts 
and Sciences. It includes Music, Art, Dramatic Art, and Landscape 
Architecture. The function of this Division is to give training in 
appreciation, to help students form standards of taste, to promote 
culture in the entire community, and to train specialized perform- 
ing artists and teachers. To accomplpish these objectives this de- 
partment collaborates with other departments, especially those of 
Languages, Education, and Home Economics. In the College of 
Arts and Sciences curricula, of four years are offered, with a major 
in Music, Art, and Landscape Architecture. 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

Junior Division courses for a major in music include the regular 
academic courses in addition to courses in elementary theory, and 
harmony. These courses are designed to give the student a prac- 
tical knowledge of the theory of music, ear training, and harmony. 
The Senior Division courses ae designed to give the student a 
broader and more cultural background in music. A limited number 
of practical courses in music may be taken for credit. See expla- 
nation at the end of course announcements in Music. 

The extra curricula work of the music department is outstand- 
ing. The Men's Glee Club made their thirtieth annual tour in the 
Spring of 1940. The Women's Glee Club with the Men and the 
Little Symphony Orchestra presented the oratorio "Elijah" in Ath- 
ens and Atlanta. 

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS— MAJOR IN MUSIC 

JUNIOR DIVISION REQUIREMENTS 

Freshman Sophomoee 

Hours Hours 

Social Science 1 a-b-c 9 Social Science 4 5 

♦Physical Science 1-2 *Human Biology 1-2 

or or 

♦Human Biology 1-2 10 *Physical Science 1-2 10 

♦Mathematics 20 5 Humanities 1 a-b-c 9 

English 2 a-b-c __. 9 f Foreign Language 10 

English 2 a-b-c 9 Military Science (men) 

Military Science (men) or 

or Physical Education (women) 5 

Physical Education (women).... 5 Music 22 ..__ 5 

Music 2 5 Music 32 a-b 6 

Music 1 5 Music 33 _ _ _ 3 

Music 31 _ 5 

53 53 

[ 94] 



GENERAL INFORMATION 95 

t A limited number of such courses can be taken for credit (see 
course announcements). The total is limited to four courses, not 
more than one for each academic year. 

* See footnote A.B. Junior Division requirements. 

t The foreign language requirements are the same as those for 
the Junior Division in the Bachelor of Arts degree. See footnote, 
page 79. 

SENIOR DIVISION REQUIREMENTS 

The major concentration in Music consists of the following courses: 

Hours 

Music Literature Courses: 340, 341, 342, 353, 356, 357, 360, 361 24 

Music Theoretical Courses: 370 5 

Public School Music 5 

Art 5 

English 420-422 (or two other approved courses) 10 

Greek Literature 456-457 __ _ 10 

59 

Electtves — A sufficient number of hours to make a total of not less 
than 90 hours in the Senior Divsion and 196 altogether. Music 
373 and Music 3 71 are recommended as well as courses in Fine Arts. 
English, History and Foreign Languages. 

Total requirements for degree — 19 6 hours. 

In addition to the above, performance satisfactory to the director 
is required in Piano, Organ, Violin or Voice. 

THE DEPARTMENT OF ART 

The aim of the Department of Art is to provide training in the 
fundamental principles of the creative visual arts as well as the 
study of art history and appreciation. This basic training com- 
bined with the liberal education provided in the Junior Division, 
thoroughly prepares the student to develop in the professional 
field. Those not professionally inclined will gain a broad, cultural 
education. 

In the Junior Division 24 hours of art are required in addition 
to the general academic requirements. These Junior Division 
courses, which form a well-balanced program of study, prepare stu- 
dents for the more advanced art courses offered in the Senior 
Division. 

On entering the Senior Division the student selects his major 
field of concentration. The four majors are Painting and Drawing, 
Design and Crafts, Commercial Art, and Art Education. Electives 
for the completion of the minimum 196 hours in both Junior and 
Senior Divisions, are required for the degree of Bachelor of Fine 
Arts. 



96 



THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS— MAJOR IN ART 
JUNIOR DIVISION REQUIREMENTS 



Freshman 

Hours 

English 2 a-b-c 9 

Social Science 1 a-b-c 9 

♦Physical Science 1-2 

or 

♦Human Biology 1-2 10 

♦Mathematics 20 5 

Art 30 5 

Art 40 5 

Art 50 5 

Military Science (men) 

or 
Physical Education (women)— 5 



Sophomoee 

Hours 

Humanities 1 a-b-c 9 

♦Physical Science 1-2 

or 

♦Human Biology 1-2 10 

tForeign Language 10 

Landscape Architecture 14 3 

Art 41 3 

Art 51 3 

Social Science 4 5 

Military Science (men) 

or 
Physical Education (women).... 5 
Electives 5 



53 



53 



SENIOR DIVISION REQUIREMENTS 
After completion of the Junior Division requirements all stu- 
dents entering the Senior Division select their major field of con- 
centration from one of the following: 

I. ART EDUCATION 



Junior 

Hours 

Art 211 (Design) _. 5 

Art 221 (Drawing) 5 

Art 270 (Modelling) 5 

Art 281 (History of Art) 5 

Art 282 (History of Art) 5 

Art 283 (History of Art) 5 

Electives to complete 19 6 hours. 



Senior 

Hours 

Art 212 (Design) 5 

Art 222 (Drawing) 5 

Art 315 (Art Education) 5 

Art 210 (Lettering) _ 5 

Art 241 (Water Color) 5 

Art 435 (Gr.) 635 (Art Struc- 
ture) 5 



II. COMMERCIAL ART 



Junior 

Hours 

Art 211 (Design) 5 

Art 221 (Drawing) 5 

Art 222 (Drawing) 5 

Art 223 (Drawing) 5 

Art 210 (Lettering) 5 

Art 270 (Modelling) 5 

Art 281 (History of Art) 5 

Journalism 357 5 

Electives (courses recommended in Commerce and Journalism) 
to complete 196 hours. 



Senior 
Art 209 (Commercial Design).... 5 

Art 207 (Illustration) 5 

Art 231 (Oil) 5 

Art 241 (Water Color) 5 

Art 202 (Composition) 5 

Art 282 (History of Art) 5 

Art 283 (History of Art) 5 



♦ See footnote A.B. Junior Division requirements, page 87. 

t The foreign language Junior Division requirement is the same 

as for the A.B. degree. See footnote, page 87. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



97 



III. DESIGN AND CRAFTS 



Junior 

Hours 

Art 210 (Lettering) _ 5 

Art 211 (Design) .._. 5 

Art 221 (Drawing) 5 

Art 222 (Drawing) 5 

Art 270 (Modelling) 5 

Art 281 (History of Art) 5 

Art 286 (Historic Ornament).— 5 



Senior 

Hours 
Art 212 (Design) 5 

Art 241 (Water Color) _ 5 

Art 282 (History of Art) 5 

Art 283 (History of Art) 5 

Art 213 (Design) 5 



In addition to the above, three five hour courses in pottery or 
crafts are required. 

Electives to complete 196 hours required for degree. 



IV. PAINTING AND DRAWING 



Junior 

Hours 

Art 211 (Design) 5 

Art 221 (Drawing) 5 

Art 222 (Drawing) 5 

Art 223 (Drawing) 5 

Art 270 (Modeling) 5 

Art 281 (History of Art) 5 

Art 282 (History of Art) 5 

Art 231 (Painting) 5 

Art 241 (Water Color) 5 

Electives to complete 196 hours. 



Senior 

Hours 

Art 202 (Composition) 5 

Art 232 (Painting) 5 

Art 233 (Painting) 5 

Art 234 (Painting) 5 

Art 242 (Water Color) 5 

Art 283 (History of Art) 5 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

Landscape Architecture deals with the improvement of land for 
human use and enjoyment. It includes the design, construction, 
planting and maintenance of farmsteads, estates, and other home 
grounds, public parks, cemeteries, school grounds, country clubs and 
golf courses, and subdivisions, city planning, and other planning 
problems. 

This course aims, first, toward the general education as a founda- 
tion for the professional practice, and, second, toward the prepara- 
tion of men under southern conditions for this work in the South. 



98 



THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



BACHELOR OP FINE ARTS— MAJOR IN LANDSCAPE 
ARCHITECTURE 

JUNIOR DIVISION REQUIREMENTS 



Freshman 

Hours 

Social Science 1 a-b-c 9 

♦Physical Science 1-2 

or 

Human Biology 1-2 .....10 

Mathematics 20 5 

English 2 a-b-c 9 

Military Science (men) 

or 
Physical Education (women).... 5 

Landscape Architecture 11 5 

Landscape Architecture 12 5 

Art 50 5 



SOPHOMOKE 

Hours 

Social Science 4 5 

Human Biology 1-2 

or 

Physical Science 1-2 10 

Humanities 1 a-b-c __ 9 

fForeign Language 10 

Military Science (men) 

or 
Physical Education (women).... 5 

Landscape Architecture 13 3 

Landscape 1 Architecture 70 3 

Art 51 3 

Elective 5 



53 



53 



SENIOR DIVISION REQUIREMENTS 



Junior 

Hours 
Land. Arch. 350 (Construction) 5 
Land. Arch. 351 (Trees and 

Shrubs) 5 

Land. Arch. 352 (Plant Ma- 
terials) 5 

Land. Arch. 356 a-b (Landscape 

Design) 6 

Land. Arch. 370 b (Theory of 

Landscape Design) 3 

Art 221 (Drawing) 5 

Horticulture 1 _ 5 

Forestry 364 3 

Agr. Eng. 13 (Surveying) 5 

Elective 3 



Seniob 

Hours 
Land. Arch. 353 a-b (City Plan- 
ning) 6 

Land. Arch. 354 (Plant Design) 5 

Land. Arch. 355 (Thesis) 5 

Land. Arch. 357 a-b (Adv. De- 
sign) 6 

Land. Arch. 360 (History of 

Architecture) 5 

Art 222 (Drawing) 5 

Art 241 (Water Color) 5 

Speech 1 5 

Elective 3 



45 
Total requirements for degree — 196 hours. 

TRIPS 



45 



A trip of a week's extent will be taken on alternate years by 
Senior Division majors to Flat Rock and Asheville, N. C, and Smoky 
Mountains National Park, and to Thomasville, Ga., and points in 
Florida for purpose of study and observation. Week-end trips will 
be made to Augusta, Atlanta, and LaGrange, Ga., and Aiken and 
Charleston, S. C. 



* See footnote under A.B. 

t The foreign language Junior Division requirement is the same 
as for the Bachelor of Arts degree, see footnote, page 87. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 99^ 

DEPARTMENT OF DRAMATIC ART 

This is a new department, offering courses in the history of the 
theater, acting, and technical phases of dramatic production. Stu- 
dents interested in this course should take the Bachelor of Arts 
Junior Division, program with Dramatic Art 30 as freshman elective 
and other dramatic art courses in the* sophomore year. 

For courses in this department see course announcements in back 
of catalogue. 



100 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

ANNOUNCEMENTS CONCERNING SCHOOLS AND COL- 
LEGES OTHER THAN THE COLLEGE OP 
ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Each of the Schools and Colleges whose degree requirements are 
listed below publishes a special bulletin describing its work, equip- 
ment, degree requirements and courses of instruction in more detail 
than the brief statement included here. Such bulletins will he sent 
on request by the Department of Public Relations, The University of 
Georgia, or the School or College concerned. 

SCHOOL OF LAW 

BACHELOR OF LAWS 
REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREE 

The degree offered by the School of Law is that of Bachelor of 
Laws. In order to receive this degree, a student must have completed 
not less than 120 quarter hours of work with a weighted average grade 
of C. 

Second year students must, and third year students may, if 
they so desire, earn; one quarter hour of credit towards the require- 
ments for the degree by registering for and completing an essay on 
a legal topic to be selected with the approval of a member of the 
faculty. Every essay must be submitted on or before April 10, 
must represent a minimum of 40 hours work, and must be approved 
by three members of the Faculty. 

No student may receive a degree without the favorable recom- 
mendation of the Faculty and this may be withheld for satisfactory 
cause although the required work has been completed. 

The 120 quarter hours of work on the basis of which a degree is 
granted must include all the work of the first year, with the excep- 
tion of Family Relations. The following courses in the work of 
the second and third years are required: Constitutional Law, Equity, 
Evidence, Georgia Practice, Practice Court, and Property II. The 
course in Legal Accounting is required of all second year students 
except thosel excused by action of the Faculty. 

In order to receive a degree, a student must satisfy not only the 
requirements specified above but, unless admitted with advanced 
standing, must have been in attendance at the Law School for nine 
full quarters. In all cases the work of the three quarters imme- 
diately preceding the granting of a degree must be completed in 
this School. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 10_1 

A student who) attends a full summer session is credited with one 
quarter of residence toward the degree requirements. 

A student who has completed three years of work in the College 
of Arts and Sciences or in the School of Commerce may substitute 
the first year of work of the Law School' for his senior work and 
thus at the end of his fourth year of study receive the degree of 
bachelor of arts, bachelor of science or bachelor of science in Com- 
merce. On the successful completion of the two remaining years of 
work in the Law School he will be entitled to receive the degree 
of bachelor of laws. A student may in this manner receive in six 
years both the academic and law degrees. 

The academic requirements for these combination degrees are 
shown in this bulletin under degree requirements of the College of 
Arts and Sciences for Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science, and 
under the School of Commerce for Bachelor of Science in Com- 
merce. 

Candidates for degrees are required to be present in person when 
degrees are conferred. 

The Faculty of the Law School will, in its discretion, recognize 
unusual scholastic attainments of genuine distinction by awarding 
the degree of bachelor of laws summa cum laude or cum laude. 

For courses of instruction in law, see course announcements in 
back of catalogue. 

THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

The College of Agriculture, the official Land-Grant institution 
for Georgia, holds membership in the American Association of 
Land-Grant Colleges and Universities and is officially designated by 
the United States Office of Education for giving college instruction 
in agriculture and agricultural engineering. 

Created a part of the University in 1872 as the State College of 
Agricultural and Mechanical Arts, it was made a separate institution 
in 1906 as the State College of Agriculture. It became a division 
of the University again in 1933. 



102 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE 
JUNIOR DIVISION REQUIREMENTS 

Freshman Sophomore 

Hours Hours 

English 2 a-b-c (Grammar and Mathematics 1 5 

Composition) 9 English 6 a-b-c 9 



Social Science 1 a-b-c 9 Physics 20 (Survey) 5 

Botany 21 (for Agricultural Botany 22 (for Agricultural 

students) 5 students) 5 

Poultry 60 5 Horticulture 1 (General) 5 

Chemistry 21-24 (for Agricul- Agronomy 10 5 

tural students— General in- Agronomy 1 5 

organic and applied) 10 Agricultural Engineering 20-60- 

Animal Husbandry 3 5 70 9 

Agricultural Economics 3 5 Military Science 2 5 

Military Science 1 _ 5 

* 53 53 

* Agricultural Student Guidance. Required of all Freshmen in the 
College of Agriculture. Fall Quarter. One meeting per week. 

A problem course dealing with problems of adjustment to college 
life; college aims; how to study; nature and importance of agriculture 
as an industry; significant historical developments in agriculture; 
present-day economic and social problems and how they are being 
solved; vocational opportunities in agriculture; nature and purpose of 
the agricultural curricula; and how to choose courses of study. 



SENIOR DIVISION REQUIREMENTS 

Maj or 20 Quarter Hours 

To be in Animal Husbandry, Agronomy, Agricul- 
tural Economics and Rural Sociology, Horticul- 
ture, Poultry, Plant Pathology, Chemistry, Voca- 
tional Education or General Agriculture. 

Agricultural Science Selections 20 Quarter Hours 

From the following: Bacteriology 350, Plant 
Pathology 353, Animal Husbandry 382, Plant 
Pathology 358, Horticulture 355, Mathematics 356, 
Chemistry 346. 

Minor 1 —.10 Quarter Hours 

Must be in Senior Division of one department in 
the University. 

Minor 2 10 Quarter Hours 

Must be in the College of Agriculture. 

General Electives 30 Quarter Hours 

Total - — - 90 Quarter Hours 

Total, Junior Division 106 Quarter Hours 

Total Course 196 Quarter Hours 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



103 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURAL 
ENGINEERING 

JUNIOR DIVISION REQUIREMENTS 



Freshman 

Hours 
Agricultural Engineering 4 a-b 

(Engineering Drawing) 6 

Agricultural Engineering 8 

(Descriptive Geometry) 3 

Chemistry 21 and 24 (Inor- 

gaic Chemistry) 10 

English 2 a-b-c (English Com- 
position) 9 

Mathematics 30 (Trigonometry) 5 

Mathematics 4 (Algebra) __ 5 

Mathematics 2 (Analytical Ge- 
ometry) 5 

Physics 20 (Physics Survey) 5 

Military Science 1 5 



Sophomore 

Hours 

Agricultural Engineering 11 
(Statics) 5 

Agricultural Engineering 3 a-b 
(Farm Shop) 6 

Agricultural Engineering 22 
(Soil and Water Conserva- 
tion) 3 

English 6 a-b-c (Business Eng- 
lish) 9 

Mathematics 3 (Calculus) 5 

Physics 27, 28 and 29 (College 
Physics for Engineers) 15 

Agronomy 10 (Principles of 
Soil Management) 5 

Military Science 2 5 



53 

SENIOR DIVISION 
Junior 

Hours 

Agricultural Engineering 350 
(Statics) 5 

Agricultural Engineering 351 
(Dynamics) 5 

Agricultural Engineering 353 
(Materials of Construction).... 5 

Agricultural Engineering 355 
(Strength of Materials) 5 

Agricultural Engineering 356 
(Hydraulics) 5 

Agricultural Engineering 361 
(Farm Machinery) 5 

Agricultural Engineering 390 
(Engineering Bibliographic 
Research) 5 

Agronomy 1 (Field Crop Pro- 
duction) 5 

History 1 (American Govern- 
ment) 5 

Electives 3 



REQUIREMENTS 

Senior 

Hours 

Agricultural Engineering 362 
(Farm Motors) 5 

Agricultural Engineering 370 
(Heat Engineering) 5 

Agricultural Engineering 371 
(Farm Structures) 5 

Agricultural Engineering 372 
(Sanitation and Water Sup- 
ply) 3 

Agricultural Engineering 384 
(D.C. Machinery) 3 

Agricultural Engineering 386 
(D.C. Machinery) 5 

Agricultural Engineering 388 
(Rural Electrification) 3 

Agricultural Engineering Con- 
centration 404, 405, 406 or 
407 _ 3 

Agronomy 320 (Advanced Crop 
Production) or Animal Hus- 
bandry 371 (Livestock Pro- 
duction) 5 

Agricultural Economics 301 
(Farm Management) or 304 
(Marketing) 5 

Electives 6 



48 



48 



104 



THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



Electives to be chosen with approval of Agricultural Engineering 
Department. 

Total Requirements — 202 hours. 

THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

Established in 1903, the University's School of Pharmacy has 
taken an active lead in pharmaceutical education in the South. The 
School holds membership in the American Association of Colleges 
of Pharmacy and is on the accredited list of the American Council 
of Pharmaceutical Education. 



JUNIOR DIVISION 

Freshman 

Hours 

English 2 a-b-c 9 

Social Science 1-2 a-b-c 9 

Human Biology 1-2 .10 

Pharmacy 1 5 

Pharmacy 2 5 

Mathematics 20 5 

Botany 21 or Zoology 25 5 

Military Science 5 



REQUIREMENTS 

SOPHOMOEE 

Hours 

Chemistry 21-22-23 15 

Physics 20 5 

Pharmacy 3 6 

Pharmacy 4 6 

Pharmacy 5 6 

Botany 22 or Zoology 26 5 

Zoology 380 5 

Military Science 5 



53 



53 



SENIOR DIVISION REJUIREMENTS 



Junior 

Hours 

Chemistry 340 a-b 10 

Chemistry 380 5 

Bacteriology 350-351 10 

Pharmacy 351 3 

Pharmacy 352 3 

Pharmacy 353 3 

Pharmacy 356 5 

Pharmacy 357 5 

Pharmacy 358 5 

Zoology 309 5 



Senior 

Hours 

Pharmacy 361 5 

Pharmacy 362 5 

Pharmacy 363 5 

Pharmacy 364 5 

Pharmacy 365 5 

Pharmacy 366 5 

Pharmacy 367 5 

Pharmacy 368 5 

Commerce 6 5 



54 
Total requirements, 205 hours. 



45 



THE PEABODY COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Established in 1907 as the School of Education of the University 
of Georgia, that unit in 193 2 was made the Peabody College of 
Education. Comprised of undergraduate, graduate, research, and 
service, and the laboratory schools the Peabody College of Educa- 
tion is accredited by the American Association of Teachers Col- 
leges. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 105 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF 
SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 1 

JUNIOR DIVISION REQUIREMENTS 

Freshman Sophomore 

Hours Hours 

English 2 a-b-c 9 Humanities 1 a-b-c 9 

Social Science 1 a-b-c 9 English 8 or Selected Elective— 5 

Education 1 5 Social Science 4 5 

History 1 5 *Physical Science 1-2 10 

♦Human Biology 1-2 _ 10 Physical Science for Teachers _ 5 

Biology for Teachers 5 Art 17 3 

♦Mathematics 20 5 Music 43 3 

Military Science (men) Military Science (men) 

or or 

Physical Education (women) .... 5 Physical Education (women)... 5 

Electives — must be approved by 
the Dean of the College of 

Education 8 

53 53 



SENIOR DIVISION REQUIREMENTS 

Education Courses: 304, 421, 371, 381 or 392, 376-377 30 

Areas of Concentration: 

1. The following courses are required of all students: 

Physical Education 376 5 

Rural Economics — Agronomy 310 5 

Rural Sociology — Agronomy 431 5 

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology — Sociology 327.. 5 



20 

2. Additional hours selected through conference with the 

Dean in relation to the field or area of concentration 40 



* Students who take the mathematics-science freshman placement 
examinations and make a sufficiently high score on any course to 
justify the assumption that they have essentially mastered this 
course will be exempt from the course as a degree requirement. In 
such case no credit hous are allowed for the course, but an ap- 
proved elective is substituted for it. 

Human Biology 1-2 is a prerequisite for the course Biology for 
Teachers. 

Physical Science 1-2 is a prerequisite for the course Physical 
Science for Teachers. 

1 Note: All students who are candidates for this degree are en- 
couraged to offer a minimum of 15 college quarter hours in some 
foreign language — Latin, French, German, or Spanish. Two years 
in one foreign language taken in the high school may be substi- 
tuted for this requirement. 



106 



THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



B.S. IN EDUCATION WITH A MAJOR IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

(MEN) 

JUNIOR DIVISION REQUIREMENTS 



Freshman 

Hours 

Social Science 1 a-b-c 9 

English 2 a-b-c 9 

Mathematics 20 5 

Physical Science 1-2 .....10 

Education 1 5 

Elective ..10 

Military Science 5 



Sophomore 

Hours 

Humanities 1 a-b-c ._ 9 

Electives 9 

Human Biology 1-2 .10 

Social Science 4 5 

Physical Education 43, 44, 45.-15 
Military Science 5 



53 



53 



SENIOR DIVISION REQUIREMENTS 



Junior 

Hours 
Physical Education 380, 381, 382 

or 384, 385, 386 ......18 

Education 304, 421 10 

Teaching Minor (in one field) 15 

Elective 3 



Senior 

Hours 
Physical Education 384, 385, or 

387, 388 10 

Education 381 (plus one other 

approved ) 10 

Minor (in same field as Junior 

Minor ) .15 

Elective .10 



45 
Total Requirements for Degree — 196 hours. 



45 



B.S. IN EDUCATION WITH A MAJOR IN AGRICULTURE 
(VOCATIONAL EDUCATION) 

JUNIOR DIVISION REQUIREMENTS 



Freshman 

Hours 
English 2 a-b-c (Grammar and 

Composition) 9 

Social Science 1 a-b-c 9 

Botany 21 _ __ 5 

Poultry 60 5 

Chemistry 21-24 10 

Animal Husbandry 3 _ _ 5 

Agricultural Economics 1 or 3„ 5 
Military Scence 5 



Sophomore 

Hours 

Mathematics 20 5 

English 6 a-b-c _ 9 

Physics 20 (Survey) _ 5 

Botany 22 5 

Horticulture 1 (General) 5 

Soils 10 5 

Farm Crops 1 5 

Agricultural Engineering 20-60- 

70 9 

Military Science 2 5 



53 



53 



* Agricultural Student Guidance. Required of all freshmen in the 
College of Agriculture. Fall Quarter. One meeting per week. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



10' 



SENIOR DIVISION REQUIREMENTS 



Junior 

Hours 

tScience Selection — 20 

Bacteriology 350 5 

Plant Pathology 353 
or 

Animal Husbandry 382 5 

Plant Pathology 358 5 

Horticulture 355 _ 5 

Minor I _ 10 

as follows: 

Education 304 5 

Education 421 5 

Other requirements with the approval of the major adviser 30 hours 
from the following: 



Senior 

Hours 
Major -- -20 

Education 451 5 

Education 452 5 

Education 346 5 

Education 347 — . 5 

Minor II 10 

as follows: 

Rural Org. 301 5 

Soils 458 5 



Hours 

Agricultural Engineering 3 5 

Horticulture 353 5 

Horticulture 401 5 

Animal Husbandry 373 5 

Animal Husbandry 371 5 

Poultry Husbandry 361 5 

Total Senior Division — 90 hours. 

Total Requirements — 196 hours. 



Hours 

Poultry Husbandry 362 5 

Horticulture 363 5 

Farm Crops 351 5 

Farm Crops 353 5 

Farm Crops 356 5 

Education 471 __. 5 

Forestry 2 5 



B.S. 



IN EDUCATION WITH A MAJOR IN HOME ECONOMICS 
JUNIOR DIVISION REQUIREMENTS 



Freshman 

Hours 
Home Economics 1 or Educa- 
tion 1 5 

English 2 a-b-c 9 

Social Science 1 a-b-c 9 

Art 30 5 

Home Economics 20 5 

Human Biology 1-2 10 

Psychology 1 or Speecch 8 5 

Physical Education 1 5 



Sophomore 

Hours 

Chemistry 21-22-346 15 

Physics 20 5 

Home Economics 5 5 

Home Economics 22 3 

Humanities 1 a-b-c 9 

Social Science 4 5 

Electives 6 

Physical Education 2 5 



53 

SENIOR DIVISION 
Junior 

Hours 

Education 421 or 504 5 

Education 304 5 

Education 396 5 

Home Economics 306 _ _ 5 

Home Economics 321 5 

Home Economics 351 5 

Home Economics 375 5 

Home Economics 393 5 

Electives 5 



53 

REQUIREMENTS 

Senior 

Hours 

Education 397 5 

Education 346-347 10 

Home Economics 370 .._ 5 

Home Economics 350 5 

Home Economics 390 5 

Bacteriology 350 _ 5 

Electives 10 



45 
Total Requirements for degree — 196 hours. 



45 



t Mathematics 356, Chemistry 346, or Forestry 2 may be substituted 
for any course in this group on approval of adviser. 



108 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

BACHELOR OP SCIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
FOR WOMEN 

JUNIOR DIVISION REQUIREMENTS 

Freshman Sophomore 

Hours Hours 

English 2 a-b-c 9 Humanities 1 a-b-c _ 9 

Social Science 1 a-b-c 9 Zoology 25-26 10 

Human Biology 1-2 ._ 10 Physical Science 1 5 

Chemistry 21-22 10 Social Science 4 5 

Mathematics 20 5 Education 304 5 

Education 1 5 Physical Education 7 5 

Physical Education 1 5 Physical Education 19 3 

Physical Education 2 __ 5 

Electives 6 

53 53 

SENIOR DIVISION REQUIREMENTS 

Zoology— 309 and 367 (10 hours). 

Education— 421, 552 or 555; 381; 376-77; Physical Education 366 a-b 

(30 hours). 
Physical Education— 352, 353, 360-61 (16 hours); 311, 357, 358, 359, 

368, 370, 371, 372, 376, and 384. Minimum of 19 hours. 
Electives — 

Recommended: 

General — Home Economics 351, Public Speaking, Physical 
Science 1. Additional courses in Education, Psychology, 
and Physical Education. 
Recreation — Drama 333-34-35, Sociology 307, Art, Music. 
Physiotherapy — Physics 25-26, Bacteriology 350-51, Zoology 355, 

356, 357. 
Dance— Music 3, 22, 43, 360, Drama 333-34-35, Art 17, 30 or 281. 

SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 

The School of Commerce was established in 1912. One of the lead- 
ing schools of commerce in this section, it is a member of the American 
Association of Collegiate Schools of Business, the national accrediting 
agency in its field. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMMERCE 

JUNIOR DIVISION REQUIREMENTS 

In the Junior Division the major part of the student's time is con- 
sumed by the survey courses in the Social Sciences, the Physical 
Sciences, the Biological Sciences, the Humanities, and Mathematics. 
It is the purpose of courses of this type to lay a broad foundation 
of cultural work, to the end that the student may have a fair ac- 
quaintance with the important fields of history, government, sciences, 



GENERAL INFORMATION 109 

literature, and languages, before being permitted to erect what might 
otherwise turn out to be a rather shaky superstructure of specialized 
work. 

Time is available, however, for certain introductory courses of an 
economic variety. These are Introduction to Business, Principles of 
Economics, and Elementary Accounting. 

In tabular form the Junior Division Curriculum is as follows: 

Fbeshmax Sophomore 

Hours Hours 

English 2 a-b-c 9 Humanities 1 a-b-c 9 

Social Science 1 a-b-c 9 *Physical Science 1-2 or 

♦Mathematics 20 5 Human Biology 1-2 10 

♦Physical Science 1-2 or Social Science 4 5 

Human Biology 1-2 10 Economics 55 a-b-c (Economic 

Foreign Language 10 Principles) 9 

Economics 1 (Introduction to Commerce 6-7 (Accounting) 10 

Business) 5 Elective 5 

Military Science (men) Military Science (men) 

or or 

Physical Education (women).... 5 Physical Education (women).... 5 

53 53 

♦Mathematics-Science: See footnote under Junior Division A.B. 

THE SENIOR DIVISION 

Upon completing the requirements just above listed the student 
passes into the Senior Division, in which all the courses are of an 
advanced or specialized character. The regulations of the American 
Association of Collegiate Schools of Business, of which the School 
of Commerce of the University is a member, require that not less 
than 40 per cent of the hours necessary for graduation shall be in 
subjects of an economic or business character. Seventy-four hours of 
economic and business subjects must, therefore, be taken to meet 
this minimum requirement. Since 24 hours are accounted for by the 
Junior Division introductory economic and business subjects, a min- 
imum of 50 quarter hours of economic and business subjects remains 
for the Senior Division. 

The regulations of the American Association also require that 40 
per cent of the total degree requirement shall be in fields other than 
economics and business. The remaining 20 per cent of the hour 
requirement may be taken in either economic and business subjects 
or subjects outside of this field, but the practicce of this School has 
always been to insist that about 50 per cent of the total requirement 
shall be in economics and business. 



110 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

THE CONCENTRATION GROUPS 

Since students vary materially in their needs or desires, it is 
thought desirable to offer quite a number of fields of concentration 
in the Senior Division. The groups are: Accounting, Finance, Gen- 
eral Economics, Industrial Relations, Public Administration, Secre- 
tarial Studies, Statistics and Marketing. In each group nine sub- 
jects, totaling 45 quarter-hours, are listed as requirements. 

The student is free to choose any one of these concentration groups. 
He is required to schedule all of the courses in the group chosen, 
and, in addition, elect four other courses from among the general 
offerings of the School. The 13 courses thus required amount to 65 
hours which added to the 24 hours of economic and busiDess subjects 
in the Junior Division raise the total to 89 hours, or approximately 
50 per cent of the total degree requirement. The Commerce student 
under this arrangement would have five free electives to be chosen 
from any of the departments of the University, though they may be 
taken from the offerings of the School of Commerce. The selection 
of these elective courses must be done in every case in conference 
with the Professor in Charge of the concentration group. 

Major Concentration Groups 

ACCOUNTING 
Instructor in Charge: Professor H. M. Heckman 



Commerce 


354 


Intermediate Accounting 


Commerce 


412 


Auditing 


Commerce 


413 


Cost Accounting 


Commerce 


415 


Income Tax Accounting 


Commerce 


416 


Accounting Problems 


Commerce 


419 


Tax Accounting 


Commerce 


370 


Business Law, first course 


Commerce 


371 


Business Law, second course 


Mathematics 


356 


Elementary Statistics 


Mathematics 


357 


Advanced Statistics 



FINANCE 
Instructor in Charge: Professor G. W. Sutton 



Economics 


450 


Money and Credit 


Commerce 


488 


Securities Market 


Commerce 


426 


Banking 


Commerce 


430 


Corporation Finance 


Commerce 


431 


Investments 


Economics 


486 


Labor Problems 


Economics 


360 


Marketing 


Mathematics 


356 


Elementary Statistics 


Mathematics 


357 


Advanced Statistics 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



111 



GENERAL ECONOMICS 
Instructor in Charge: Professor R. P. Brooks 



Economics 


407 


History of Economic Thought 


Economics 


406 


Advanced Economic Theory 


Economics 


437 


Comparative Economics 


Economics 


434 


Public Finance 


Economics 


436 


Business Cycles 


Economics 


486 


Labor Problems 


Economics 


380 


International Trade 


Economics 


450 


Money and Credit 


Mathematics 


356 


Elementary Statistics 



INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS 
Instructor in Charge: Assistant Professor R. T. Segrest 
Economics 384 Social Security 
Economics 486 Labor Problems 
Economcis 385 Personnel Administration 
Commerce 450 Money and Credit 
Commerce 308 Business Correspondence 
Economics 436 Business Cycles 
Psychology 1 Elementary Psychology 
Economics 434 Public Finance 
Mathematics 356 Elementary Statistics 

MARKETING 
Instructor in Charge: Professor J. W. Jenkins 



Economics 


360 


Marketing Principles 


Economics 


361 


Marketing Problems 


Commerce 


462 


Retailing 


Commerce 


375 


Transportation 


Economics 


465 


Marketing Research and Analysis 


Commerce 


464 


Sales Management 


Economics 


459 


Economic Geography of the Old World 


Economics 


450 


Money and Credit 


Mathematics 


356 


Elementary Statistics 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 
Instructor in Charge: Professor L. B. Raisty 



Economics 434 

Economics 435 

Economics 441 

Economics 442 

History 406 

History 481 

History 482 

Economics 384 

Economics 418 

Mathematics 356 

Sociology 370 
Note: History 
Sophomore year. 



1, 



Public Finance 

State and Local Public Finance 
Public Administration 

County and Municipal Administration in Georgia 
State Government 
Political Science 

American Government and Politics 
Social Security 
Municipal Accounting 
Elementary Statistics 
Public Welfare Administration 
American Government, should be taken in the 



112 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

STATISTICS 

Instructor in Charge: Associate Professor B. P. Beckwith 
Mathematics 356 Elementary Statistics 
Mathematics 357 Advanced Statistics 
Mathematics 361 Mathematics of Investment 
Commerce 354 Intermediate Accounting 
Commerce 416 Accounting Problems 
Economics 384 Social Security- 
Economics 386 Labor Problems 
Commerce 431 Investments 
Economics 434 Public Finance 

SECRETARIAL STUDIES 

Instructor in Charge: Assistant Peofessor Herman A. Ellis 
Commerce 300 a-b-c Shorthand 

Typewriting, first course 

Typewriting, second course 

Typewriting, third course 

Business Correspondence 

Office Training 

Business Law, first course 

Social Security 

Elementary Statistics 

Income Tax Accounting 

MAJOR IN ECONOMICS IN THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

Candidates for the Bachelor of Arts degree upon entering the 
Senior Division are required to select a major division from which 
Senior Division courses must be taken totaling at least 40 credit 
hours. One of the major divisions which may thus be elected by 
the applicants for the Bachelor of Arts degree is the division of 
Social Sciences, and Economics is one of the departments in this 
division. Students registered for the A.B. degree who desire to 
major in Economics will take courses from the concentration group 
"General Economics." From this group, on the approval of the 
major professor and the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, 
the major program may be arranged. 

COMBINATION COURSE IN COMMERCE AND LAW 

Business training, not only in General Economics but in Account- 
ing, Corporate Organization and Finance, Taxation and in numer- 
ous other specialized fields has become essential to the lawyer. 
Indeed the time has come when many law firms find their practice 
largely confined to acting as consultants to business executives and 
it is imperative that they have a thorough acquaintance with the 
conduct of modern business. 



Commerce 


303 


Commerce 


304 


Commerce 


305 


Commerce 


308 


Commerce 


310 


Commerce 


370 


Economics 


384 


Mathematics 


356 


Commerce 


415 



GENERAL INFORMATION 113 

It would be an ideal arrangement if prospective lawyers could 
pass first through a School of Business before taking up the study 
of law. Such a course, however, normally requires seven years, a 
greater expendture of time and money than students can usually 
afford. It was with the idea of shortening the time somewhat and 
lessening the cost that the School of Commerce and the School of 
Law of the University have arranged a combined curriculum which 
makes it possible to complete both courses in six years. 

Students who desire to take this combination course will register 
for the regular Junior Division program, except that they will sub- 
stitute for the elective in the sophomore year Mathematics 356, 
Elementary Statistics. This substitution will enable the combination 
student to get 29 hours of credits in subjects of an economic and 
business character in the Junior Division. By scheduling economic 
and business subjects only in his junior year, that is to say the first 
year of the Senior Division, he can just meet the minimum require- 
ment of 40 per cent of economic and business subjects required by 
the American Association. He would not have had, it is true, quite 
so extensive a program of specialized business subjects, since the 
regular Commerce student is required to have considerably more 
than the minimum. For the most part, however, this arrangement 
amounts to the acceptance by the School of Commerce of the first 
year law as a substitute for the free electives which the Commerce 
student ordinarily has. 

NOTE IN FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

The Bachelor of Science in Commerce degree requires four or five 
courses in Foreign Languages. Students enter under one or the 
other of two conditions with respect to the language requirement. 
First: those who offer for entrance two or more units of a Foreign 
Language (Greek, Latin, French, German, or Spanish). These are 
required to take at least two courses in college, in French, German, 
or Spanish, (a) If such a student chooses to continue in college 
the language he used for entrance, he is required to take courses 
103 and 104 and these two courses will meet the language require- 
ment, (b) If he chooses some other of the modern languages, he 
must carry it through couse 103, that is to say, he must take three 
courses, making a total of five, including the entrance credits. Sec- 
ond: Those who enter without any foreign language credits. These 
may elect French, German or Spanish, and must take courses 101, 
102 and 103. Such a student may continue the language through 
course 104 and thus meet the requirement. If, however, after the 
third course, he prefers to discontinue the language and begin an- 
other, he must take courses 101 and 102 of the second language, 
or a total of five courses. 



114 THB UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

HENBY W. GRADY SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM 

The School of Journalism was established in 1915 and named for 
the illustrious editor, orator and statesman, Henry W. Grady, in 
1921. A member of the American Association of Schools and De- 
partments of Journalism, it is recognized as one of the four Class 
A schools of journalism in the Southeast. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN JOURNALISM 

JUNIOR DIVISION REQUIREMENTS 

Freshman Sophomore 

Hours Hours 

English Composition 2 a-b-c _ 9 Social Science 4 5 

Social Science 1 a-b-c. _ _ 9 Physical Science 1-2 

♦Physical Science 1-2 or 

or Human Biology 1-2 10 

Human Biology 1-2 ____ .—10 Humanities 1 a-b-c 9 

Mathematics 20 - 5 Journalism 20, 30, 40 15 

t Foreign Language 10 Military Science (men) 

Journalism 1 ~ 5 or 

Military Science (men) Physical Education (women).— 5 

or Elective 9 

Physical Education (women).— 5 

53 53 

SENIOR DIVISION REQUIREMENTS 

Major in Journalism of 42 hours, normally including 351, 352, 
353, 354, 355, 356, 357, 360, and two courses from 358, 359, 363,a, 
363b, 364, 367, 369, and 370. 

A student entering the School of Journalism with full Junior 
Division credit, but without Journalism 1, 20, 30, and 40, will be ex- 
pected to take the last three courses and Journalism 3 50 in addi- 
tion to those listed in the foregoing paragraph. 

A student who has received the A.B. degree from a college belong- 
ing to a standard, regional association may satisfy the requirements 



* See footnote under A.B. Junior Division, page 87. 

t Twenty hours (combined high school and Junior Division) from 
French, German, Greek, Latin, or Spanish. At least ten hours in 
one language must be taken in college and this must not duplicate 
language courses taken in high school. Spanish is recommended 
only for those who can definitely foresee a use for this language in 
their journalistic work. Students choosing Spanish in college will 
be required to carry this language through Spanish 103. Students 
who contemplate graduate work are advised to take French or 
German. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 115 

for the A.B. in Journalism degree with a minimum of 45 hours in 
Journalism, selected with the approval of the Director of the School 
of Journalism. Such a student must be in residence at the Univer- 
sity three quarters. 

Supplement Majob of 24 to 27 Hours, or two Supplementary 
Minobs of 12 to 15 hours each, to be chosen from Art, Commerce, 
Economics, Education, English, Foreign Language, Geography, His- 
tory, Home Economics, Laboratory Science, Landscape Architecture, 
Music, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology. 

Electtves to complete a minimum of 196 hours for the Junior and 
Senior Division. All majors, minors, and electives shall be chosen 
with the approval of the Director of the School of Journalism. These 
are determined by the phase of journalism in which the student is 
especially interested, and are grouped in approved sequences. Some 
specific courses in other divisions of the University from which jour- 
nalism majors may make appropriate and useful selections are: 

Commerce 300 a-b-c (Shorthand), 6 (Principles of Accounting), 
370-371 (Business Law); Economics 5 (Principles of Economics) or 
Economics 55 a-b-c (Principles of Economics), 333 (American Eco- 
nomic History), 350 (Money and Credit), 355 (Economic Prob- 
lems); Education 1 (Introduction), 304 (Educational Psychology), 
341 (Materials and Methods of Teaching English in High School), 
381 (Methods of Teaching in Secondary Schools), 421 (The School 
and Society), 500 (History of Education); English 305 (Introduc- 
tion to Poetry), 320 (American Literature), 321 (Southern Litera- 
ture), 343 (Contemporary Drama), 375 a-b-c (The Novel), 340 a-b-c 
(Shakespeare); Speech 1 (Essentials of Public Speaking) and 
Speech 340 (Argumentation); History 379-380 (Intioduction to the 
Study of Contemporary International Relations), 405 (The Genesis 
of the Constitution), 406 (State Government), 451 (The American 
Colonies, The Revolution, and Union to 1789), 452 (The United 
States from Washington to Reconstruction), 453 (The United States 
since Reconstruction), 454 (The Civil War), 455 (The Reconstruc- 
tion Period), 456 (Recent American History), 457 (The Ante-Bel- 
lum South), 459 (History of Georgia), 475 (Modern Britain, 1689- 
1940), 481 (Political Science), 482 (American Government and 
Politics); Home Economics 5 (Foods), 20 and 321 (Clothing), 22 
(Textiles), 375 (Home Planning and Furnishing), 490 (Develop- 
ment of the Young Child), 393 (Family Relations); Philosophy 304 
(Introduction to Philosophy), 305 (Modern Ethics), 352 (Moral 
Philosophy and The New Testament), 3 57 (History of Philosophy), 
358 (Modern Logic); Psychology 1 (Principles of Psychology), 22 
(Experimental Psychology), 323 (Abnormal Psychology), 373 (So- 
cial Psychology); Sociology 5 (Introductory Sociology) or 307 
(Elementary Principles of Sociology), 360 (ContenjDorary Social 
Problems), 361 (The Family). 



116 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



THE SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 

The School of Home Economics offers courses in the Coordinate 
College and in the Senior Division of the University. 

Throughout the four years certain courses related to home- 
making are required of all students. In addition, the Senior Di- 
vision offers opportunity for intensive study as preparation for vo- 
cations in the fields of (1) Teaching; (2) Institutional Management; 
(3) Home Demonstration Work; (4) Textiles and Clothing; and 
(5) General Home Economics. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS 

JUNIOR DIVISION REQUIREMENTS 

Freshman Sophomore 

Hours Hours 

Social Science 1 a-b-c ... . 9 Social Science 4 5 

Human Biology 1-2 10 Humanities 1 a-b-c 9 

English 2 a-b-c 9 Psychology 1 or Speech 8 5 

Art 30 5 Chemistry 21-22 10 

*Home Economics 1 5 Chemistry 346 5 

Home Economics 20 5 Home Economcis 5 5 

Physics 20 5 Home Economics 22 3 

Physical Education 1 5 Electives 6 

Physical Education 2 5 

53 53 

Upon completion of Junior Division requirements students must, 
with the approval of the head of the School, set up a program in- 
cluding prescribed courses in the major concentration and related 
electives. This may conform to any of the plans indicated. 

Students transferring from other institutions should enter not 
later than the beginning of the junior year and should understand 
that in most cases conflicts in schedule will prevent their taking 
both junior and senior technical courses in the same year. 

SENIOR DIVISION REQUIREMENTS 

Major Concentration: A minimum of 40 hours Senior Division 
work in home economics to meet requirements of the curriculum se- 
lected. 

Suggested Electives: Physics, Chemistry, Bacteriology, Biology, 
Psychology, Sociology, Economics, Health and Physical Education, 
Household Mechanics, Art, Landscape Architecture, Journalism, Public 
Speaking. 



* Not required of students entering with one or more years of ad- 
vanced standing. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



117 



PROGRAMS IN MAJOR CONCENTRATION 
1. VOCATIONAL HOME ECONOMICS TEACHING 



JUNIOR 

Hours 

Education 421 or 504 5 

Education 304 5 

Education 396 5 

Home Economics 306 5 

Home Economics 321 5 

Home Economics 351 5 

Home Economics 375 5 

Bacteriology 350 5 

Elective _. 5 



Senior 



Education 397 „ _ 


Hours 
5 


Education 346-47 - 

Home Economics 368-369.. 
Home Economics 490 


„10 

6 

„ . 5 


Home Economics 350 


5 


Home Economics 393 _ 


5 


Electives 


9 



45 



2. INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT 



Hours Senior 



Junior 

Home Economics 306 

Home Economics 352-353 

Home Economics 371 

Home Economics 446 or 

Chemistry 351 

Commerce 6 

Bacteriology 350 

Electives 



343. 



5 Home Economics 354 

8 Home Economics 355 

3 Home Economics 372 

5 Home Economics 490 or 393 

5 Home Economics 453 

5 Economics 5 

5 Education 

9 Electives 



45 



Hours 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

10 



45 
HOME DEMONSTRATION 



45 



Junior 



Home Economics 321 

Home Economics 351 

Home Economics 306 

Home Economics 350 

Home Economics 362 

Agriculture 10 

Bacteriology 350 5 

Elective 5 



Hours 

5 

_ 5 

5 

5 

5 



Senior 

Hours 

Home Economics 490 5 

Home Economics 393 5 

Home Economics 368-369.. 6 

Home Economics 375 5 

Education 5 

Agriculture 10 

Electives 9 



45 



4. TEXTILES AND CLOTHING 



Junior 

Hours 

Home Economics 321 5 

Home Economics 363 5 

Home Economics elective 5 

Economics 5 5 

Bacteriology 350 5 



45 



Art 

Electives 



Senior 

Hours 

Home Economics 364 5 

Home Economics 463 5 

Home Economics 461 5 

Home Economics elective 5 

Home Economics 490 5 



.10 Art 

.10 Electives 



.10 
.10 



45 
Art courses to be approved by major professor. 



45 



118 



THE UNIVERSITY OP GEORGIA 



5. GENERAL HOME ECONOMICS 



Junior 

Hours 

Home Economics 321 5 

Home Economics 306 _ _ 5 

Home Economics 375 5 

Home Economics elective 5 

Electives 20 



Senior 

Hours 

Home Economics 368-369 6 

Home Economics 490 5 

Home Economics 393 5 

Home Economics 351 5 

Electives 24 



45 



45 



GEORGE FOSTER PEABODY SCHOOL OF 
FORESTRY 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN FORESTRY 

The outstanding school of forestry of the entire Southeast is that 
of The University of Georgia. Established in 1906 through gifts of 
the late George Poster Peabody it was transferred to the State College 
of Agriculture two years later. The School was reestablished as a 
part of the University in 1935 and is fully recognized by the Society 
of American Foresters. 



JUNIOR DIVISION REQUIREMENTS 



Freshman 

Hours 

English 2 a, b, c 9 

Social Science 1 a, b, c 9 

Botany 21-22 (General Botany). .10 
Forestry 21 a-b-c (Field of For- 
estry) 3 

Ag. Engineering 6 (Topograph- 
ic Drawing) 3 

Math. 4 (Algebra) 5 

Math. 30 (Trigonometry) 5 

Military Science 1 5 

Speech 50 5 

Total .54 



Sophomore 

Hours 

Chemistry 21-24 (Inorganic) 10 

Agronomy 7 (Forest Soils) 5 

Econ. 5 or Ag. Econ. 3 5 

Geology 20 5 

Jour. 368 or English 6 „ 5 

Ag. Eng. 11 (Surveying) 5 

Plant Pathology 354 (Forest 

Pathology) 6 

Forestry 82 (Dendrology) 6 

Military Science 2 5 



Total .52 



SUMMER CAMP 

Hours 

Forestry 25 (Field Dendrology) _ _ 3 

Forestry 26 (Forest Surveying) _. 9 

Forestry 27 (Mapping and Cruising) 3 

Forestry 28 (Forest Improvements) 3 



Total 



IS 



The work given at Summer Camp covers a period of ten weeks and 
is a continuation of the Sophomore year at the University. It is pre- 
requisite to Senior Division courses. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 119 

SENIOR DIVISION REQUIREMENTS 

Junior 

Hours 

Forestry 308 (Protection) __ — 5 

Forestry 351 (Mensuration) _ ~ 5 

Forestry 356 a, b, c (Silviculture) .15 

Forestry 373 (Wood Anatomy and Tree Identification) 6 

Zoology 375 (Forest Entomology) __ 5 

*Electives - 10 or 12 

Total -46 or 48 

Senior 

Hours 

Forestry 352 (Mensuration) _ _ 5 

Forestry 376 (Utilization) 6 

Forestry 390 (Forest Finance) _ _ 3 

Forestry 391 (Forest Economics) 3 

Forestry 401 (Management) .__ 5 

Forestry 402 (Management Field Work) _._ 9 

Forestry 404 (Improvements) 3 

Forestry 405 (Naval Stores) 3 

Forestry 406 (Utilization Field Work) 3 

Forestry 410 (Policy) 3 

*Electives 3 

Total _ 46 



* Students who do not have a satisfactory high school course in 
Physics must choose Physics 20 as one of their electives. All electives 
are subject to the approval of the Dean of the School of Forestry. 
Students from junior colleges will have to fulfill the requirements for 
the Forestry degree except that they may substitute advanced courses 
in English for Journalism, and General Biology for Botany. 



COURSES OP INSTRUCTION 

The statement as to number of hours after each course title refers 
to the number of quarter hours credit for the course. Where not 
otherwise specified this indicates also the number of hours the class 
meets each week and all of these meetings are either recitation or 
lecture. 

The University reserves the right to eliminate any undergraduate 
course for which the registration is less than five students. 

Campus I refers to Franklin Campus or the main University 
campus, Campus II is the College of Agriculture campus and Cam- 
pus III is the Coordinate College. 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

JUNIOR DIVISION COURSES 

3 a-b. Farm Shop. 6 hours. Four 3-hour laboratory periods only. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 24. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. 
Campus II. Mr. Peikert. 

Farm Construction methods; farm carpentry; concrete; soldering; 
babbitting; blacksmithing; pipe fitting; and repair of farm machinery. 

4 a-b. Engineering Drawing. 6 hours. Three double laboratory 
periods only for Fall and Winter Quarters. Campus II. Mr. Hudson. 

Use of drawing instruments. Practice in lettering and detailing. 
Orthographic and pictorial methods of presentation. 

6. Topographic Drawing. 3 hours. Three double laboratory periods 
only. Winter and Spring Quarters. Campus II. Mr. Hudson. 

Free hand lettering and use of instruments. Principles of projection, 
sketching and preparation of topographic maps. 

8. Descriptive Geometry. 3 hours. Three double laboratory periods 
only. Prerequisite: Agricultural Engineering 4 a-b. Spring Quarter. 
Campus II. Mr. Hudson. 

Representation of geometrical magnitudes by means of points, lines, 
planes, and solids and their application in the solution of problems. 

11. Surveying. 5 hours. Three double laboratory periods. Prere- 
quisite: Trigonometry. Fall and Spring Quarters. Campus II. Mr. 
Banner. 

The use, care and adjustment of surveying instruments and equip- 
ment. Field problems in leveling, land measuring and topographic 
surveying. 

20. Soil and Water Conservation. 3 hours. One double laboratory 
period. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Campus II. Mr. Hudson. 

Principles and methods of improving productive land by drainage, 
irrigation, and soil erosion control. Primarily for B.S.A. students. 



[ 120 ] 



GENERAL INFORMATION 121 

22. Soil and Watee Conservation. 3 hours. One double laboratory 
period. Prerequisite: Surveying. Spring Quarter. Campus II. Mr. 
Banner. 

Principles and methods of improving productive land by drainage, 
irrigation, and soil erosion control. Primarily for B.S.A.E. students. 

60. Farm Power and Machinery. 3 hours. One double laboratory 
period. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Campus II. Mr. Peikert. 

A general course in the operation, care and repair of farm imple- 
ments, tractors, and stationary power units commonly used on farms. 
General machine shop practices. 

70. Farm Buildings and Equipment. 3 hours. Fall, Winter, and 
Spring Quarters. Campus II. Mr. Briftmier and Mr. Banner. 

A study of farm buildings and equipment with special application 
to Georgia conditions. 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

350. Mechanics. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Physics 27. Fall Quarter. 
Campus II. Mr. Bavenport. 

The statics of engineering. 

351. Mechanics. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Agricultural Engineering 
350. Winter Quarter. Campus II. Mr. Bavenport. 

The dynamics of engineering. 

353. Materials of Construction. 5 hours. One double laboratory 
period. Prerequisite: Chemistry 24. Winter Quarter. Campus II. 
Mr. Lanham. 

Manufacture, properties, uses and applications of materials for en- 
gineering construction. 

354. Mechanism. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Trigonometry. Winter 
Quarter. Campus II. Mr. Briftmier. 

Study of mechanism with reference to the transmission of motion 
and force and to their forms and arrangements in actual machines. 

355. Strength of Materials. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Agricultural 
Engineering 351. Spring Quarter. Campus II. Mr. Bavenport. 

Elements of stress analysis, resistance, and design as applied to 
engineering materials and structures. 

356. Hydraulics. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Calculus. Spring Quarter. 
Campus II. Mr. Bavenport. 

A general course in hydraulics, including fundamental principles 
of hydrostatics and hydrodynamics applied to the flow of water through 
orifices, over weirs, through pipes and channels. 

361. Farm Machinery. 5 hours. Two double laboratory periods. 
Prerequisite: Physics 27. Fall Quarter. Campus II. Mr. Peikert. 

Development, design, and utilization of farm machinery for all 
forms of farm power. 



122 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

362. Farm Motors. 5 hours. Two double laboratory periods. Pre- 
requisite: Agricultural Engineering 370. Winter Quarter. Campus II. 
Mr. Peikert. 

Principles of construction, operation, adjustment and application 
of tractors, trucks, and gasoline and oil engines for agricultural uses. 

370. Heat Engineering. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Calculus and 
Physics 28. Fall Quarter. Campus II. Mr. Davenport. 

Fundamental principles of engineering thermodynamics, heating, 
ventilation and refrigeration. 

371. Farm Structures. 5 hours. Three double laboratory periods. 
Prerequisite: Agricultural Engineering 353 and 355. Fall Quarter. 
Campus II. Mr. Lanham. 

Design of farm buildings; details of construction; specifications; 
bills of material, and cost estimates. 

372. Farm Sanitation and Water Supply. 3 hours. Prerequisite: 
Agricultural Engineering 356. Fall Quarter. Campus II. Mr. Drift- 
mier. 

The development, storage, distribution and purification of rural water 
supplies, and the collection and disposal of farm and rural wastes. 

374. Household Engineering. 5 hours. One double laboratory 
period. Offered in alternate years. Spring Quarter. Campus II. Mr. 
Driftmier. 

Fundamental principles, application and maintenance of electrical 
household equipment; home conveniences; water supply and sanita- 
tion; lighting, heating and ventilation. Study of kitchens in relations 
to planning and equipment. 

384. Direct Current Machinery. 3 hours. One double laboratory 
period. Prerequisite: Physics 29. Fall Quarter. Campus II. Mr. 
Davenport. 

A study of the laws and phenomena of electricity and its application 
to electric motors, electric generators, transformers, distribution and 
utilization, with special emphasis to its use in agricultural pursuits. 

385. Principles of Landscape Construction. 5 hours. One double 
laboratory period. Offered in alternate years. Fall Quarter. Campus 
II. Mr. Lanham. 

Development and design of roads, streets, and walks; municipal 
water supply and sewage practice; problems in landscape construction, 
including grading, drainage, and utility plans; estimates, cost data, 
contracts and specifications. 

386. Alternating Current Machinery. 5 hours. One double labora- 
tory period. Prerequisite: Agricultural Engineering 384. Winter 
Quarter. Campus II. Mr. Davenport. 

Principles of design, construction and operation of alternating cur- 
rent machines with special emphasis to their use in agricultural pur- 
suits. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 123^ 

388. Rural Electrification. 3 hours. One double laboratory period. 
Prerequisite: Agricultural Engineering 386. Winter Quarter. Campus 
II. Mr. Greiner. 

A study of the problems involved in the distribution and application 
of electricity to the farm. 

390. Engineering Bibliographic Research. 5 hours. Prerequisite: 
English Composition. Spring Quarter. Campus II. Mr. Lanham. 

The analysis and treatment of technical and scientific papers and 
reports with particular reference to their application in the engineer- 
ing profession. 

SENIOR DIVISION OR GRADUATE COURSES 

401 (Sr.) 601 (Gr.). Agricultural Engineering Applications. 5 
hours. Two double laboratory periods. Offered when demand war- 
rants. Campus II. Mr. Peikert. 

Advanced work in the study of agricultural production methods, 
farm construction, sanitation and land utilization, and the application 
of engineering methods. 

404 (Sr.) 604 (Gr.). Advanced Rural Electrification. 3 hours. 
One double laboratory period. Prerequisite: Agricultural Engineer- 
ing 388. Spring Quarter. Campus II. Mr. Davenport and Mr. Greiner. 

An advanced course in the application of electric power to farm 
development and to the processing of farm products. 

405 (Sr.) 605 (Gr.). Structural Design. 3 hours. Two double lab- 
oratory periods. Prerequisite: Agricultural Engineering 355 and 371. 
Winter Quarter. Campus II. Mr. Driftmier. 

Structural theory and design of wood, masonry, concrete, and steel 
construction. 

406 (Sr.) 606 (Gr.). Machine Design. 3 hours. One double lab- 
oratory period. Prerequisite: Agricultural Engineering 353, 361 and 
362. Spring Quarter. Campus II. Mr. Peikert. 

An advanced course in the analysis and design of agricultural im- 
plements and power units. 

407 (Sr.) 607 (Gr.). Design of Hydraulic Structures. 3 hours. 
One double laboratory period. Prerequisite: Agricultural Engineering 
22 and 356. Winter Quarter. Campus II. Mr. Banner. 

The study and design of erosion control structures. 

Master of Science in Agricultural Engineering. Prerequisite: De- 
gree of Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering. The major 
must be in Agricultural Engineering. One minor must be in the Col- 
lege of Agriculture. Minors must be chosen with distinct reference 
to the major and the whole program must have the approval of the 
head of the Department of Agricultural Engineering. 

A minimum of ten quarter hours constitutes a minor and twenty 



124 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

quarter hours a major. Not less than 45 quarter hours required for 
the M.S.A.E. degree. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

804. Special Electrical Problems. 5 hours. Formation and solu- 
tion of theoretical and practical problems connected with electrical 
circuits, apparatus, machines or systems. Prerequisite: Agricultural 
Engineering 388 or equivalent. Campus II. Mr. Davenport and Mr. 
Greiner. 

805. Farm Structures. 5 hours. Problems in farm structures, 
water supply, sanitation, heating, lighting, ventilation, and home 
equipment. Prerequisites: Agricultural Engineering 371 and 372, or 
equivalent. Campus II. Mr. Driftmier and Mr. Lanham. 

806. Farm Power and Machinery. 5 hours. Problems in design, 
testing and determining efficiency of farm implements and machines; 
power problems in application, efficiency and economy. Prerequisites: 
Agricultural Engineering 361 and 362, or equivalent. Campus II. Mr. 
Peikert. 

807. Soil and Water Conservation. 5 hours. Studies of water con- 
trol through drainage; the conservation of soils by the control of soil 
erosion; land clearing. Prerequisites: Agricultural Engineering 22 
and 356, or equivalent. Campus II. Mr. Banner and Mr. Hudson. 

808. Agricultural Engineering Research. 20 hours. Original in- 
vestigation of an approved problem in some phase of agricultural en- 
gineering; farm power and machinery; rural electrification; farm 
structures, including water supply and sanitation; or soil and water 
conservation. Agricultural Engineering Staff. 

812. Thesis. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Agricultural Engineering 808. 
Campus II. Agricultural Engineering Staff. 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AND RURAL SOCIOLOGY 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

JUNIOR DIVISION COUKSES 

3. Agricultural Economics. 5 hours. Five lectures or recitations 
per week. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Campus II. Mr. Firor, 
Mr. Young, and Mr. King. 

Orientation course in economics of agriculture. The purposes of 
this course are to give the student an understanding of the place of 
economics in agriculture and to develop methods for using economic 
facts and principles in solving farm problems. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 125 



SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

301. Farm Organization and Management. 5 hours. Two lectures 
and three double laboratory periods per week. Fall and Winter Quar- 
ters. Prerequisite: Agricultural Economics 3. Campus II. Mr. King. 

A scientific approach to the study of individual farm programs for 
the purpose of determining methods to be used for increasing farm 
income. 

304. Marketing Farm Products. 5 hours. Five lectures or recita- 
tions per week. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Prerequisite: 
Agricultural Economics 3. Campus II. Mr. Firor. 

This is a course in marketing functions and principles applied to 
farm products. The purpose of this course is to enable a student to 
understand the relationship between marketing practices and other 
agricultural activities. 

351. Agricultural Credit. 5 hours. Five lectures or recitations 
per week. Winter Quarter. Prerequisite: Agricultural Economics 3. 
Campus II. Mr. Firor or Mr. Young. 

A discussion of the principles of finance in their application to farm 
credit organizations and practices. 

363. Marketing Agencies in Agriculture. 5 hours. Five lectures or 
recitations per week. Winter Quarter. Prerequisite: Agricultural 
Economics 3. Campus II. Mr. Firor. 

Marketing problems, functions of integrated and nonintegrated 
marketing organizations, and marketing agreements in agriculture. 

364. Land Economics. 5 hours. Three lectures and two double lab- 
oratory periods per week. Spring Quarter. Prerequisite: Agricultural 
Economics 3. Campus I. Mr. Firor. 

An appraisal of the agricultural use of land in the United States with 
special attention to Georgia and the counties of the students. This 
course is designed to meet the current need of agricultural workers 
for training in the application of economics to the use of land by 
farmers under changing political and social conditions. 

SENIOR DIVISION OR GRADUATE COURSES 

402 (Sr.) 602 (Gr.). Advanced Farm Organization and Manage- 
Five lectures or recitations per week. Winter and Spring Quarters. 
Prerequisite: Agricultural Economics 301. Campus II. Mr. King. 

Continuation of Agricultural Economics 301 with special exercises 
in appraising and analyzing economic facts of individual farms and 
making adjustments in the use of land, labor, and capital with chang- 
ing farm programs. 

458 (Sr.) 658 (Gr.). Advanced Economics of Agriculture. 5 hours. 
Five lectures or recitations per week. Winter and Spring Quarters. 
Prerequisite: Agricultural Economics 3. Campus II. Mr. Young. 

Causes and effects of market surpluses, private and governmental 



126 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

control policies, and agricultural outlook. A study of the application 
of economic theories and principles to agricultural activities. 

467 (St.) 667 (Gr.). Agricultural Prices. 5 hours. Five lectures 
or recitations per week. Spring Quarter. Prerequisite: Agricultural 
Economics 3. Campus II. Mr. King. 

Preparation and use of index numbers and other means for analyz- 
ing the behavior of farm prices, price theories applied to agriculture, 
farm price forecasting, and outlook. 

468 (Sr.) 668 (Gr.). Current Agricultural Problems. 5 hours. Five 
lectures or recitations per week. Fall Quarter. Prerequisite: Agri- 
cultural Economics 3. Campus II. Mr. Firor. 

A study of current agricultural problems, factors creating current 
agricultural situations, and methods of analyzing current situations 
and solving current farm problems. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

808. Advanced Agricultural Economics. 5 hours. Five lectures per 
week. Time to be arranged. Prerequisite: Agricultural Economics 
458. Campus II. Mr. Firor or Mr. Young. 

This course is designed to give the student an opportunity to re- 
view economics theories and agricultural programs for the purpose 
of analyzing specific problems in agriculture. 

815. Advanced Farm Management. 5 hours. Five double labora- 
tory periods per week. Time to be arranged. Prerequisites: Agricul- 
tural Economics 402 and 364. Campus II. Mr. King. 

Research in farm management. The student will be required to 
assemble, appraise, analyze, and make deductions from economic data 
of individual farms. 

820. Advanced Farm Records. 5 hours. Five double laboratory 
periods per week. Time to be arranged. Prerequisite: Agricultural 
Economics 301. Campus II. Mr. King. 

Methods and practices in keeping farm records with especial atten- 
tion to financial, feed, labor, and production records, and methods of 
determining livestock and crop production costs. 

821. Public Problems of Agriculture. 5 hours. Five double lab- 
oratory periods per week. Time to be arranged. Prerequisites: Agri- 
cultural Economics 301 and 468. Campus II. Mr. Firor. 

A group discussion of agricultural problems that involve govern- 
mental activities. 

822. Distribution of Farm Productions. 5 hours. Five double lab- 
oratory periods per week. Time to be arranged. Prerequisites: Agri- 
cultural Economics 304, 363, and 458. Campus II. Mr. Firor. 

A study of the economics of distribution of farm products from the 
viewpoint of functional organization and activities. 

823. Consumption Economics of Marketing Farm Products. 5 hours. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 127 

Five lectures per week. Time to be arranged. Prerequisites: Agri- 
cultural Economics 304, 363, and 458. Campus II. Mr. Firor. 

The marketing of farm products in relation to consumption, prices, 
purchasing power, and consumers' attitudes. 

RURAL SOCIOLOGY 

JUNIOR DIVISION COURSES 

310. Rural Sociology. 5 hours. Five lectures per week. Fall and 
Winter Quarters. Campus II. Mr. Young. 

A descriptive course of rural social organizations and a study of 
the principles of rural sociology applied to rural life. 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

400 (Sr.) 600 (Gr.). Cooperation eh Agriculture. 5 hours. Five 
lectures per week. Fall Quarter. Prerequisites: Agricultural Eco- 
nomics 3 and 304. Campus II. Mr. Young. 

A study of cooperative marketing associations; their organization 
and practices. A discussion of philosophy of cooperation in agricul- 
ture. 

401 (Sr.) 601 (Gr.). Rural Community Organization. 5 hours. Five 
lectures per week. Spring Quarter. Prerequisite: Rural Sociology 
310. Campus II. Mr. Young. 

A study of the historical development of the organization of rural 
communities; the concept of community organization as a tool for 
guiding social change; the psychology of rural groups; methods of 
making organizations effective through developing rural leadership, 
analyzing community needs, building community programs, and co- 
ordinating programs. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

807. Research in Rural Social Organizations. 5 hours. Five 
double laboratory periods per week. Time to be arranged. Prere- 
quisites: Rural Sociology 310, 400, and 401. Campus II. Mr. Young. 

To give a first hand knowledge of Georgia rural conditions, and to 
train for field work. Gathering, tabulating, studying, and interpeting 
data and writing reports. Graduate students may use the reports 
of their investigations in connection with their theses. 

809. Rural Social-Economic Problems. 5 hours. Five double lab- 
oratory periods per week. Time to be arranged. Prerequisites: Agri- 
cultural Economics 3, and courses selected by instructor. Campus II. 
Mr. Young. 

A study of the social approach of selected farm management, mar- 
keting, price, tenure, and credit problems. 



128 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

AGRONOMY 

JUNIOR DIVISION COURSES 

1. Field Crop Production. 5 hours. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quar- 
ters. Prerequisite: A general course in Botany. Campus II. Mr. 
James. 

A study of the adaptation, culture, improvement, harvesting and 
uses of the more important crops, with special reference to the major 
crops of Georgia. Laboratory exercises will include seed studies, intro- 
duction to commercial grading of grain, hay, cotton, tobacco, and the 
identification, adaptation and use of important legumes and grasses. 

7. Forest Soils. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. Prerequisite: Chemistry 
21-24, Geology 20. Campus II. Mr. Collins or Mr. Garman. 

Covers a study of the origin, formation and classification of soils. 
The effect of climate on the physical and chemical properties of soils 
under forest growth. Soil mapping. 

10. Principles of Soil Management. 5 hours. Fall, Winter, and 
Spring Quarters. Prerequisite: Chemistry 21-24. Campus II. Mr. 
Collins or Mr. Garman. 

Covers formation, physical and chemical properties of soils, effects 
of commercial fertilizers; lime, organic matter, soil management prac- 
tices, soil fertility, maintenance, and use of soil survey. 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

300. Cotton Classing. 5 hours. Winter and Spring Quarters. Pre- 
requisite: Good eyesight and not color blind. Campus II. Mr. Murray. 

A study of cotton grades and staples according to Universal Stan- 
dards for American Upland Cotton for grade and staple. Practice will 
consist of classing and stapling approximately three thousand samples 
of Georgia cotton, along with other types produced in the United States. 

301. Advanced Cotton Classing. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Prere- 
quisite: Agronomy 300. Campus II. Mr. Murray. 

For men who expect to become specialists in cotton classing. A 

study of the Universal Standards of American Upland Cotton for 

grade and staple. Practice will consist of classing and stapling ap- 
proximately three thousand samples of cotton. 

302. Cotton Production. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Campus II. Mr. 
Murray. 

A study of history, production, adaptation, breeding, varieties, cul- 
tivation, harvesting, grading, and marketing of cotton. Laboratory ex- 
ercises will deal with United States and World Production and Con- 
sumption. Field experiments will be given special consideration. 

303. Cotton Improvement. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Prerequisite: 
Agronomy 1 and Genetics. Campus II. Mr. Murray. 

The fundamental principles of genetics applied to a study of cotton 
improvement. Methods of breeding, progeny records and plat tech- 
nique will be stressed. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 129 

304. Advanced Cotton Improvement. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. Pre- 
requisite: Agronomy 302 and Genetics. Campus II. Mr. Murray. 

This course is designed for students specializing in cotton. Litera- 
ture dealing with the inheritance of the important economic characters 
of the cotton plant will be studied. Special emphasis will be devoted 
to breeding methods, progeny records, biometry and fled plat technique. 

305. The Cotton Fiber. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. Prerequisite: 
Agronomy 300 and 302. Campus II. Mr. Murray. 

A study of the cotton fiber and its uses. Factors such as soils, 
climate, variety, ginning as affecting spinning quality are considered. 
Special consideration will be devoted to a study of the physical pro- 
perties of fibers. 

320. Advanced Crop Production. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. Prere- 
quisite: Agronomy 1. Campus II. Mr. Murray. 

An advanced study of the common field crops of Georgia. Labora- 
tory exercises will include a study of the identification of the im- 
portant legumes, grasses, and weeds of Georgia. Experiments from the 
Agronomy plats will be considered. 

321. Forage Crops. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Prerequisite: Agronomy 
1. Mr. Fain or Mr. James. 

Requirements and adaptations of forage crops. Special attention 
will be given to combinations that will purnish all year grazing under 
southern conditions. Laboratory exercises will deal with the botanical 
and morphological characteristics of the principal forage plants. Re- 
sults of forage crop investigations in the southern states will be con- 
sidered. 

322. Grain and Hay Grading. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Prerequisite: 
Agronomy 1. Campus 11. Mr. Murray. 

Advanced study and practice of grading grains and hay according 
to Federal Standards promulgated by the Bureau of Agricultural 
Economics, United States Department of Agriculture. 

323. Pasture Development. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. Prerequisite: 
Agronomy 321. Campus II. Mr. Fain or Mr. James. 

The principal factors and requirements of pastures will be studied. 
Methods of meeting these requirements under southern conditions, as 
well as a combination of plants, will be given special consideration. 

324. Pasture Management. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. Prerequisite: 
Agronomy 321 and 323. Campus II. Mr. Fain or Mr. James. 

Methods of grazing and fertilization in their relation to the growth 
and continuation of stand will be considered. The general care of 
the pasture in relation to growth, both of desirable and undesirable 
plants, will be given special study. 

351. Soil Formation. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. Prerequisite: 
Agronomy 10. Campus II. Mr. Collins. 

Covers rock disintegration, decomposition and geological agencies 
relating to the origin and formation of soils. 

353. Soil Classification and Soil Survey. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. 



130 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Prerequisite: Agronomy 10 and 351, or equivalent. Fee $10.00. Campus 
II. Mr. Collins. 

Practice in soil classification, survey and preparation of maps and 
reports. Soil mapping of provinces, series and types. 

355. Advanced Soil Management. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. Pre- 
requisite: Agronomy 10. Campus II. Mr. Collins or Mr. Garman. 

Covers the occurrence and properties of predominant soils and prac- 
tices, and management to maintain fertility, prevent erosion, and in- 
crease crop production. 

356. Fertilizers. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Prerequisite: Agronomy 

10. Campus II. Mr. Collins. 

Covers source and use of fertilizer materials, soil conditions affect- 
ing use of fertilizers, and study of experimental data. 

357. Farm Manures. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. Prerequisite: Agron- 
omy 10. Campus II. Mr. Collins or Mr. Garman. 

Covers studies of the production, composition, care and handling 
of barnyard manures, artificial manures and green manures, with par- 
ticular emphasis on the use of cover and strip crops used in the 
erosion control practices as a source of green manures for soil main- 
tenance and improvement. 

380. Tobacco Production. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. Prerequisite: 
Agronomy 1 and 10. Campus II. Mr. Murray. 

This course will consist of a study of the history, production, cul- 
ture, classes and types of tobacco produced in the United States, with 
special reference to flue-cured tobacco. Laboratory exercises will con- 
sist of grading, based on the Federal system, utilization, and research 
findings from the southern agricultural experiment stations. 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

400-401 (Sr.) 600-601 (Gr.). Advanced Cotton Production. 5 hours 
each. By arrangement. Prerequisite: Agronomy 302. Campus II. Mr. 
Murray. 

An advanced study of the problems of cotton production in the 
United States and foreign countries. 

402-403 (Sr.) 602-603 (Gr.). Cotton Production Problems. 5 hours 
each. By arrangement. Prerequisite: Agronomy 400-600. Campus 

11. Mr. Murray. 

This course is designed for students majoring in cotton and will 
consist of a problem, conferences, and assigned readings. 

420 (Sr.) 620 (Gr.). Advanced Forage Crops. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. 
Prerequisite: Agronomy 321. Campus II. Mr. James or Mr. Murray. 

A further study of forage crop possibilities of the State, particularly 
with reference to legumes. 

421 (Sr.) 621 (Gr.). Crop Adaptation. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. 
Prerequisite: Agronomy 320 and 321, or 302. Campus II. Mr. Murray 
or Mr. James. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 131 

A study of crop adaptation in the United States with special reference 
to the conditions and relationship to conditions in Georgia and plant 
requirements for meeting this condition. 

422 (Sr.) 622 (Gr.). World Crop Production. 5 hours. Spring Quar- 
ter. Prerequisite: Agronomy 320 and 321, or 302. Campus II. Mr. 
Fain, Mr. Murray or Mr. James. 

A study of the distribution of crop production and world possibil- 
ities, special attention being given to the reason for producing a par- 
ticular crop in a given section. 

458 (Sr.) 658 (Gr.). Land Classification, Land Zoning and Land Use 
Problems. 5 hours. Fall and Spring Quarters. Prerequisite: Agron- 
omy 10. Mr. Collins or Mr. Garman. 

This course is designed to train prospective teachers in agriculture, 
county agents, and foresters in the fundamentals of classifying, zon- 
ing, mapping land, working out land use problems on individual farms, 
communities and counties, and adjusting land use practices. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

850-851. Fertilizers. 10 hours. Prerequisites: Agronomy 10, 351, 
and 356, or equivalent. Campus II. Mr. Collins or Mr. Garman. 

This course will consist of the study of the manufacture and use 
of commercial fertilizers, the principles involved in the application of 
fertilizers to crops and the study of experimental methods for determin- 
ing values of fertilizer materials to plant growth. Specific problems 
will be studied in the greenhouse and field. 

852-853. Sotl Fertility. 10 hours. Prerequisites: Agronomy 10, 
351, and 356, or equivalent. Campus II. Mr. Collins or Mr. Garman. 

The work of this course will consist of the study of crop require- 
ments and the investigation of some problem definitely related to 
plant growth. Conferences, parallel readings and laboratory work 
will be required. 

854-855. Soil Types. 10 hours. Prerequisites: Agronomy 10, 351, and 
353, or equivalent. Campus II. Mr. Collins. 

a. A general study of the origin and formation of the soils of a 
given area. 

b. Examination and investigation and classification of the soil series 
and types in the field. This course will consist of conferences, as- 
signed readings, and field work. 

856-857. Soil Types of North Georgia. 10 hours. Prerequisites: 
Agronomy 10, 351, and 353, or equivalent. Campus II. Mr. Collins. 

A study of the origin, formation, and classification of the soils of 
North Georgia. The course will consist of conferences, assigned read- 
ings, field investigations, and mapping of the soils. 

858-859. Soil Types of South Georgia. 10 hours. Prerequisites: 
Agronomy 10, 351, and 353, or equivalent. Campus II. Mr. Collins. 
A study of the origin, formation, and classification of the soils of 



132 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

South Georgia. The course will consist of conferences, assigned read- 
ings, field investigations, and mapping of the soils. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

JUNIOR DIVISION COURSES 

3. Farm Animal Production. 5 hours. Fall, Winter, and Spring 
Quarters. Campus II. Mr. Jarnagin, Mr. Rice, and Mr. Ward. 

An introductory course in animal husbandry with emphasis given 
to the importance of the problems pertaining to the production of farm 
animals in a well balanced agricultural program. 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

371. Livestock Production. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. Prerequisite: 
Animal Husbandry 3. Campus II. Mr. Rice. 

A practical study of the fundamental principles involved in the 
profitable production of the various classes of farm animals. 

372. Animal Breeding. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. Campus II. Mr. 
Rice. 

A study of the principles of genetics with special applications to the 
breeding of farm animals. 

373. Feeds and Feeding. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Campus II. Mr. 
Rice. 

A general introductory course in the feeding of all classes of farm 
animals. 

374. Animal Nutrition. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. Prerequisite: 
Animal Husbandry 373. Campus II. Mr. Jarnagin. 

An advanced course dealing with feeding the different classes of 
farm animals. 

375. Livestock Marketing. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. Campus II. 
Mr. Jarnagin. 

A study of the various methods used in selling all classes of farm 
animals. 

376. Advanced Stock Judging. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. Prere- 
quisite: Animal Husbandry 3. Campus II. Mr. Rice. 

A course specially designed for students majoring in animal hus- 
bandry. 

377. Farm Meats. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. Campus II. Mr. Rice. 
A practical course dealing with slaughtering, processing, and curing 

farm meat. 

378. Comparative Anatomy. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Campus II. 
Mr. Jones. 

A study of the anatomy of! farm animals in its relation to function, 
adaptation, and soundness. 



GENERAL INFORMATION m 

379. Comparative Physiology. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. Campus 
II. Mr. Jones. 

A study of fundamental principles involved in the prevention of 
losses caused by parasites affecting farm animals. 

381. Parasitology. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. Campus. II. Mr. 
Jones. 

382. Common Diseases of Farm Animals and Fowls. 5 hours. Fall 
and Spring Quarters. Campus II. Mr Jones. 

A detailed study of the common diseases affecting farm animals. 

383. Sex Hygiene and Reproduction of Cattle. 5 hours. Fall Quar- 
ter. Campus II. Mr. Jones. 

A detailed study of diseases affecting reproduction of cattle. 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 
SEXIOR DIVISION COURSES 

389. Dairy Bacteriology. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Prerequisite: 
Bacteriology 350. Campus II. Mr. Bennett. 

Determination of numbers of types of bacteria in dairy products 
and their significance; the use of microorganisms in the manufacture 
of dairy products. 

390. Dairy Cattle Improvement. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. Campus 
II. Mr. Ward. 

Various methods of improving dairy cattle, including principles of 
breeding, breed registry, selection of the sire, and type classification; 
also a study of pedigrees, production records, and dairy cattle judging. 

391. Farm Dairying. 5 hours. Fall and Spring Quarters. Campus 
II. Mr. Bennett. 

Composition and properties of milk. Method of manufacturing dairy 
products and improving their quality. 

392. Milk Production and Dairy Farm Management. 5 hours. Fall 
Quarter. Campus II. Mr. Jarnagin and Mr. Bennett. 

A study of the fundamental principles of feeding and managing 
dairy cattle. 

394. Market Milk. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. Prerequisite: Dairy 
Husbandry 391. Campus II. Mr. Bennett. 

Sanitary production and processing of milk supply, milk inspection 
systems, and marketing of milk. 

395. Dairy Plant Management. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. Prere- 
quisite: Dairy Husbandry 391. Campus II. Mr. Bennett. 

Fundamental principles of the management of creameries and other 
dairy manufacturing plants. 

396 a. Advanced Work in Testing Dairy Products. 5 hours. Spring 
Quarter. Prerequisite: Dairy Husbandry 391. Campus II. Mr. Ben- 
nett. 



134 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Various tests employed in dairy processing and manufacturing plants. 

396 b. Dairy Products Judging and Grading. 5 hours. Spring 
Quarter. Prerequisite: Dairy Husbandry 391. Campus II. Mr. Ben- 
nett. 

Scoring and grading of milk, butter, cheese and ice cream. 

397. Creamery Butter Making. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. Prere- 
quisite: Dairy Husbandry 391. Campus II. Mr. Bennett. 

Care of milk and cream. Separation of milk starters, cream ripen- 
ing, churning, and preparation of butter for market. 

398. Cheese Making. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. Prerequisite: Dairy 
Husbandry 391. Campus II. Mr. Bennett. 

Principles of cheese making, manufacture of cottage cheese, manu- 
facture, curing, and storing of Cheddar cheese. 

399. Ice Cream Making. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. Prerequisite: 
Dairy Husbandry 391. Campus II. Mr. Bennett. 

Care and preparation of ingredients; manufacture of plain and fancy 
ice cream and related products. 



ART 

JUNIOR DIVISION COURSES 
APPRECIATION 

17. Art Appreciation. 3 hours. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. 
Campuses I and III. Mr. Dodd and Mr. Gamorell. 

For the student who is not an art student but who wants better 
to understand and enjoy art. This course is especially designed to 
be taken with the three hour lecture course Listener's History of 
Music (Music 43) under Mr. Hodgson. 

30. Art Survey. 5 hours. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. 
Campuses II and III. Miss Ledford and Mr. Gamorell. 

A comprehensive approach to the field of art, providing a basis for 
the development of good taste and art appreciation. No particular 
talent is required for the completion of this course. Lectures, required 
reading, research, and problems in practical application of art prin- 
ciples. Required of art majors and majors in Home Economics and 
offered as a general elective. 

35. Fine Arts. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Hodgson 
and Mr. Dodd. 

(Not open to students who have had Art 17 and Music 43). 

DESIGN 

40. Elementary Design. 5 hours. Five laboratory periods per 
week. Winter Quarter. Campus III. 

An elementary study of the principles of design and their applica- 
tion to varied simple projects. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 135^ 

41. Design. 3 hours. Three laboratory periods. Winter Quarter. 
Campus III. 

A further study of design principles with emphasis on the use of 
natural forms as source material. 

DRAWING 

50. Drawing. 5 hours. Five laboratory periods. Spring Quarter. 
Campuses I and III. 

50 a. Drawing. 3 hours. Three laboratory periods. Fall Quarter. 
Campus I. 

50 b. Drawing. 3 hours. Three laboratory periods. Prerequisite: 
Art 50 a. Winter Quarter. Campus I. 

51. Drawing. 3 hours. Three laboratory periods. Spring Quarter. 
Campuses I and III. 

HISTORY AND APPRECIATION 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

281. History of Art. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Miss 
Ledford. 

A historical survey of the development of art from pre-historic times 
to the Italian Renaissance. Illustrated lectures. 

282. History of Renaissance Art. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. Cam- 
pus I. Miss Holliday. 

A study of Art from the Italian Renaissance to the middle of the 
nineteenth century. Study of the great masterpieces in painting, 
sculpture, and architecture in relation to their social and historical 
background. Illustrated lectures. 

283. History of Modern Art. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. Campus I. 
Miss Holliday. 

This course deals with the most important movements in art since 
the middle of the nineteenth century and includes a survey of con- 
temporary art. Illustrated lectures. 

SENIOR DIVISION OR GRADUATE COURSES 

435 (Sr.) 635 (Gr.). Art Structure. 5 hours. No prerequisite. 
Spring Quarter. Campus I. 

Study of theory of art, designed for art majors as well as a general 
elective for advanced students of other departments. 



136 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

DRAWING AND COMPOSITION 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

221. Drawing and Composition. 5 hours. Five laboratory periods. 
Fall and Spring Quarters. Campus I. 

Drawing from the human figure. Study of anatomy as an aid in 
understanding the figure. Figure and landscape composition. 

222. Drawing and Composition. 5 hours. Five laboratory periods. 
Prerequisite: Art 221. Winter Quarter. Campus I. 

Continuation of Art 221. Analysis of composition. 

223. Drawing and Composition. 5 hours. Five laboratory periods. 
Prerequisite: Art 221. Spring Quarter. Campus I. 

Continuation of Art 222. 

202. Drawing and Composition. 5 hours. Five laboratory periods. 
Prerequisites: Art 211 and 223. Campus I. 

Advanced problems in composition and figure drawing. Variety of 
media. Analysis of masterpieces, outside sketching. 

PAINTING 

231. Painting. 5 hours. Five laboratory periods. Prerequisite: 
Art 221. Spring Quarter. Campus I. 

Portrait and figure painting. Landscape and still life. Demon- 
strations. 

232. Painting. 5 hours. Five laboratory periods. Prerequisite: 
Art 231. Fall Quarter. Campus I. 

Continuation of 231. 

233. Painting. 5 hours. Five laboratory periods. Prerequisite: 
Art 232. Winter Quarter. Campus I. 

Advanced painting. Experiments in various media and research. 

234. Painting. 5 hours. Five laboratory periods. Prerequisite: 
Art 233. Spring Quarter. Campus I. 

Continuation of 233. 

241. Water Color. 5 hours. Five laboratory periods. Prerequisite: 
Art 221. Fall and Spring Quarters. Campus I. 

Problems in still life, landscape and figure composition are assigned 
to help the student discover his individual method of expression in 
water color. 

242. Water Color. 5 hours. Five laboratory periods. Prerequisite: 
Art 241. Campus I. 

Continuation of 241. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 137 



DESIGN 

211. Design. 5 hours. Five laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Art 

40. Fall Quarter. Campus I. 

Application of the principles of design to the decorative arts and 
crafts. Assigned problems with special emphasis on the development 
of creative ability and individuality. 

212. Advanced Design. 5 hours. Five laboratory periods. Prere- 
quisite: Art 211. Fall Quarter. Campus I. 

Continuation of 211 with more advanced problems in creative de- 
sign (assigned problems with individual criticism). 

213. Advanced and Applied Design. 5 hours. Five laboratory periods. 
Prerequisites: Art 211 and 221. Winter Quarter. Campus I. 

Continuation of 212. Advanced problems in creative design (or 
drawing) in relation to the commercial field with execution of the 
designs in the various materials and media. 

286. Historic Ornament. 5 hours. Two hours lecture; three lab- 
oratory periods. Spring Quarter. Campus I. 

A study of the origins and development of historic styles in orna- 
ment as related to architecture and the decorative arts. 

COMMERCIAL ART AND ILLUSTRATION 

207. Illustration. 5 hours. Five laboratory periods. Prerequisites: 
Art 221 and 211. Winter Quarter. Campus I. 

Practice in illustrative drawings. Instruction in layouts and the 
use of different media for reproduction. 

208. Advertising Art. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. Campus I. 

A study of the principles of art as applied to advertising. Layouts 
including newspaper and magazine advertisements, posters, and pack- 
age design. Types, lettering, and methods of reproduction. Lectures, 
class discussions with practical problems covering points discussed. 

209. Commercial Design. 5 hours. Five laboratory periods. Pre- 
requisites: Art 211 and 221. Spring Quarter. Campus I. 

Advanced problems in designing for posters, packages, magazine and 
newspaper advertisements and all types of commercial art. Study of 
the place of creative design in present day trends in advertising. 

210. Lettering. 5 hours. Five laboratory periods. Winter Quarter. 
Campus I. 

Survey of the historic styles of lettering with a thorough study 
of the Roman alphabet. Modern brush and pen lettering. Layout 
and advertising problems with the use of appropriate type. 

POTTERY AND CRAFTS 

261. Pottery. 5 hours. Five laboratory periods. Fall and Spring 
Quarters. Campus I. 

Practice in handbuilding. Study of vase forms and other ceramic 



138 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

262. Pottery. 5 hours. Five laboratory periods. Winter Quarter. 
Campus I. 

Pottery building on wheel, molding, decorating and glazing. 

263. Pottery. 5 hours. Five laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Art 
261. Spring Quarter. Campus I. 

Continuation of 262. 

265. Pottery. 3 hours. Three laboratory periods. No prerequisite. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Campus I. 

Elementary course in pottery. 

270. Modelling. 5 hours. Five laboratory periods. Prerequisite: 
Art 221. Winter Quarter. Campus I. 

A course designed to give the student experience in working with 
solid media: clay or plastilina. Portrait and life models and weekly 
compositions. Also casting in plaster. 

251. Crafts. 5 hours. Five laboratory periods. Prerequisites: Art 
211 and 221. Fall Quarter. Campus II. 

Metal work, batik, and block printing. Introductory course in the 
handling of the tools and materials used in the crafts listed. 

252. Crafts. 5 hours. Five laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Art 

351. Winter Quarter. Campus II. 

Continuation of Art 351 with more advanced problems and further 
research into the various methods used in these crafts. 

253. Crafts. 5 hours. Five laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Art 

352. Spring Quarter. Campus II. 

Full projects in the execution of original designs in the various 
crafts, stressing the suitability of the design to the medium and the 
ultimate use of the object. 

255. Crafts. 3 hours. Three laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Art 
30. Fall and Winter Quarters. Campus II. 

Introductory course in crafts designed to give experience in working 
with a variety of tools and materials. Simple problems in weaving, 
dyeing, batik, embroidery, metal and reed work, and other projects 
related to home furnishing. 

256. Crafts. 3 hours. Three laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Art 
255. Winter and Spring Quarters. Campus II. 

Continuation of Art 255 with more advanced problems in one or 
two crafts. 

INTERIOR DECORATION 

388. History of Interior Decoration. 3 hours. Lecture. Winter 
Quarter. Campus II. 

A history of the development of furniture, furniture design and 
decoration, with visits to furniture shops and decorating establish- 
ments. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 139 

390. Interior Decoration. 5 hours. Five laboratory periods. Pre- 
requisite: Art 211. Fall Quarter. Campus I. 

Simple problems in line, space, light, form, color and texture, as 
applied to interiors. Creating original designs in furniture and re- 
lated furnishings. Rendering to scale. 

391. Interior Decoration. 5 hours. Five laboratory periods. Pre- 
requisites: Art 211 and 221. Winter Quarter. Campus I. 

Study of types of rooms and suitable furnishings. Study of periods 
and present day trends. Executing original designs by scale models. 
Choice and actual arrangement of complete furnishings for a room. 

200 a-b. General Art. 6 hours. (Three hours per quarter). The 
equivalent of five laboratory periods per week for six weeks. Prere- 
quisites: Art 211 and 221. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Cam- 
puses I and II. 

This is a special course designed for a limited number of students, 
who, in the opinion of their major professor and the head of the 
Department of Art, are qualified to carry on the work independent 
of regularly scheduled classroom hours. 

With the advice of the Faculty the student will select from a list 
of projects those which suit his particular needs. Each project will 
have a credit value based on the normal count of time required for 
the completion of such a project. The student will assume full respon- 
sibility for time spent on each project. Criticism periods to be ar- 
ranged with the instructor. When the accumulated values equal a 
half course credit the requirements of the first unit of this course 
will have been fulfilled. Acceptance of problems will be determined 
by accomplishments rather than the amount of time spent. The list 
of projects includes problems in design, applied arts, drawing, paint- 
ing, and pottery. Scheduling of this course must be approved by 
Head of Art Department. 

200. General Art. 5 hours. Prerequisites: Art 211 and 221. Fall, 
Winter, and Spring Quarters. (Same course as 200 a-b, except credit 
to be 5 hours complete in one quarter instead of 6 hours over two 
quarters). Campuses I and II. 

Scheduling of this course must be approved by Head of Art Depart- 
ment. 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

314. Art Education. 5 hours. Five laboratory periods per week. 
Fall Quarter. Campus I. 

A study of trends in present day art education. Organization of 
the art curriculum in relation to the general program. Practice in 
drawing, painting, design, lettering, block printing and other work 
designed for students who are planning to teach art. 

315. Art Education. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. Campus I. 
Drawing, art appreciation, compositions in various mediums and 

other phases of art suitable for the grades and high school. 



140 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

GRADUATE COURSES 

800. General Art. 5 hours. Five laboratory periods per week. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Dodd. 

802. Drawing and Composition. 5 hours. Five laboratory periods 
per week. Prerequisites: Art 223, 234, 202. Fall Quarter. Campus 
I. Mr. Dodd. 

803. Drawing and Composition. 5 hours. Five laboratory periods 
per week. Prerequisite: Art 802. Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. 
Dodd. 

804. Drawing and Composition. 5 hours. Five laboratory periods 
per week. Prerequisite: Art 803. Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. 
Dodd. 

831. Painting. 5 hours. Five laboratory periods per week. Pre- 
requisites: Art 202, 223, 234. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Dodd. 

832. Painting. 5 hours. Five laboratory periods per week. Pre- 
requisite Art 831. Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Dodd. 

833. Painting. 5 hours. Five laboratory periods per week. Pre- 
requisite: Art 832. Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Dodd. 

BACTERIOLOGY 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

350. Introductory Bacteriology. 5 hours. Two lecture or recita- 
tion and three double laboratory periods. Laboratory fee $2.50. Break- 
age fee $2.50. Prerequisites: Chemistry 21-22 (or 21-24) and two 
courses in Biological Science. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. 
Campus I. Mr. Burkhart and Mr. Kuhn. 

This course is offered for students in Agriculture, Home Economics, 
Pharmacy and B.S. in Chemistry. It consists of an introduction to 
bacteriological principles and technique. 

351. Bacteriology. 5 hours. Two recitation or lecture and three 
double laboratory periods. Laboratory fee $2.50. Breakage fee $2.50. 
Prerequisite: Bacteriology 350. Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. 
Burkhart. 

This course includes bacterial physiology and classification (con- 
tinued from Course 350) and an introduction to sanitary bacteriology 
and serology. 

SENIOR DIVISION OR GRADUATE COURSES 

400 (Sr.) 600 (Gr.). General Bacteriology. 5 hours. Two lecture 
and three double laboratory periods. Laboratory fee $2.50. Breakage 
fee $2.50. Prerequisites: Chemistry 340a and Botany 21-22 or Zoology 
25-26. Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Kuhn. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 141 

This course deals with the biology of the bacteria and the tech- 
niques employed in the study of them. It is offered for B.S. students 
who have a background in the biological sciences. 

401 (Sr.) 601 (Gr.). Pathogenic Bacteria. 5 hours. Two recita- 
tions or lecture and three double laboratory periods. Laboratory fee 
$2.50. Breakage fee $2.50. Prerequisite: Bacteriology 406. Winter 
Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Kuhn. 

This course deals with typical disease producing bacteria. 

406 (Sr.) 606 (Gr.). Infection and Immunity. 5 hours. Two recita- 
tion or lecture and three double laboratory periods. Laboratory fee 
$2.50. Breakage fee $2.50. Prerequisites: Bacteriology 400 and Zoology 
309 and 356. Zoology 357 and Chemistry 351 are also recommended. 
Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Kuhn. 

Mechanisms of infection and resistance, including serology. 

402 (Sr.) 602 (Gr.). Dairy Bacteriology. 5 hours. 

403 (Sr.) 603 (Gr.). Soil Bacteriology. 5 hours. 
405 (Sr.) 605 (Gr.). Food Bacteriology. 5 hours. 

Laboratory fee for each course $2.50. Prerequisites: Bacteriology 350 
and 351. Campus I. These courses should be scheduled by arrange- 
ment with the Department. Mr. Burkhart. 

BOTANY 

JUNIOR DIVISION COURSES 

21. Elementary Botany. 5 hours. Five one-hour laboratory-dis- 
cussion periods. Laboratory fee $2.50. Fall, Winter, and Spring 
Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Duncan, Mr. Harrold, and Mr. Worley. 

A study of (a) the structure of leaves, stems, and roots, (b) growth 
and nutritive processes of plants, and (c) the relations of plants to 
their environment. 

22. Elementary Botany (Continued). 5 hours. Five one-hour lab- 
oratory-discussion periods. Laboratory fee $2.50. Fall, Winter, and 
Spring Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Duncan, Mr. Harrold, and Mr. Worley. 

A study of reproduction, variation, heredity, and evolution of seed 
plants, with studies of representatives of the other major plant groups 
and their importance. 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

305. Field Botany. 5 hours. One lecture and four double labora- 
tory periods. Laboratory fee $2.50. Prerequisite: Botany 21-22. Spring 
Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Duncan. 

A study of principles and rules underlying plant classification with 
practice in identification of local flowering plants. 



142 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

323. Elementary Plant Anatomy. 5 hours. Five two-hour labora- 
tory periods. Laboratory fee $2.50. Prerequisite: Botany 21-22. Winter 
Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Harrold. 

The origin and development of the organs and tissue system of 
vascular plants, and a comparative study of the structures of roots, 
stems, leaves, flowers and fruits. 

358. Methods in Plant Histology. 5 hours. Five two-hour labora- 
tory periods. Laboratory fee $2.50. Prerequisite: Botany 21-22. Spring 
Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Harold. 

Principles and methods of killing, fixing, embedding, sectioning, 
staining, and mounting plant materials for microscopic study. 

375. Plant Ecology. 5 hours. Five two-hour periods; laboratory, 
discussion and field trips. Laboratory fee $2.50. Prerequisite: Botany 
21-22. Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Duncan. 

The relationship of plants and plant communities to the environ- 
ments in which they grow. 

380. Plant Physiology. 5 hours. Two lecture and three two-hour 
laboratory periods. Laboratory fee $2.50. Breakage deposit $2.50. 
Prerequisites: Botany 21-22 and a background in physics and chem- 
istry. Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Worley. 

A physiological survey of processes occurring in economic plants 
and the conditions which affect them. 

SENIOR DIVISION OR GRADUATE COURSES 

406 (Sr.) 606 (Gr.). Taxonomy of Woody Plants. 5 hours. One lec- 
ture and four two-hour laboratory periods. Laboratory fee $2.50. 
Prerequisite: Botany 21-22 and permission of instructor. Fall Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. Duncan. 

Studies in identification of Georgia trees and shrubs, with emphasis 
on identification in winter condition. 

431 (Sr.) 631 (Gr.). Morphology of Seed Plants. 5 hours. One lec- 
ture and four two-hour laboratory periods. Laboratory fee $2.50. 
Prerequisites: Botany 21-22 and 323. Time by arrangement. Campus 
I. Mr. Harrold. 

Critical studies of representative seed plants, considering their de- 
velopment, morphology, and relationships. 

471 (Sr.) 671 (Gr.). Taxonomy of Seed Plants. 5 hours. Two lec- 
ture and three two-hour laboratory periods. Laboratory fee $2.50. 
Prerequisites: Botany 305 and one other Senior Division course in 
Botany. Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Duncan. 

A study of the concepts and system of classification, problems of 
nomenclature, and the taxonomy of specialized groups. 

472 (Sr.) 672 (Gr.). Taxonomy of Seed Plants (Continued). 5 
hours. Two lecture and three two-hour laboratory periods. Laboratory 



GENERAL INFORMATION 1£3 

fee $2.50. Prerequisites: Botany 471 or 671. Spring Quarter. Campus 
I. Mr. Duncan. 

A continuation of course 471. 

480 (Sr.) 680 (Gr.). General Physiology. 5 hours. Three lecture 
and two two-hour laboratory periods. Laboratory fee $2.50. Breakage 
deposit $5.00. Prerequisites: Botany 21-22 or Zoology 21-22, and Chem- 
istry 21-22-23 and 346 or its equivalent. Fall Quarter. Campus I. 
Mr. Worley. 

The lectures include a study of the physical and chemical basis 
of living protoplasm, the laboratory periods include the use of analyt- 
ical measurements and determinations of physiological phenomena. 

482 (Sr.) 682 (Gr.). Nutrition of Green Plants. 5 hours. Two 
lectures and three two-hour laboratory periods. Laboratory fee $2.50. 
Breakage deposit $5.00. Prerequisites: Botany 380 and one other 
Senior Division course in Botany. Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. 
Worley. 

A survey of the nutrition of the higher plants, including major and 
minor elements and deficiency symptoms. 

483 (Sr.) 683 (Gr.). Advanced Plant Physiology. 5 hours. Two 
lectures and three two-hour laboratory periods. Laboratory fee $2.50. 
Breakage deposit $5.00. Prerequisites: Botany 380 or 480 and 482-682. 
Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Worley. 

A study of the syntheses of commercial products produced by eco- 
nomic plants. 

Note: For courses in Genetics see Zoology 370. For courses in 
Mycology see Plant Pathology 420 (620) and 421 (621). These courses 
are accepted for Botany credit. 

CHEMISTRY 

JUNIOR DIVISION COURSES 

Physical Science 1-2. The Chemistry Department cooperates with 
the departments of Physics, Geology and Geography in giving these 
courses. 

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

JUNIOR DIVISION COURSES 

21. Inorganic Chemistry. 5 hours. Four lectures or recitations 
and one laboratory period. Fee $2.50. Breakage deposit $5.00. Fall 
and Winter Quarters. Campuses I, II, and III. Mr. Carter, Mr. Brock- 
man, Mr. Mote, Mr. Whitehead, Mr. Wilder, Mr. Coggin, and Assistants. 

A general course in the chemistry of the non-metallic elements, 
including a systematic treatment of chemical principles and their 
applications. 



144 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

22. Inorganic Chemistry. 5 hours. Four lectures or recitations 
and one laboratory period. Fee $2.50. Breakage deposit $5.00. Pre- 
requisite: Chemistry 21. Winter and Spring Quarters. Campuses I 
and III. Mr. Brockman, Mr. Whitehead, Mr. Mote, Mr. Coggin, and 
Assistants. 

A continuation of Chemistry 21, including a general survey of the 
metallic elements. 

24. Inorganic Chemistry. (For Agricultural students). 5 hours. 
Four lectures or recitations and one laboratory period. Fee $2.50. 
Breakage deposit $5.00. Prerequisite: Chemistry 21. Winter and 
Spring Quarters. Campus II. Mr. Carter, Mr. Wilder, Mr. Coggin, 
and Assistants. 

A continuation of Chemistry 21, with especial emphasis on subject 
matter related to agriculture. 

370. Inorganic Industrial Chemistry. 5 hours. No fee. Prere- 
quisite: Chemistry 22 or 24, or their equivalents, and one other chem- 
istry course with laboratory. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Brock- 
man. 

Important chemical processes and recent chemical developments in 
various industries. 

SENIOR DIVISION OR GRADUATE COURSES 

420 (Sr.) 620 (Gr.). Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. 5 hours. 
No fee. Prerequisite: Chemistry 22, or equivalent, and two other 
chemistry courses with laboratory. Fall Quarter 1941 and Summer 
of 1941. Campus I. Mr. Whitehead. 

Chemical laws, theories, and hypotheses. 

421 (Sr.) 621 (Gr.). Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. 5 hours. 
No fee. Prerequisite: Chemistry 23, and one other chemistry course 
with laboratory. Fall Quarter 1940 and Summer of 1940. Campus I. 
Mr. Brockman. 

The lesser known elements. 

422 (Sr.) 622 (Gr.). Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. 5 hours. 
One lecture and four laboratory periods. Fee $2.50. Breakage de- 
posit $5.00. Prerequisite: Chemistry 22, or equivalent, and two other 
chemistry courses with laboratory. Spring Quarter 1941 and Sum- 
mer of 1942. Campus I. Mr. Mote. 

Theory and practice of inorganic preparations. 

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY 

JUNIOR DIVISION COURSES 

23. Qualitative Inorganic Analysis. 5 hours. Two lectures or 
recitations, and three laboratory periods. Fee $2.50. Breakage de- 



GENERAL INFORM ATIO N 145 



posit $5.00. Prerequisite: Chemistry 22 and 24. Fall and Spring 
Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Whitehead and Assistants. 

The fundamental theories of qualitative analysis and analyses of the 
common cations and anions. 

380. Quantitative Inorganic Analysis. 5 hours. Two lectures and 
three laboratory periods. Fee $2.50. Breakage deposit $5.00. Prere- 
quisite: Chemistry 23. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Campus 
I. Mr. Whitehead. 

The fundamental theories of quantitative analysis and typical gravi- 
metric, volumetric, and oxidimetric analyses. 

SENIOR DIVISION OR GRADUATE COURSES 

480 (Sr.) 680 (Gr.). Advanced Quantitative Analysis. 5 hours. 
One lecture or recitation and four laboratory periods. Fee $2.50. 
Breakage deposit $5.00. Prerequisite: Chemistry 380. Spring Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. Whitehead. 

A continuation of Chemistry 380, including electrometric, iodimetric, 
and colorimetric determinations, and also the theory and use of organic 
precipitants in analytical chemistry. 

481 (Sr.) 681 (Gr.). Comaiebcial Analysis. 5 hours. One lecture 
or recitation and four laboratory periods. Fee $2.50. Breakage de- 
posit $5.00. Prerequisites: Chemistry 380 and 340a or equivalent. 
Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Whitehead. 

The analysis of alcohols, sugars, nitrogen, compounds, cellulose 
derivatives and oils as applied to commercial products. 

482 (Sr.) 682 (Gr.). Special Methods of Analysis. 5 hours. One 
consultation and four laboratory periods. Fee $2.50. Breakage de- 
posit $5.00. Prerequisite: Chemistry 481. Campus I. By arrange- 
ment. Mr. Whitehead. 

Special analytical methods such as potentiometric titrations, elec- 
trometric determinations, chemical microscopy, and others. This 
course will be varied to suit the needs of the individual student. 

AGRICULTURAL AND BIOCHEMISTRY 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 
(See Courses 21, 24 and 346) 

351. Physiological Chemistry. 5 hours. Three lectures or recita- 
tions and two laboratory periods. Fee $2.50. Breakage deposit $5.00. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 346 or 340a. Spring Quarter. Campus II. 
Mr. Coggin. 

Fundamental principles of physiological chemistry in the animal 
body including the chemistry of foods, digestion, metabolism and 
excretions. 



146 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

352. Biochemistry. 5 hours. Four lectures or recitations and one 
laboratory period. Fee $2.50. Breakage deposit $5.00. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 346 or 340 a. Winter Quarter. Campus II. Mr. Coggin. 

The fundamental principles of biochemistry, both plant and animal. 

360. Agricultural Organic Chemistry. 5 hours. Three lectures 
or recitations and two laboratory periods. Fee $2.50. Breakage de- 
posit $5.00. Prerequisite: Chemistry 346. Campus II. Mr. Carter. 

A continuation of Chemistry 346 dealing principally with aromatic 
compounds and with organic reactions. 

361. Agricultural Chemistry. 5 hours. No fee. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 346. Fall Quarter. Campus II. Mr. Wilder. 

Chemical aspects of germination, synthesis, catabolism and residues 
of plants and the chemical compounds of soils, fertilizers, and in- 
secticides. 

362. Agricultural Chemistry. 5 hours. No fees. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 346. Winter Quarter. Campus II. Mr. Wilder. 

The chemistry of feed-stuffs and animal metabolism and the chem- 
ical composition of animal products. 

368. Microchemical Analysis of Soils. 5 hours. Five lectures, 
recitations, or laboratory periods. Fee $2.50. Breakage deposit $5.00. 
Prerequisites: Chemistry 346, and Soils 10. Spring Quarter. Campus 
II. Mr. Wilder. 

Methods of soil sampling and tests employed for the determination 
of some water soluble cations and anions most frequently found in 
soils. 

450 (Sr.) 650 (Gr.). Biochemistry. 5 hours. Five lectures, recita- 
tions, or laboratory periods. Fee $2.50. Breakage deposit $5.00. Pre- 
requisite: Chemistry 351 or 352. Campus II. Offered upon request. 
Mr. Carter and Mr. Coggin. 

Introduction to biochemical research. 

460 (Sr.) 660 (Gr.). Agricultural Quantitative Analysis. 5 hours. 
One lecture or recitation and four laboratory periods. Fee $2.50. 
Breakage deposit $5.00. Prerequisite: Chemistry 380. Winter Quarter. 
Campus II. Mr. Wilder. 

Analyses of dairy products, feeds and feed-stuffs, fertilizers, in- 
secticides, and methods of soil and water analysis. 

461 (Sr.) 661 (Gr.). Advanced Agricultural Quantitative Analysis. 
5 hours. One lecture or recitation and four laboratory periods. Fee 
$2.50. Breakage deposit $5.00. Prerequisite: Chemistry 460 or 660. 
Spring Quarter. Campus II. Mr. Wilder. 

A continuation of Chemistry 460 or 660. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 147 

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

340 a-b. Organic Chemistry. 10 hours. Five hours per quarter. 
Three or four lectures or recitations and one or two laboratory peri- 
ods. Fee $5.00 ($2.50 for each quarter). Breakage deposit $10.00 
($5.00 for each quarter). Prerequisite: a grade of 70 or better in 
Chemistry 21 and 22 or 24. 340 a— Fall and Winter Quarters. 340 b 
— Winter and Spring Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Scott, Mr. Coggin, 
and Assistants. 

Chemistry 340 a — The aliphatic hydrocarbons and their derivatvies. 

Chemistry 340 b — A continuation of 340 a and a treatment of the 
coal tar compounds. 

346. Elements of Organic Chemistry. (For Agricultural and Home 
Economics students). 5 hours. Four lectures or recitations and one 
laboratory period. Fee $2.50. Breakage deposit $5.00. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 22 or 24. Fall and Spring Quarters — Campus II. Spring 
Quarter — Campus III. Mr. Carter, Mr. Coggin, Mr. Mote, and Mr. 
Wilder. 

A brief introduction to organic chemistry. 

371. Organic Industrial Chemistry. 5 hours. No fee. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 346 or 340 a-b. Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Brockman. 

Important chemical processes and recent developments in various 
organic chemical industries. 

SENIOR DIVISION OR GRADUATE COURSES 

440 (Sr.) 640 (Gr.). Advanced Organic Preparations. 5 hours. 
One consultation and four laboratory periods. Fee $2.50. Breakage 
deposit $5.00. Prerequisite: A grade of 80 or better in Chemistry 
340 a-b. Fall and Spring Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Scott. 

Selected syntheses such as Grignard, Friedel and Craft, Acetoacetic 
ester and others, also oxidations, reductions, and condensations. 

441 (Sr.) 641 (Gr.). Organic Qualitative Analysis. 5 hours. One 
consultation and four laboratory periods. Fee $2.50. Breakage de- 
posit $5.00. Prerequisite: Chemistry 440 or 640. Fall and Winter 
Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Scott. 

Identification of pure organic compounds and of mixtures. 

442 (Sr.) 642 (Gr.). Organic Quantitative Analysis. 5 hours. One 
consultation and four laboratory periods. Fee $2.50. Breakage de- 
posit $5.00. Prerequisite: Chemistry 441 and 380. By arrangement. 
Campus II. Mr. Whitehead. 

Quantitative analysis of organic compounds of carbon, hydrogen, 
oxygen, and nitrogen by combustion; the determination of halogens 



148 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

and sulfur by the bomb method. Both macro and micro methods are 
available. 

449 (Sr.) 649 (Gr.). Introduction to Organic Research. 5 hours. 
One consultation and four library or laboratory periods. Fee $2.50. 
Breakage deposit $5.00. Prerequisite: Chemistry 441 or 641. Fall, 
Winter, and Spring Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Scott. 

A study of chemical literature and the laboratory preparation of 
several substances, the directions for whose formation are to be 
found only in the original literature. 

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

390. Elements of Physical Chemistry. 5 hours. No fee. Prere- 
quisite: Chemistry 340 a or 346. Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. 
Mote. 

A brief introduction to physical chemistry, designed primarily for 
pre-medical students. 

490 a-b (Sr.) 690 a-b (Gr.). Physical Chemistry. 12 hours. Four 
lectures or recitations and two laboratory periods. Fee $5.00 ($2.50 
for each quarter). Breakage deposit $10.00 ($5.00 for each quarter). 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 380 and 340 a or 346. Fall and Winter 
Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Mote. 

The two courses 490 a-b or 690 a-b cover the fundamental principles 
of physical chemistry. 

492 (Sr.) 692 (Gr.). Advanced Physical Chemistry. 5 hours. 
Three lectures or recitations and two laboratory periods. Fee $2.50. 
Breakage deposit $5.00. Prerequisite: Chemistry 490 a-b or 690 a-b. 
Campus I. Mr. Mote. Offered upon request. 

Selected topics in physical chemistry. 

493 (Sr.) 693 (Gr.). Advanced Physical Chemistry. Chemical 
Thermodynamics. 5 hours. No fee. Prerequisite: Chemistry 490 a-b 
or 690 a-b. Campus I. Mr. Mote. Offered upon request. 

CLASSICAL CULTURE 

JUNIOR DIVISION COURSES 

Classical Culture 1 a-b-c. 9 hours. (Three hours each quarter). 
Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Campuses I and III. Mr. McWfwr- 
ter. 

A study of the characteristics and influence of Greek and Roman 
culture, made principally through translations of Greek and Latin 
writers. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 149 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

Latin 458. Roman Literature in Translation. 5 hours. Spring 
Quarter. Campus I. Mr. McWhorter. 

A detailed study in translation of contributions to world literature 
of representative Roman writers. 

COMMERCE 

(For Economics courses, see page 154) 

JUNIOR DIVISION COURSES 

6. Principles of Accounting. First course. 5 hours. Fall, Winter, 
and Spring Quarters. Campuses I and III. Mr. Raisty, Mr. Leyden, 
Mr. Brakefield, and Mr. Scheider. 

An introduction to the fundamental principles and practices of ac- 
counting; the construction and interpretation of balance sheet and 
profit and loss statements; the theory of debits and credits as applied 
to business transactions. 

7. Principles of Accounting. Second course. 5 hours. Prerequi- 
site: Commerce 6. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Campus I. 
Mr. Raisty, Mr. Leyden, Mr. Brakefield, and Mr. Scheider. 

An application of accounting principles to certain specialized prob- 
lems, such as proprietorship under the various forms of business or- 
ganization; manufacturing accounts and manufacturing cost controls; 
accounting for fire losses, consignments, bonds, and sinking funds. 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

300 a-b-c. Shorthand. 9 hours. (Five hours per week for three 
quarters.) Campus I. Mr. Ellis. 

A complete course in Gregg shorthand theory and dictation, with 
emphasis on accuracy and speed. A minimum speed of 100 words 
per minute is required at the end of the third quarter. 

A student may take shorthand without typewriting, but in order 
to complete the requirements for Commerce 300 c he must have had 
Commerce 304 or its equivalent. 

303. Typewriting. First course. 2 hours. (Five hours per week.) 
Fall and Winter Quarters. Fee $5.00. Campus I. Mr. Ellis. 

A first course in typewriting. The objectives of this course are to 
teach the keyboard; to make error analyses; to establish correct typ- 
ing habits; to give the student an introduction to typing problems of 
the business office. 

304. Typewriting. Second course. 2 hours. (Five hours per week). 
Winter and Spring Quarters. Fee $5.00. Campus I. Mr. Ellis. 

A continuation of Commerce 303, with emphasis on typing problems 
of the business office, including! the business letter, tabulation, manu- 
script typing, and the development of speed and accuracy. 



150 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

305. Typewriting. Third course. 2 hours. (Five hours per week). 
Fall and Spring Quarters. Fee $5.00. Campus I. Mr. Ellis. 

A continuation of Commerce 304. Emphasis is placed on the ac- 
curate and skillful use of the typewriter in office typing projects: 
typing office forms, tabulation, legal documents, typing from rough 
draft, and other advanced exercises. Minimum speed and accuracy 
requirement of 45 words per minute. 

308. Business Correspondence. 5 hours. Fall and Winter Quarters. 
Prerequisite: English 2. Campus I. Mr. Ellis. 

Instruction in the use of correct business English in writing let- 
ters and reports. Attention will be given to letters involving sales 
and purchases, credits and collections, applications, recommendations, 
acknowledgments, tabular reports, and other communications of a 
routine business nature. 

309. Methods of Teaching Commercial Subjects. 5 hours. Winter 
Quarter. Campus I Mr. Ellis. 

A course designed for prospective high school teachers of com- 
mercial subjects, including a brief background history of the develop- 
ment of commercial education, the commercial curriculum, modern 
methods and materials in the teaching of commercial subjects. 

310. Office Training. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Commerce 300 a-b-c 
and 305. Spring Quarter. Fee $5.00. Campus I. Mr. Ellis. 

An advanced secretarial course with emphasis on secretarial duties; 
business ethics; mechanics of letter writing; business and legal forms; 
filing; shipping; duplicating; office appliances; actual office work. 

340. Business Practice. 15 hours. Prerequisite: Three years col- 
lege work leading to B.S.C. degree. 

A few superior students are permitted in their senior year to enter 
business establishments for the purpose of obtaining practical experi- 
ence. The period of absence is limited to one quarter. For details 
of the plan see bulletin of the School of Commerce. 

354. Intermediate Accounting. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Prerequi- 
site: Commerce 6 and 7. Campus I. Mr. Leyden. 

Advanced technique and theory as applied to the accounting process. 

Mathematics 356. The Elements of Statistics. 5 hours. Fall, 
Winter, and Spring Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Gumming. 

A course in statistical methods offered by the Department of Mathe- 
matics and treating the collection, classification and presentation of 
statistics. This course is required of all candidates for the B.S.C. 
degree. 

Mathematics 357. Advanced Statistics. Fall, Winter, and Spring 
Quarters. Prerequisite: Mathematics 356. Campus I. Mr. Gumming. 

Mathematics 361. The Mathematics of Investment. 5 hours. Fall 
and Spring Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Stephens and Mr. Gumming. 

A course in the mathematics of annuities, bonds, and insurance, 
offered by the Department of Mathematics. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 151 

370. Business Law. First course. 5 hours. Fall and Winter 
Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Heckman. 

The fundamental general laws of business with emphasis on the 
Georgia law; contracts, agency, negotiable instruments. 

371. Business Law. Second course. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Com- 
merce 370. Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Heckman. 

A continuation of Commerce 370, dealing with sales, partnership, 
corporations, bankruptcy, real estate, insurance and banking. 

375. Principles of Transportation. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. Cam- 
pus I. Mr. Jenkins. 

A study of the principles of transportation with special emphasis 
on the history and regulation of steam railways here and abroad. 

387. Life Insurance. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. 
Scheider. 

The uses of life insurance; mortality tables; types of policies; re- 
serves and policy values; organization of life insurance companies; 
group and industrial insurance; unemployment insurance and old age 
pensions; state supervision of life insurance. 

397. Property and Casualty Insurance. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. Scheider. 

The functions of fire and casualty insurance; organization of car- 
riers; standard policies; essentials of insurance law; types of under- 
writers; settlement of losses; clauses and forms; marine and inland 
marine insurance; automobile, title, credit and other miscellaneous 
forms of property and casualty insurance. 

SENIOR DIVISION OR GRADUATE COURSES 

412 (Sr.) 612 (Gr.). Auditing. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Commerce 
6 and 7. Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Leyden and Mr. Brake- 
field. 

An introduction to auditing theory and practice. The qualifications, 
duties, and responsibilities of the public auditor; problems involved 
in making detailed and balance sheet audits. 

413 (Sr.) 613 (Gr.). Cost Accounting. 5 hours. Prerequisite: 
Commerce 6 and 7. Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Leyden and 
Mr. Brake-field. 

Methods of ascertaining and distributing costs, illustrated with 
formal sets; standard cost problems and estimated cost systems. 

415 (Sr.) 615 (Gr.). Income Tax Accounting. 5 hours. Prerequisite: 
Commerce 6 and 7. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Heckman. 

An interpretation of Federal and State income tax laws with prac- 
tice material requiring an application of their provisions to the re- 
turns of individuals, partnerships, and corporations. 

416 (Sr.) 616 (Gr.). Accounting Problems. 5 hours. Prerequisite: 
Commerce 354. Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Heckm,an. 

Intended to prepare students for the examinations set by the State 



152 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Board of Examiners for the certificate of Certified Public Accountant. 

417 (Sr.) 617 (Gr.). C. P. A. Review. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Com- 
merce 416. Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Heckman. 

Immediately preceding the May C. P. A. examination in Georgia, 
students are drilled in the problems likely to be covered in the major 
subjects of the examination. 

418 (Sr.) 618 (Gr.). Municipal Accounting. 5 hours. Spring Quar- 
ter. Campus I. Mr. Raisty. 

The study of accounting problems and procedures pertaining to state 
and local governments and their institutions; governmental classifica- 
tion of receipts and expenditures; preparation of reports; budgeting 
and operation of fund accounts. 

419 (Sr.) 619 (Gr.). Tax Accounting. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. Heckman. 

A continuation of Commerce 415 (Sr.) 615 (Gr. with emphasis 
upon corporation income tax laws, social security taxes, gift taxes 
and estate taxes. 

420 a-b-c. Machine Accounting. 9 hours (Three hours per quarter). 
Campus I. Mr. Winter. 

This course is restricted to those majoring in accounting, and is 
designed to familiarize the students with the use of the punch card 
accounting equipment. Complete sets of books will be used to bring 
out the various uses of the machines for accounting purposes. Regis- 
tration for this course is with permission of instructor. 

426 (Sr.) 626 (Gr.). Banking. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. Campus 
I. Mr. Sutton. 

An analysis of the banking function; types of banking institutions; 
the history of American banking; detailed treatment of the Federal 
Reserve System. 

430 (Sr.) 630 (Gr.). Corporation Finance. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. Sutton. 

The promotion and organization of corporations; forms of securities 
issued; problems of financial administration; analysis of the causes 
of failures; the rehabilitation of bankrupt corporations. 

431 (Sr.) 631 (Gr.). Investments. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. Cam- 
pus I. Mr. Sutton. 

The elements of an "ideal" investment; the examination and test- 
ing of specific investment securities issued by railroad, public utility, 
industrial, mining, shipping, and other corporations. 

462 (Sr.) 662 (Gr.). Retailing. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. Campus 
I. Mr. Jenkins. 

The organization and operation of various types of retail merchan- 
dising units; the principles of store management, market analysis 
and alternative methods and agencies. 

463 (Sr.) 663 (Gr.). Advertising. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Campus 
I. Mr. Jenkins. 

A comprehensive survey covering the history and economics of 



GENERAL INFORMATION lj>3 

advertising, advertising research, techniques, effectiveness, and the 
advertising organization. The economic aspects of advertising are 
emphasized rather than the techniques of copy and layout. 

464 (Sr.) 664 (Gr.). Sales Management. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. Jenkins. 

Sales administration, planning, and execution, as applied to manu- 
facturing and wholesaling concerns. 

488 (Sr.) 688 (Gr.). The Securities Market. 5 hours. Winter 
and Spring Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Sutton. 

A study of the organization and functions of the New York Stock 
Exchange; types of transactions, types of traders, brokerage houses, 
the nature of speculation; relation of business cycles to stock prices; 
forecasting. 

DRAMATIC AET 

JUNIOR DIVISION COURSES 

30. History of the Theater. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Campus I. 
Mr. Crouse. 

A general survey of the development of the theater from Greece to 
the present, including study of representative plays of each period, 
forms and methods of production, and theater structures. 

33. Acting: Pantomime and Diction. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. Crouse. 

Training in effective stage movement and correct speaking; study 
of characterization in the theater. Students appear in production 
directed by members of Dramatic Art 350. 



SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

334. Technical Production. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Campus I. 
Mr. Crouse. 

Scene building, rigging, and handling; construction drawings; and 
other technical problems of the theater. Students handle the produc- 
tion of University Theater plays. 

335. Scene Design. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. 
Crouse. 

The relation of the fine and applied arts to stage design; technique 
of designers' drawings. 

336. Stage Lighting. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Physical Science 1 
or Physics 20. Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Crouse. 

Study of the aesthetic and mechanical problems of lighting in the 
theater; lighting instruments; elementary physics of light and elec- 
tricity; operation of a stage switchboard. 

350. Play Production and Directing. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. Crouse. 

Principles of effective stage direction — movement, composition, 



154 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

rhythm, dramatic structure. Recommended for students who will 
teach in high schools or colleges. Each member of the course must 
direct a one-act play cast from students in Dramatic Art 33. 

ECONOMICS 
(For Commerce courses, see page 149) 

JUNIOR DIVISION COURSES 

1. An Introduction to Business. 5 hours. Fall, Winter, and Spring 
Quarters. Campus I. Spring Quarter, Campus III. Mr. Scheider and 
Mr. Brakefield. 

A survey of the functions and practices of modern business, and a 
description of economic institutions. 

5. Principles of Economics. 5 hours. Fall, Winter, and Spring 
Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Brooks,, Mr. Segrest, and Mr. Beckwith. 

A description and critical analysis of the organization of modern 
society from an economic point of view, with a brief introduction 
to the theory of value and; distribution, provided specifically for stu- 
dents in departments other than the School of Commerce. 

55 a-b-c. Principles of Economics. 9 hours. (Three hours per quar- 
ter.) Campuses I and III. Mr. Sutton, Mr. Beckwith, and Mr. Segrest. 

This course in the Principles and Problems of Economics will be 
offered on the extensive basis and is required of all sophomores in 
the School of Commerce. Other students may take this course, if 
Economics 5 does not fit in with their schedules. 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

333. American Economic History. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. Cam- 
pus I. Mr. Segrest. 

A survey of American economic development from the colonial 
period to the present, with emphasis on the economic factors involved 
in American sectional conflicts and political institutions. 

360. Principles of Marketing. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Campus I. 
Mr. Jenkins. 

The production of time, place, and possession utilities. The market 
and marketing institution are studied from the functional approach. 

361. Marketing Problems. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. Campus I. 
Mr. Jenkins. 

A second course in marketing, considering the role of marketing 
in competitive economic society and desirable improvements in mar- 
keting methods, with application to cases and problems. 

380. International Trade. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. Mr. Beck- 
with. 

An examination of the theory of international trade and trade 
policies; international debts, reparations, and monetary movements 
are discussed as illustrative material. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 155 

384. Social Security. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. 
Segrest. 

A survey of the field of social insurance with special emphasis on 
the Federal Social Security Act. Attention is given to the experience 
of European countries in this field. 

385. Personnel Administration. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Psychology 
1. Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Segrest. 

The principles and practices in the field of the administration of 
human relations in industry. A discussion of such problems as worker 
selection, advancement, job analysis, wages, worker education, health 
and safety. 

394. European Economic History. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. Cam- 
pus I. Mr. Beckwith. 

The economic institutions and ideas of the ancient world; an ex- 
tended examination of the economic aspects of feudalism; the rise of 
capitalism and the evolution of economic life in Europe as related 
to the early development of the western hemisphere. 

SENIOR DIVISION OR GRADUATE COURSES 

406 (Sr.) 606 (Gr.). Advanced Economics. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. Beckwith. 

This course includes (1) a review of elementary work in the theory 
of value and distribution under pure competition or monopoly, (2) 
the theory of value and distribution under duopoly, oligopoly and 
monopolistic competition, and (3) the problem of value and distribu- 
tion under collectivism. 

407 (Sr.) 607 (Gr.). The History of Economic Thought. 5 hours. 
Mr. Beckwith. (Not offered 1940-41). 

A review of the history of economic theory. The evolution of the 
important principles of economics, with emphasis laid on the history 
of the theories of value and distribution. 

434 (Sr.) 634 (Gr.). Public Finance. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. Raisty. 

A general consideration of American public expenditures, revenues, 
and fiscal administration; classification and purposes of expenditures; 
tax assessment and administration; analysis of different kinds of 
taxes with respect to incidence, productivity and position in the fiscal 
structure; governmental borrowing and indebtedness. 

435 (Sr.) 635 (Gr.). State and Local Public Finance. 5 hours. 
Prerequisite: Economics 434. Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Raisty. 

A detailed treatment of the revenues, expenditures, and fiscal ad- 
ministration of Georgia and its political subdivisions; special tax 
commission reports; Georgia tax laws and their administration; coun- 
ty and municipal assessment principles and practices; revenues and 
expenditures and methods of debt control. 

436 (Sr.) 636 (Gr.). Business Cycles. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. Beckwith. 



156 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

A survey of the more significant theories of the business cycle and 
of proposals for preventing the occurrence of such cycles. 

437 (Sr.) 637 (Gr.). Comparative Economics. 5 hours. Spring 
Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Beckwith. 

A comparative study of the economic systems of Germany, Italy, 
the U. S. S. R., and Sweden, with special attention to the difficulties 
of economic planning and price control. 

441 (Sr.) 641 (Gr.). Public Administration. 5 hours. Winter 
Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Raisty. 

A consideration of the general principles and problems of public 
administration; the organization of administrative agencies; recruit- 
ments, promotion, removal and organization of personnel; budgeting, 
auditing, purchasing and borrowing practices; legislative and judicial 
relations. 

442 (Sr.) 642 (Gr.). County and Municipal Administeation in Geor- 
gia. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Economics 441. Spring Quarter. Campus 
II. Mr. Raisty. 

A detailed study of the principles and problems of administration in 
Georgia counties and municipalities with especial emphasis upon the 
administration of such functions as public safety, education, public 
health, charities and corrections, local improvements and finances. 

450 (Sr.) 650 (Gr.). Money and Credit. 5 hours. Fall and Winter 
Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Sutton. 

The course deals with the financial organization of society; money 
standards, money and prices, and the nature and functions of credit. 

455 (Sr.) 655 (Gr.). Economic Problems. Winter Quarter. Campus 
I. Mr. 8 eg re st. 

The application of economic theory to certain problems of con- 
temporary economic life, such as the problems of monopoly and its 
regulation, Federal regulation and control in general, business cycles, 
protective tariffs, public finance, industrial conflict. 

459 (Sr.) 659 (Gr.). Economic Geography of the Old World. 5 
hours. Winter Quarter. Campus II. Mr. Jenkins. 

Economic and regional geography of Europe, Asia, Africa, and 
Australasia, with a brief survey of the social, political, and his- 
torical geography of major regions. 

465 (Sr.) 665 (Gr.). Market Research and Analysis. 5 hours. 
Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Jenkins. 

The presentation of the function of marketing research in economic 
activity, of the scope of marketing research for the individual busi- 
ness enterprise, and of the scientific approach in applying research 
procedures to marketing problems. 

466 (Sr.) 666 (Gr.). Economics of Consumption. 5 hours. Fall 
Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Jenkins. 

A study of how the distribution of income, education, social environ- 
ment, occupation, home-making skill, personal ambitions, size of 
family, and other factors influence consumption and limit markets, 



GENERAL INFORMATION 157 

the difficulties the consumer faces in the purchase of goods and the 
protection which is provided for his welfare. 

486 (Sr.) 686 (Gr.). Labor Problems. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. Segrest. 

A study of wages, working conditions, unemployment, hours, work- 
er's welfare schemes, labor legislation, and labor organizations. Cur- 
rent developments in labor are discussed. 

EDUCATION 

A. ADMINISTRATION 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

375. School Organization and Control. 5 hours. Prerequisite: 
Education 301 and 304. Summer Quarter only. Campus I. 

390. School Administration for Teachers. 5 hours. Prerequisite: 
Three courses in education. Spring Quarter. Mr. Pusey. 

SENIOR DIVISION OR GRADUATE COURSES 

410. (Sr.) 610 (Gr.). Visual Aids in Education. 5 hours. Prere- 
quisite: Education 304. Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Ritchie. 

584 (Sr.) 784 (Gr.). Fundamentals of a Guidance Program. 3 
hours. Prerequisite: Education 304. Spring Quarter. Campus I. 
Mr. Williams. 

590a-b-c (Sr.) 790 a-b-c (Gr.). Public School Administration. 9 
hours. (Three hours per quarter.) Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. 
Prerequisite: Four courses in education. Campus I. Mr. Cocking 
and Mr. Pusey. 

593 (Sr.) 793 (Gr.). Administration of Rural Schools. 5 hours. 
Prerequisite: Education 304 and 421 (621). 

594 (Sr.) 794 (Gr.). High 1 School Administration. 3 hours. Pre- 
requisite: Four courses in education. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. 
Pusey. 

595 (Sr.) 795 (Gr.). State and County School Administration. 5 
hours. Prerequisite: Education 590. Summer Quarter only. Campus 
I. Mr. Irby. 

597 (Sr.) 797 (Gr.). The School Plant. 5 hours. Prerequisite: 
Courses in Public School Administration. Campus I. Fall Quarter. 
Mr. Pusey. 

598 (Sr.) 798 (Gr.). School Finance and Business Management. 
5 hours. Prerequisite: Courses in Public School Administration. 
Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Pusey. 



158 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

GRADUATE COURSES 

822. School Law. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Courses in Public School 
Administration. Summer Quarter only. Campus I. 

824. School Personnel. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Courses in Public 
School Administration. Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Williams. 

B. CURRICULUM 

SENIOR DIVISION OR GRADUATE COURSES 
421 (Sr.) 621 (Gr.). The School and the Social Order. 5 hours. 
Prerequisite: Education 301 and 304. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quar- 
ters. Campus I. Mr. Morrow and Mr. Singleton. 

504 (Sr.) 704 (Gr.). Fundamentals of the Curriculum. 5 hours. 
Prerequisite: Education 304 and 421. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. 
Morrow. 

505 (Sr.) 705 (Gr.). Curriculum Problems of the Public Schools. 
5 hours. Prerequisite: Education 504 (704). Every Quarter. Campus 
I. Mr. Morrow. 

507 (Sr.) 707 (Gr.). Secondary School Curriculum. 5 hours. Pre- 
requisite: Education 381, 504 (704). Campus I. Mr. Morrow. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

805. Research on the Curriculum. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Educa- 
tion 504 (704). Every Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Morrow. 

C. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

355. Children's Literature. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Education 371. 
Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mrs. Sutton. 

371. Directed Observation. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Education 304 
and 392. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Jordan 
and Mrs. Sutton. 

392. Elementary School Curriculum. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Edu- 
cation 304. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Campus I. Miss 
Houx and Mrs. Sutton. 

376-377. Supervised Teaching. 5 or 10 hours. Prerequisite: Educa- 
tion 371 and 392. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Campus I. 
Mr. Jordan, Mrs. Sutton, Miss Houx, and Mr. Singleton. 



GENERAL INFORMATION T59 

GRADUATE COURSES 

840-841. Supervision of Instruction in the Elementary Schoool. 
Two course sequence. 6 hours. Fall and Winter Quarters. Pre- 
requisite: Education 371, 392, and 376-77. Campus I. Mrs. Sutton, 
Miss Houx, and Mr. Jordan. 

D. SECONDARY EDUCATION 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

341. Materials and Methods in Teaching English in High School. 
5 hours. Prerequisite: Education 381 and four courses in English. 
Winter Quarter. Campus I. 

371. Directed Observation. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Education 301 
and 304. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Jordan, 
Mrs. Sutton, Miss Houx, and Mr. Singleton. 

376-377. Supervised Teaching. Half-day or full-day periods. 5 or 
10 hours. Prerequisite: Education 371 and 381. Fall, Winter, and 
Spring Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Jordan, Mrs. Sutton, Miss Houx, 
and Mr. Singleton. 

381. Methods of Teaching in Secondary Schools. 5 hours. Prere- 
quisite: Education 304 and 421 (621). Fall, Winter, and Spring 
Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Jordan and Mr. Singleton. 

382. Materials and Methods in Teaching Social Studies in the 
High School. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Education 381 and four courses 
from the social science major. Winter Quarter. Campus I. 

383. Materials and Methods of Teaching Mathematics in High 
School. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Education 381 and four courses from 
the mathematics major. Winter Quarter. Campus I. 

SENIOR DIVISION OR GRADUATE COURSES 

456 (Sr.) 656 (Gr.). Advanced French Syntax and Composition. 5 
hours. Prerequisite: French 304. Winter Quarter. Mr. Chance. 

507 (Sr.) 707 (Gr.). Secondary School Curriculum. 5 hours. Pre- 
requisite: Education 381, 504 (704). Winter Quarter. Campus I. 
Mr. Morrow. 

517 (Sr.) 717 (Gr.). Problems of Teaching. 5 hours. Prerequisite: 
Education 304 and 421 (621) or 580. Winter Quarter. Campus I. 
Mr. Jordan. 

580 (Sr.) 780 (Gr.). Principles of Secondary Education. 5 hours. 
Prerequisite: Education 304. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Pusey. 



160 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

594 (Sr.) 794 (Gr.). High School Administration. 3 hours. Prere- 
quisite: Four courses in education. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. 
Pusey. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

830-831. Supervision of Instruction in the Secondary Schools. 
Two course sequence. Total 6 hours. Prerequisite: Education 381, 
272, and 376-377. Fall and Winter Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Jordan, 
Miss Houx, and Mr. Singleton. 

850. The Junior College. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Education 304 
and 421 or 580. Campus I. 

E. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

304. Educational Psychology. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Education 
301. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Campus I and III. Mr. 
Greene, Mr. Williams, and Mr. Ritchie. 

SENIOR DIVISION OR GRADUATE COURSES 

552 (Sr.) 752 (Gr.). Psychology of Childhood. 3 hours. Prere- 
quisite: Education 304. Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Greene. 

555 (Sr.) 755 (Gr.). Psychology of Adolescence. 3 hours. Prere- 
quisite: Education 304. Fall and Spring Quarters. Campus I. Mr. 
Morrow. 

558 (Sr.) 758 (Gr.). The Measurement of Intelligence. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: Education 304 and 556 (756). Winter Quarter. Campus 
I. Mr. Greene. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

802. Advanced Educational Psychology. 5 hours. Prerequisite: 
Education 304. Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Greene. 

809. Educational Diagnosis and Treatment of Exceptional Chil- 
dren. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Education 304. Fall Quarter. Campus 
I. Mr. Greene. 

810. Principles of Teaching Exceptional Children. 3 hours. Pre- 
requisite: Education 304. Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Greene. 

811. Problems in Educational Psychology. 3 hours. Spring Quar- 
ter. Campus I. Mr. Greene. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 161 



F. HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION 

JUNIOR DIVISION COURSES 

1. Introduction to Education. 5 hours. Fall, Winter, and Spring 
Quarters. Campuses I and III. Mr. Cocking, Mr. Williams, and Mr. 
Singleton. 

SENIOR DIVISION OR GRADUATE COURSES 

421 (Sr.) 621 (Gr.). The School and the Social Order. 5 hours. 
Prerequisite: Education 301 and 304. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quar- 
ters. Campus I. Mr. Morrow. 

500 (Sr.) 700 (Gr.). History of Education. 5 hours. Prerequisite: 
Education 302, 304, and 421 (621) or 580. Winter Quarter. Campus 
I. Mr. Ritchie. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

803. Philosophy of Education. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Education 
304 and 421 (621) or 580. Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Ritchie. 

870. Comparative Education. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Education 301, 
304, and 421 (621). Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Ritchie. 

871. Adult Education. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Education 421 (621). 
Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Aderhold and Mr. Cocking. 

G. RESEARCH AND MEASUREMENT 

SENIOR DIVISION OR GRADUATE COURSES 

515 (Sr.) 715 (Gr.). Statistical Methods in Education. 5 hours. 
Prerequisite: Education 304 and 556. Fall Quarter. Offered on Satur- 
days or late afternoons. Campus II. Mr. Greene. 

556 (Sr.) 756 (Gr.). Educational Tests and Measurements. 3 
hours. Prerequisite: Education 304. Fall and Spring Quarters. Cam- 
pus I. Mr. Ritchie. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

805. Research on the Curriculum. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Educa- 
tion 504 (704). Every Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Morrow. 

815. Advanced Educational Statistics. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Edu- 
cation 515 (715). Spring Quarter. Campus I. 

816. Methods and Application of Educational Research. 3 hours. 
Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Cocking. 

851. Advanced Educational Measurement. 5 hours. Prerequisite: 



162 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Education 515 and 556. Offered on Saturdays and late afternoons. 
Campus I Mr. Greene. 

901-902-903. Research Problems in Education. 3, 6, or 9 hours. 
Prerequisite: Education 515, 556. Entrance to the course only by 
special permission of the Dean of the College. Every Quarter. Cam- 
pus I. Mr. Cocking and Staff. 

900. Thesis and Dissertation Seminar. (Non-credit) . Campus I. 
Mr. Cocking and Staff. 

H. VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 
(I). AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

346-347. Apprentice Teaching. 10 hours. Full-time placement for 
one quarter. Prerequisite: Education 451, 452, and 471. Fall, Winter, 
and Spring Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Aderhold and Mr. Wheeler. 

SENIOR DIVISION OR GRADUATE COURSES 

451 (Sr.) 651 (Gr.). Agriculture Curriculum. 5 hours. Prerequi- 
site: Education 301, 304, and 421. Fall and Spring Quarters. Campus 
I. Mr. Aderhold and Mr. Wheeler. 

452 (Sr.) 652 (Gr.). Materials and Methods in Teaching Agricul- 
ture. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Education 304, 421, 451. Fall Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. Aderhold and Mr. Wheeler. 

471 (Sr.) 671 (Gr.). Teaching Agriculture to Adults. 5 hours. 
Prerequisite: Must have consent of instructor. Fall Quarter. Campus 
I. Mr. Aderhold and Mr. Wheeler. 

529 (Sr.) 729 (Gr.). Vocations and Education. 5 hours. Prere- 
quisite: Education 451 and 471. Campus I. Mr. Wheeler. 

583 (Sr.) 783 (Gr.). Vocational Guidance. 5 hours. Prerequisite: 
Education 304, and 421 (621). Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. 
Wheeler. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

902. Problems of Training Vocational Teachers. 5 hours. Prere- 
quisite: Education 451 and 471. Campus I. Mr. Wheeler. 

904. Supervision of Vocational Teaching. 5 hours. Prerequisite: 
Education 451 and 471. Mr. Aderhold. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 1_6_3 

(II). HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

346-347. Appeentice Teaching. (Home Economics Section). 10 hours. 
Prerequisite: Education 397. A full quarter's work in one of the 
Georgia high schools approved for apprentice teaching in homemak- 
ing. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Miss Beall, Miss Schmidt, 
Miss Todd, and Resident Teachers of Homemaking. 

389. Administration of Home-Making Department in High Schools. 
S hours. Prerequisite or parallel: Education 397. Summer Quarter. 
Campus I. 

396. Home Economics Curricula. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Educa- 
tion 421. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Campus I. Miss Todd, 
Miss Beall, and Miss Schmidt. 

397. Special Methods in Teaching Home Economics. 5 hours. 
Prerequisite: Education 396. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. 
Miss Todd, Miss Beall, and Miss Schmidt. 

SENIOR DIVISION OR GRADUATE COURSES 
477 (Sr.) 677 (Gr.). Home Economics Programs for Adults. 5 hours. 
Prerequisite: Education 397 or its equivalent. Alternate summers. 
Even years. Campus I. 

581 (Sr.) 781 (Gr.). Curriculum Units in Home Economics. 5 
hours. Prerequisite: Education 396 or 504. Summer Quarter. Cam- 
pus I. Miss Todd. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

856. Measurement of Home-Making Instruction. 5 hours. Prere- 
quisite: Education 397. Summer Quarter. Campus I. 

881. Problems in Home Economics Teaching. 5 hours. Prerequi- 
site: Education 397 and 389 or its equivalent. Summer Quarter. 
Campus I. Miss Todd. 

904. Supervision of Vocational Teaching. (Home Economics Sec- 
tion). 5 hours. Prerequisite: Two or more successful years' experi- 
ence in teaching homemaking, and special consent of instructor. Sum- 
mer Quarter. Campus I. 

ENGLISH 

JUNIOR DIVISION COURSES 

2 a-b-c. Composition. 9 hours. (Three hours per quarter.) Fall, 
Winter, and Spring Quarters. Campuses I and III. English Staff. 
4 a-b-c. Survey of Engllsh Literature. 9 hours. (Three hours 



164 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

each quarter.) Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Campuses I and 
III. English Staff. (Not offered 1940-41.) 

It is advisable that this course be alternated throughout the year 
with the survey course in English and American history (History 
124, 125, 126). 

6 a-b-c. Reading, and Oral and Written Composition. 9 hours. 
(Three hours each quarter.) Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Cam- 
pus I. English Staff. 

Inductive approach to the reading and writing of the English 
language. Compulsory for students in B.S. Agriculture and Agri- 
cultural Engineering, and open to certain other students after con- 
sultation with instructors. 

7. Introduction to the Drama. 3 hours. Fall Quarter. Campuses 
I and III. English Staff. 

Certain plays from Shakespeare or other dramatists will be studied. 

8. Introduction to Prose Fiction. 3 hours. Winter Quarter. Cam- 
puses I and III. English Staff. 

Some short stories will be studied, but the stress of the course will 
be placed on the study of the novel. 

9. Introduction to Poetry. 3 hours. Spring Quarter. Campuses 
I and III. English Staff. 

Various poems will be read and interpreted. 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

English 2 a-b-c and Humanities 1 a-b-c are prerequisite to all Senior 
Division courses. 

305. Lyric Poetry. 5 hours. Soring: Quarter. Campus I. Mr. 
Park and Mr. Walker. 

343. Contempory Drama. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. Campus I. 
Mr. Park. 

351. Music and Literature. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. Campus I. 
Mr. Brown. 

A comparative study of the forms, relationships, and aesthetics of 
music and literature. Admission by consent of the instructor. 

359. The English Folk Song. 51 hours. Fall Quarter. Campus I. 
Mr. Walker and Mr. Hodgson. 

360 a-b-c. Advanced Composition. 9 hours. (Three hours per quar- 
ter.) Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Campus I. Mr. West. 

361. The Short Story. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. 
Eidson. 

375 a-b-c. The English Novel. 9 hours. (Three hours per quar- 
ter.) Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Campus I. Mrs. McWhorter. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 165 

SENIOR DIVISION OR GRADUATE COURSES 

Note: When the following courses are taken for graduate credit, 
two Senior Division courses in English must be added to the prere- 
quisites listed. 

400 (Sr.) 600 (Gr.). Old English. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. Cam- 
pus I. Mr. Calvin Brown. 

402 (Sr.) 602 (Gr.). Chaucer. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. Campus 
I. Mr. Calvin Brown. 

403 (Sr.) 603 (Gr.). The Age of Milton. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. Davidson. 

404 (Sr.) 604 (Gr.). The Age of Pope. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. Davidson. 

405 (Sr.) 605 (Gr.). The Age of Johnson. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. Davidson. 

406 a-b-c (Sr.) 606 a-b-c (Gr.). The Romantic Movement. 9 hours. 
(Three hours per quarter.) Campus I. Mr. Everett. 

407|a-b-c (Sr.) 607 a-b-c (Gr.). The English Drama to 1642. 9 
hours. (Three hours per quarter.) Campus I. Mr. Parks and Mr. 
West. (Not offered 1940-41.) 

409 (Sr.) 609 a-b-c (Gr.). Elizabethan Prose and Non-Dramatic 
Poetry. 9 hours. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Campus I. 
Mr. West. 

Fall: Spenser — The Faerie Queene and minor poems. 
Winter: Prose of Lodge, Nashe, Greene, Sidney, et al. 
Spring: Elizabethan lyric through Donne. 

410 (Sr.) 610 (Gr.). History of? the English Language. 5 hours. 
Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Calvin Brown. 

420 (Sr.) 620 (Gr.). American Literature to 1865. 5 hours. Fall 
Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Wade, Mr. Parks, and Mr. Eidson. 

422 (Sr.) 622 (Gr.). American Literature from 1865 to the Present. 
5 hours. Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Wade, Mr. Parks, and Mr. 
Eidson. 

429 (Sr.) 629 (Gr.). Southern Literature. 5 hours. Spring Quar- 
ter. Campus I. Mr. Wade, Mr. Parks, and Mr. Eidson. 

English 420 and 422 are not open to students who have credit 
for old English 320; English 429 is not open to students who have 
credit for old Englsih 321. \ 

430 (Sr.) 630 (Gr.). Literary Criticism. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. Parks. 

440 a-b-c (Sr.) 640 a-b-c (Gr.). Shakespeare. 9 hours. (Three hours 



166 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

per quarter.) Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Campus I. Mr. 
Walker. 

442a-b-c (Sr.) 642 a-b-c (Gr.). The Victorian Age. 9 hours. (Three 
hours per quarter.) Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Campus I. 
Mr. Everitt. 

FORESTRY 

JUNIOR DIVISION COURSES 

2. Farm Forestry. 5 hours. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. 
Campus II. Mr. Grant. 

A general course for agricultural students dealing with forestry 
from the farmer's standpoint. 

21 a-b-c. The Field of Forestry. 3 hours. Campus II. Mr. Weddell. 

An introductory course designed to acquaint forestry students with 

the field of forestry. The class will meet one day a week each quarter. 

25. Field Dendrology. 3 hours. Summer Camp. Prerequisite: 
Forestry 82. Mr. Bishop. 

Identification of the woody plants of the Southern Appalachian 
Mountains. One day a week for ten weeks at summer camp. 

26. Forest Surveying. 9 hours. Summer Camp. Prerequisite: 
Agricultural Engineering 11. Mr. Grant and Mr. Watson. 

The application of plane surveying to forest problems; practice 
in making boundary and topographic surveys of forest tracts. Three 
days a week for ten weeks at summer camp. 

27. Mapping and Cruising. 3 hours. Summer Camp. Prerequisite: 
Forestry 26. Mr. Grant and Mr. Watson. 

Field study in the methods of measuring the contents of trees and 
growth in forest stands; practice in timber estimating, log scaling 
and in the use of forest instruments; type mapping. One day a week 
for ten weeks at summer camp. 

28. Forest Improvements. 3 hours. Summer Camp. Prerequisite: 
Forestry 26. Mr. Grant and Mr. Weddell. 

Location, design and construction of improvements required for 
the administration of forest properties, including roads, trails, bridges, 
lookout towers, telephone lines, buildings, camps, and recreational 
facilities. One day a week for ten weeks at summer camp. 

82. Regional Dendrology. 6 hours. Three lectures and three lab- 
oratory periods. Fall and Winter Quarters. Campus II. Mr. Bishop. 

A general consideration of the more important forest trees of the 
United States, with particular reference to their identification, dis- 
tribution, and silvical requirements. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 167 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

308. Forest Protection. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Campus II. Mr. 
Bishop. 

The protection of forests from fire. 

351. Forest Mensuration. 5 hours; 3 lectures, 2 laboratories. Fall. 
Winter, and Spring Quarters. Prerequisite: Mathematics 41, Agricul- 
tural Engineering 11. Mr. Watson. 

The principles and practice of determining the volume of timber 
products, logs, trees, and stands; log rules and scaling; principles 
of graphical presentation; the theory of sampling; elementary statis- 
tical methods. 

352. Forest Mensuration. 5 hours; 3 lectures, 2 laboratories. Win- 
ter Quarter. Prerequisite: Forestry 351. Campus II. Mr. Watson. 

The construction and use of volume tables; the study of the age, 
growth, and yield of trees and stands including the construction and 
application of yield tables; the methods of checking tables to be used. 

356 a-b-c. Silviculture. Triple course. 15 hours; 3 lectures and 

2 laboratories each quarter. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Pre- 
requisite: Botany 21-22, Forestry 82. Campus II. Mr. McKellar. 

The effect of the various factors of site upon the characteristics, 
growth and development of forest trees and stands; the origin and 
development of forest types and communities; the principles and 
methods used in securing both natural and artificial reproduction 
including nursery practice; intermediate cuttings; the application 
of silvicultural methods in the different forest regions of the United 
States. 

364. Forest Recreational Improvements. 3 hours. Fall Quarter. 
Campus II. Mr. Bishop. 

The formulation of forest recreational plans; the construction of 
roads, trails, camps, and other essential recreational improvements. 

373. Wood Anatomy and Timber Products. 6 hours; 3 lectures and 

3 laboratories. Winter and Spring Quarters. Prerequisite: Forestry 
82. Campus II. Mr. Grant. 

Macroscopic and microscopic identification of the more important 
woods of the United States; the preparation, manufacture and use of 
tree products other than lumber. 

375. Chemical Wood Utilization. 5 hours; 3 lectures, 2 labora- 
tories. Winter Quarter. Prerequisite: Forestry 376. Campus II. 
Mr. Grant. 

The utilization of wood in the manufacture of pulp, paper, rayon 
and other cellulose products. 

376. Utilization. 6 hours; 4 lectures, 2 laboratories. Fall Quarter. 
Prerequisite: Forestry 373. Campus II. Mr. Grant. 

Methods of logging, transporting logs and manufacturing lumber. 



168 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

381. General Forestry. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. Campus II. 
Mr. Grant. 

A general course for students in landscape architecture, designed 
to acquaint them with the field of forestry and the native and natural- 
ized trees of Georgia, and their identification in the field. 

385. Game Management. 3 hours. Fall and Spring Quarters. Cam- 
pus II. Mr. McKellar. 

A general course dealing with game management and game man- 
agement policy and administration; the relation of game management 
to forestry and forest management. 

390. Forest Finance. 3 hours. Fall Quarter. Prerequisite: Eco- 
nomics 5, Mathematics 41. Campus II. Mr. Patterson. 

The financial aspects of forestry as a business enterprise; method of 
determining the value of forest property; the rate earned by forest 
properties; the appraisal of stumpage values; the appraisal of damage. 

391. Forest Economics. 3 hours. Fall Quarter. Prerequisite: 
Economics 5, Forestry 356. Campus II. Mr. Watson. 

The forest as a natural resource; the past history of forest develop- 
ment and its effect on forest resources; the production, distribution, 
and consumption of forest products; the effect of concentration of 
supplies on markets and prices; land classification; forest taxation. 

SENIOR DIVISION OR GRADUATE COURSES 

401 (Sr.) 601 (Gr.). Forest Management. 5 hours. Winter Quar- 
ter. Prerequisite: Forestry 352, 356. Campus II. Mr. Patterson. 

The organization of forests for management; their regulation for 
sustained yield; the development of forest working plans. 

402 (Sr.) 602 (Gr.). Forest Management Field Work. 6 hours. 
Spring Camp. Prerequisite: Forestry 401. Mr. Bishop and Mr. Pat- 
terson. 

The preparation of a working plan for a forest property. 

403 (Sr.) 603 (Gr.). Dry Kilning and Wood Preservation. 3 hours. 
Winter Quarter. Campus II. Prerequisite: Forestry 373. Mr. Grant. 

The air-drying, kiln-drying, and preservative treatment of timber. 

404 (Sr.) 604 (Gr.). Forest Improvements, and Administration. 6 
hours. Spring Camp. Prerequisite: Forestry 28, 410. Mr. Bishop 
and Mr. Patterson. 

Administration of forests and the construction of forest improve- 
ments. 

405 a-b (Sr.) 605 a-b (Gr.). Naval Stores Practice. 3 hours. Winter 
Quarter. Campus II. Prerequisite: Forestry 356, 373. Mr. Bishop. 

Factors affecting the production of naval stores; the management 
of forests for naval stores production; the manufacturing and market- 
ing of naval stores products. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 169 

406 (Sr.) 606 (Gr.). Utilization Field Work. 3 hours. Spring 
Camp. Prerequisite: Forestry 356, 373. Mr. Bishop and Mr. Patterson. 

A course designed to give the student personal observations of the 
various phases of the production, manufacture, and use of forest 
products. 

410 (Sr.) 610 (Gr.). Forest Policy. 3 hours. Winter Quarter. 
Prerequisite: Forestry 391. Campus II. Mr. Weddell. 

The development of forest policies and activities of the federal and 
state governments. 

420 (Sr.) 620 (Gr.). Thesis. 5 hours. Prerequisite: 60 hours in 
forestry. Campus II. Mr. Weddell. 

The preparation of a thesis dealing with an assigned forestry 
problem based on original research or compilation. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

801-S02. Advanced Silviculture. 10 hours. Fall and Winter Quar- 
ters. Prerequisite: Forestry 82, 356, Agricultural Engineering 6, 11, 
and Soils 7 or equivalent. Campus II. Mr. Weddell and Mr. McKellar. 

An advanced course dealing .with the various phases of silvics and 
silvicultural management. A specialized problem must be worked 
out during the year and a written report submitted upon completion 
of the work. 

803-804. Advanced Silviculture. 10 hours. Spring Quarter. Pre- 
requisite: Forestry 802. Mr. Weddell and Mr. McKellar. 

A continuation of Forestry 801-802, embodying comprehensive re- 
search in the field of silviculture. The courses 801-802-803-804 form 
a sequence, and a thesis must be submitted upon completion of the 
work. 

811-812. Advanced Dendrology. 10 hours. Fall, Winter, and Spring 
Quarters. Prerequisite: Forestry 82, 373, or equivalent. Mr. Weddell, 
Mr. Grant, and Mr. Bishop. 

A detailed study of the various characteristics of trees. Complete 
herbarium specimens or slides will constitute a part of the work. 

821-822. Advanced Utilization. 10 hours. Fall and Winter Quar- 
ters. Prerequisite: Forestry 373, 376, and 405, or equivalent. Campus 
II. Mr. Weddell, Mr. Grant, and Mr. Bishop. 

An advanced course dealing with the various phases of the pro- 
duction, manufacture and use of forest products including naval stores. 

823-824. Advanced Utilization. 10 hours. Spring Quarter. Pre- 
requisite: Forestry 822. Mr. Weddell, Mr. Grant, and Mr. Bishop. 

A continuation of Forestry 821-822 embodying extensive research 
work. The courses Forestry 821-822-823-824 form a sequence and 
a thesis must be submitted upon completion of the work. 



170 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

GEOLOGY 

JUNIOR DIVISION COURSES 

21. General Geology. (Dynamic and Structural). 5 hours. Three 
lecture or recitation and two laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Physi- 
cal Science 2. Fee $2.50. Fall and Winter Quarters. Campus I. 
Mr. Crickmay. 

The nature and structure of the materials composing the earth and 
the various processes which have shaped or are shaping the earth. 

22. General Geology (Historical). 5 hours. Four lecture or recita- 
tion and one laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Zoology 21 or Zoology 
25. Fee $2.50. Winter and Spring Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Crick- 
may. 

Origin and geological history of the earth and its plant and animal 
inhabitants. 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

330. Physiography. 5 hours. Five lecture or recitation periods 
and occasional field trips. Prerequisite: Geology 21. Winter Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. Crickmay. 

Processes of weathering, erosion, and deposition; development of 
typical land-forms in humid, semi-arid, and arid climates. 

350. Mineralogy and Introductory Petrology. 5 hours. Two lecture 
or recitation and three laboratory periods. Fee $2.50. Prerequisite: 
Geology 21 and Chemistry 22. Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. 
Crickmay. 

General characteristics, origin, mode of occurrence, nomenclature, 
and description of the more common rocks and rock-making minerals. 

GEOGRAPHY 

JUNIOR DIVISION COURSES 

1. Principles of Geography. 5 hours. Not offered 1940-41. Campus 
I. Mr. Sell. 

A general survey course dealing with the fundamental principles of 
modern geography. The interpretation and use of maps will be 
studied and place geography will be emphasized through the use of 
outline maps. 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

301. Human Geography. 5 hours. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quar- 
ters. Campus I. Mr. Sell. 

The fundamental laws of geography and the adjustments made by 
man in the various regions of the earth, beginning with the simple 
and easily understood determinations in the Congo basin and finally 
reaching the Euramerican culture with its complex environments. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 171 

302. Climate and Land Forms. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. Cam- 
pus I. Mr. Sell. 

This course deals with climate, weather, and land forms together 
with the adjustment that man makes to these various features of 
natural environment. Outline climatic maps and weather graphs 
are used. 

351. Regional Geography. 5 hours. Fall and Spring Quarters. 
Campus I. Mr. Sell. 

The utilization of natural resources as related to the development of 
regions in the Western Hemisphere. The location of products, places 
and resources will be determined with the use of outline maps. 

352. Geography of North America. 5 hours. Not offered 1940-41. 
Campus I. Mr. Sell. 

A regional study of North America in which climate, land forms, 
and natural resources are related to the development of the region. 
Topographic, climatic, and regional outline maps are used in this 
course. 

SENIOR DIVISION OR GRADUATE COURSES 

401 (Sr.) 601 (Gr.). Climatology. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Geography 
302-351. Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Sell. 

An intensive course dealing with climatic controls as well as fac- 
tors involved in determining types of climate. Emphasis will be 
placed on the features of the climate in the United States. 

453 (Sr.) 653 (Gr.). Geography of South America. 5 hours. Pre- 
requisite: 301-351. Fall and Spring Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Sell. 

A regional study of South America in which climate, land forms, 
and natural resources are related to the development of the region. 
Topographic, climatic and regional outline maps are used in the 
course. 

GERMAN 

JUNIOR DIVISION COURSES 

101. Elementary German. 5 hours. Fall and Winter Quarters, 
Campus I. Fall Quarter, Campus III. Mr. Morris, Mr. DuBose, and 
Mr. Terry. 

The first half of a two-course sequence in beginning German, em- 
phasizing the practical command of the language. The course is con- 
ducted in German, and oral exercises form the larger part of the 
classroom instruction. 

102. Elementary German. 5 hours. Winter and Spring Quarters, 
Campus I. Winter Quarter, Campus III. Mr. Morris, Mr. DuBose, 
and Mr. Terry. 

The) second half of a two-course sequence in beginning German, in- 
cluding grammar, translation, and oral exercises 



172 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

103. Intermediate German. 5 hours. Prerequisite: German 101- 
102. Fall and Spring Quarters, Campus I. Spring Quarter, Campus 
III. Mr. Morris, Mr. DuBose, and Mr. Terry. 

Continuation of German 101-102. Reading of intermediate texts, 
oral exercises. German is the language of the classroom. 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

304. Advanced German. 5 hours. Prerequisite: German 103. Fall 
and Winter Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Morris and Mr. DuBose. 

Extensive readings in modern German prose, emphasizing German 
history and culture. Composition' and oral exercises. German is the 
language of the classroom. 

305. Advanced German. 5 hours. Prerequisite: German 304. Win- 
ter and Spring Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Morris and Mr. DuBose. 

Extensive readings in modern German prose, with especial emphasis 
on the history of German literature. Wide parallel reading, composi- 
tion, and oral exercises. Only German spoken in class. 

306. Scientific German. 3 hours. Prerequisite: German 103. Win- 
ter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. DuBose and Mr. Terry. 

Extensive readings from modern German scientific literature, em- 
phasizing chemical German. 

307. Scientific German. 3 hours. Prerequisite: German 103. Cam- 
pus I. Mr. DuBose and Mr. Terry. Not offered 1940-41. 

Extensive readings from modern German scientific literature, with 
especial attention to biological and medical German. 

358. Teutonic Elements in Modern English. 5 hours. Prerequi- 
site: German 103. Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Morris. (Not 
offered 1940-41.) 

SENIOR DIVISION OR GRADUATE COURSES 

430 (Sr.) 630 (Gr.). Das Deutsche Drama des 19. Jahrhunderts. 3 
hours. Prerequisite: German 305. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. 
Terry. 

Lectures, reports, and readings from the leading German dramatists 
of the 19th Century, including Kleist, Grillparzer, Hebbel, Sudermann, 
and Hauptmann. 

431 (Sr.) 631 (Gr.). Der Deutsche Roman des 19. Jahrhunderts. 
3 hours. Prerequisite: German 305. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. 
Terry. 

Lectures, reports, and extensive reading of the works of Hauff. 
Ludwig, Freytag, Storm, Keller, Fontane, Meyer, Scheffel and other 
German novelists of the 19th Century. 

432 (Sr.) 632 (Gr.). Einfuehrung in die Werke Goethes. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: German 305. Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Morris. 

Study of Goethe'g life, with lectures, reports, and readings from his 
poems, novels, and plays. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 173 

433 (Sr.) 633 (Gr.). Goethe's Faust. 3 hours. Prerequisite: German 
432. Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Morris. 

Reading and interpretation of Part I of Faust, with commentaries 
of the leading Goethe scholars. 

434 (Sr.) 634 (Gr.). Die Deutsche Liteeatub von den Anfaengen bis 
1500. 3 hours. Prerequisite: German 305. Spring Quarter. Campus 
I. Mr. Morris. 

Lectures, reports, and reading in modern German translation of 
the principal works of German literature up to the Reformation. 

435 (Sr.) 635 (Gr.). Lessing und die Deutsche Klassik. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: German 305. Campus I. Mr. DuBose. Not offered in 
1940-41. 

Lectures, reports, and reading of the principal plays and essays 
of Lessing, with especial attention to his influence on the dramas of 
Goethe and Schiller. 

436 (Sr.) 636 (Gr.). Die Deutsche Romantik. 3 hours. Prerequi- 
site: German 305. Not offered in 1940-41. Campus I. Mr. Terry. 

Lectures, reports, and readings from the authors of the German 
Romantic School, including Schlegel, Tieck, Novalis, Hoffman, and 
Eichendorff. 

437 (Sr.) 637 (Gr.). Einfuehrung in die Webke Schillebs. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: German 305. Not offered in 1940-41. Campus I. Mr. 
DuBose. 

Reading of the principal works of the great German dramatist. 

438 (Sr.) 638 (Gr.). Deutsche Literatub deb Gegenwabt. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: German 305. Not offered in 1940-41. Campus I. Mr. 
Terry. 

Lectures and reports on the literary movements of the 20th Century 
in Germany, with extensive readings from the principal authors. 

439 (Sr.) 639 (Gr.). Die Deutsche Lybik. 3 hours. Prerequisite: 
German 305. Not offered in 1940-41. Campus I. Mr. Terry. 

Extensive reading of German lyrics and ballads from the Min- 
nesingers to the present time. 

GREEK. 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

301 a-b-c. Beginning Gbeek. Geography and History. 15 hours. Fall, 
Winter, and Spring Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Bocock. 

354. Homer, Lysias, Plato. 3 hours. Fall Quarter. Campus I. 
Mr. Bocock. 

355. The Tbagic Poets. 3 hours. Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. 
Bocock. 

456. Intboduction to the Study of Eubopean Litebatube: Gbeek 



174 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Literature in Translation. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. 
Bocock. 

Greek 456 and 457 given in 1939-40 and in alternate years there- 
after. Membership in this class is limited to twenty. 

457. Greek Literature in Translation. 5 hours. Prerequisite: 
Greek 456. Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Bocock. 

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

The Department of History and Political Science is cooperating 
with the School of Commerce and the Department of Social Work in 
offering courses in Public Administration. Economics 434, Economics 
441, Economics 442, and courses dealing with Public Administration 
in the Department of Social Work will be approved for students 
majoring in Political Science. 

JUNIOR DIVISION COURSES 

1. American Government. 5 hours. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quar- 
ters, Campus I. Winter Quarter, Campus III. Mr. McPherson, Mr. 
Pound, Mr. Saye, Mr. Martin, Mr. Hughes, and Mr. Stephens. 

An introductory course covering the essential facts of federal, 
state, and local governments in the United States. 

4. Constitutional History of England. 5 hours. Winter and 
Spring Quarters, Campus I. Spring Quarter, Campus III. Mr. Payne, 
and Mr. Martin. 

Britain to 1689, plus the development of the cabinet and the British 
Empire. 

y 124. English Background to American History. 3 hours. Fall 
Quarter. Campuses I and III. Mr. Payne, Mr. Martin, and Mr. Steph- 
ens. 

The English political, social, economic, and cultural background 
as an introduction to the study of American History. 

History 124-125-126 form a sequence of courses, two or all of which 
should be taken in proper chronological order. 

125. England and Anglo- America in the Seventeenth and Eigh- 
teenth Centuries. 3 hours. Winter Quarter. Campuses I and III. 
Mr. Payne, Mr. Pound, Mr. Stephens, and Mr. Martin. 

An interpretative introduction to the study of the history of the 
nited States. 



f 



126. The United States. 3 hours. Spring Quarter. Campuses I 
and III. Mr. Pound and Mr. Stephens. 

A continuation and expansion of History 124. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 175 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

305. Problems of Modern Britain. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. Cam- 
pus I. Mr. Payne. 

379 a-b. Introduction to the Study of Contemporary International 
Relations. 10 hours. Fall and Winter Quarters. Campus I. Mr. 
Bocock. 

Offered for 1940-41 and in alternate years thereafter. Membership 
in this class is limited to twenty. As a parallel course students are 
advised to take History 458, History of American Diplomacy. 

385. The History of Political Thought to 1789. 5 hours. Fall 
Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Saye. 

This course is an historical study of the development of ideas 
relative to the state and government in ancient, medieval, and early 
modern times. Attention is directed primarily to the political thought 
of a carefully selected group of eminent philosophers, including Plato, 
Aristotle, Cicero, Egidius Romanus, St. Thomas Aquinas, Bodin, 
Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau. 

386. The History of Political Thought since 1789. 5 hours. Win- 
ter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Saye. 

History 386 forms a sequence to History 385. Either of the courses 
may be taken separately, but since emphasis is given to the growth 
of political thought, it is preferable to take History 385 first. 

SENIOR DIVISION OR GRADUATE COURSES 

402 (Sr.) 602 (Gr.). European History. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. Pound. 

An advanced course covering the period from 1500 to 1763. Courses 
numbered 477, 402, 403, 404 form a sequence but any one of the four 
may be elected without completing the sequence. 

403 Sr.) 603 (Gr.). Modern Europe. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. Pound. 

An advanced course covering the period from 1763 to 1848. 

404 (Sr.) 604 (Gr.). Recent European History. 5 hours. Spring 
Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Pound. 

An advanced course covering the period from 1848 to the present. 

405 (Sr.) 605 (Gr.). The Genesis of the Constitution. 5 hours. 
Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. McPherson. 

406 (Sr.) 606 (Gr.). State Government. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. Pound. 

An advanced course with particular emphasis upon the government 
of the state of Georgia. 

451 (Sr.) 651 (Gr.). The American Colonies, the Revolution, and 
Union to 1789. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. McPherson. 



176 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

452 (Sr.) 652 (Gr.). The United States from Washington to 
Reconstruction. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. McPher- 
son. 

453 (Sr.) 653 (Gr.). The United States since Reconstruction. 
5 hours. Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. McPherson. 

454 (Sr.) 654 (Gr.). The Civil War. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. Coulter. 

455 (Sr.) 655 (Gr.). The Reconstruction Period. 5 hours. Spring 
Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Coulter. 

456 (Sr.) 656 (Gr.). Recent American History. 5 hours. Spring 
Quarter. Campus II. Mr. Coulter. Not offered 1940-41. 

457 (Sr.) 657 (Gr.). The Ante-Bellum South. 5 hours. Spring 
Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Coulter. 

458 (Sr.) 658 (Gr.). History of American Diplomacy. 5 hours. 
Campus I. Mr. Coulter. Not offered 1940-41. 

459 (Sr.) 659 (Gr.). History of Georgia. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. Coulter. 

471 (Sr.) 671 (Gr.). The French Revolution 1789-1799. 5 hours. 
Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Payne. 

472 (Sr.) 672 (Gr.). Napoleonic Times 1799-1815. 5 hours. Winter 
Quarter. Campus II. Mr. Payne. 

473 (Sr.) 673 (Gr.). Tudor Times 1485-1603. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. Payne. 

474 (Sr.) 674 (Gr.). Stuart Times 1603-1689. 5 hours. Winter 
Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Payne. 

475 (Sr.) 675 (Gr.). Modern Britain 1689-1939. 5 hours. Spring 
Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Payne. 

477 (Sr.) 677 (Gr.). Medieval History. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. Pound. 

The history of western Europe from the fifth through the fifteenth 
century. 

481 (Sr.) 681 (Gr.). Political Science. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. McPherson. 

482 (Sr.) 682 (Gr.). American Government and Politics. 5 hours. 
Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. McPherson. 

History 481 and 482 form a sequence of courses either or both of 
which may be taken. 

491 (Sr.) 691 (Gr.). Latin-American History. 5 hours. Winter 
Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Pound. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 177 



GRADUATE COURSES 

800. Historical Method. Required of all graduate students major- 
ing in history. No credit. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Coulter. 

801. Seminar in Southern History. Non-credit. Winter and Spring 
Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Coulter. 



HOME ECONOMICS 

JUNIOR DIVISION COURSES 

1. Introduction to Home Economics. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Cam- 
pus III. Miss Creswell. 

5. Foods. 5 hours. Two lecture and three double laboratory periods. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters; Campus III. Fall and Spring 
Quarters; Campus II. Mrs. Hood. 

20. Clothing. 5 hours. Two lecture and three double laboratory 
periods. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters; Campus III. Fall Quar- 
ter; Campus II. Miss Hicks and Miss McRae. 

22. Elementary Textiles. 3 hours. Two lecture and one double 
laboratory periods. Fall and Spring Quarters; Campus III. Winter 
Quarter; Campus II. Miss Hicks and Miss McRae. 

FOODS AND NUTRITION 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

306. Foods. Two lectures and three double laboratory periods Fall, 
Winter, and Spring Quarters. Prerequisite: Home Economics 5 and 
Chemistry 346. Campus II. Miss Baird and Mrs. Hood. 

350. Advanced Foods. 5 hours. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. 
Prerequisite: Home Economics 306, 351, or 353 or parallel. Campus 
II. Miss Baird. 

351. Nutrition. 5 hours. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Pre- 
requisite: Chemistry 346 and Home Economics 306. Campus II. Miss 
Newton. 

352. Nutrition. 3 hours. Fall Quarter. Prerequisite: Chemistry 
346. Campus II. Miss Newton. 

353. Dietetics. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. Prerequisite* Home Eco- 
nomics 306 and 352. Campus II. Miss Newton. 

354. Instttutional Cookery. 5 hours. Two lectures and three dou- 
ble laboratory periods. Winter Quarter. Prerequisite: Home Eco- 
nomics 306. Campus II. Mrs. Alexander. 



178 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

355. Catering. 5 hours. Informal laboratory, equivalent to five 
double laboratory periods. Spring Quarter. Prerequisite: Home Eco- 
nomics 354. Campus II. Mrs. Alexander. 

357. Meal Planning. 3 hours. Three laboratory periods. Prere- 
quisite: Home Economics 306, 351, or 353. Campus II. Miss Baird. 

SENIOR DIVISION OR GRADUATE COURSES 
450 (Sr.) 650 (Gr.). Experimental Cookery. 5 hours. Two lectures 
and three double laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Home Economics 
350 or equivalent. Campus II. Miss Baird. 

452 (Sr.) 652 (Gr.). Advanced Nutrition. 5 hours. Prerequisite: 
Home Economics 351 or equivalent, Human Biology 1 and 2. Campus 
II. Miss Newton. 

453 (Sr.) 653 (Gr.). Diet in Disease. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Home 
Economics 353 or 452. Campus II. Miss Newton. 

456 (Sr.) 656 (Gr.). Metabolism Studies. 5 hours. Prerequisite: 
Home Economics 353 or Home Economics 452. Campus II. Miss New- 
ton. 

457 (Sr.) 657 (Gr.). Field Work in Nutrition. 5 hours. Prere- 
quisite: Home Economics 353 or 351. Campus II. Miss Neicton. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

856. Methods of Biological Food Investigation. 5 hours. Prere- 
quisite: Home Economics 353. Campus II. Miss Newton. 

857. Introduction to Research in Nutrition. 5 hours. Prerequisite: 
Home Economics 856. Campus II. Miss Newton. 

TEXTILES AND CLOTHING 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 
321. Clothing Selection and Construction. 5 hours. Two lecture 
and three double laboratory periods. Fall and Winter Quarter . Pre- 
requisites: Home Economics 20, 22, and Art 30. Campus II. Mrs. 
Blair and Miss McRae. 

362. Advanced Clothing Construction and Design. 5 hours. Spring 
Quarter. Prerequisite: Home Economics 321. Campus II. Mrs. Blair. 

363. Costume Design. 5 hours. Two lecture and three double lab- 
oratory periods. Prerequisite: Home Economics 321. Campus II. 
Mrs. Blair. 

364. Advanced Clothing. 5 hours. Two lecture and three double 
laboratory periods. Spring Quarter. Prerequisite: Home Economics 
321 and 363. Campus II. Mrs. Blair. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 179 

SENIOR DIVISION OR GRADUATE COURSES 

461 (Sr.) 661 (Gr.). Textile and Clothing Economics. 5 hours. 
Summer Quarter. Prerequisites: Economics 5, Home Economics 362 or 
equivalent. Campus II. Miss Hicks. 

463 (Sr.) 663 (Gr.). Historic Costume. 5 hours. "Winter Quarter. 
Prerequisites: Home Economics 321 and one other approved Senior 
Division course. Campus II. Mrs. Blair. 

464 (Sr.) 664 (Gr.). Advanced Clothing. 5 hours. Summer Quar- 
ter. Prerequisites: Home Economics 321 and 363 or one other ap- 
proved Senior Division course in clothing. Campus II. Mrs. Blair. 

ADMINISTRATION 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

343. Fundamentals of Household Equipment. 3 hours. One lecture 
and two laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Physics 20. Winter Quarter. 
Campus II. Mrs. Hood. 

368. Home Management. 3 hours. Three lectures. Fall, Winter, 
Spring, and Summer Quarters. Prerequisites: Home Economics 306, 
351. Campus II. Mrs. Moon and Mrs. Hood. 

369. Home Management. 3 hours. Informal laboratory consisting 
of full quarter's residence in a home management house. Must ac- 
company Home Economics 368 in all cases where the curriculum re- 
quires residence. Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer Quarters. Mrs. 
Moon, Mrs. Hood, and Miss McRae. 

371. Institutional Buying. 3 hours. Fall Quarter. Campus II. 
Mrs. Alexander. 

372. Institutional Management. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. Pre- 
requisite: Home Economics 343 or 446. Campus II. Mrs. Alexander. 

375. Home Planning and Fuenishing. 5 hours. Winter and Spring 
Quarters. Prerequisite: Art 30. Campus II. Miss Creswell. 

SENIOR DIVISION OR GRADUATE COURSES 

446 (Sr.) 64 6(Gr.). Equipment Testing. 5 hours. Prerequisite: 
Home Economics 368-369 or equivalent, Physics 20. Campus II. Mrs. 
Hood. 

446 (Sr.) 646 (Gr.). Equipment Testing. 5 hours. Prerequisite: 
Home Economics 368-369. Summer Quarter. Campus II. Mrs. Moon. 

480 (Sr.) 680 (Gr.). Housing. 5 hours. Summer Quarter. Prere- 
quisites: Home Economics 368-369 and 375 or equivalent. Campus II. 
Miss Creswell. 



180 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

FAMILY LIFE 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

391. Child Care and Training. 5 hours. Three lectures, informal 
laboratory. Spring Quarter. Prerequisite: Home Economics 490. 
Campus II. Miss McPhaul. 

393. Family Relations. 5 hours. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quar- 
ters. Campus II. Miss Creswell and Mrs. Moon. 

SENIOR DIVISION OR GRADUATE COURSES 

490 (Sr.) 690 (Gr.). Development of the Young Child. 5 hours. 
Three lecture periods and supervised observation in the Nursery- 
School. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Fall, Winter, Spring, 
and Summer Quarters. Campus II. Miss Young and Miss McPhaul. 

493 (Sr.) 693 (Gr.). Social and Economic Problems of the Family. 
5 hours. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Summer Quarter. 
Campus II. Miss Creswell. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

892. Behavior Problems in Children. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Home 
Economics 490. Campus II. Miss Young. 

HORTICULTURE 

JUNIOR DIVISION COURSES 

1. General Horticulture. 5 hours. Fall, Winter, and Spring 
Quarters. Campus II. Mr. Keener. 

A survey of the horticultural practices in plant propagation, vegeta- 
ble gardening and fruit growing particularly adapted to the farm. 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

309. Systematic Pomology. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Prerequisite: 
Horticulture 1. Campus II. Mr. McHatton. 

A study of the history, classification and adaptability of fruit va- 
rieties. 

310. Greenhouse Construction and Management. 5 hours. Winter 
Quarter. Prerequisite: Horticulture 1. Campus II. Mr. McHatton 
and Greenhouse Staff. 

Special emphasis is placed upon the construction and management 
of greenhouses, attention being given to economical planning and ar- 
rangement of such structures. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 181 

311. Floral Design. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. Prerequisite: Horti- 
culture 1. Campus II. Mr. McHatton and Greenhouse Staff. 

The design of bouquets, table decorations, wedding decorations of 
churches and homes, as well as floral designs for funerals. 

353. Sprays and Spraying. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Prerequisite: 
Horticulture 1. Campus II. Mr. McHatton. 

A study of the chemistry, preparation and application of sprays to 
various horticultural crops, special attention being given to the eco- 
nomical and practical end of the work. 

355. Horticultural and Agricultural Entomology. 5 hours. Fall, 
Winter, and Spring Quarters. Campus II. Mr. McHatton. 

Emphasis in this course is placed upon the identification, life his- 
tory and control of economic insects as applied to horticulture and agri- 
culture. 

362. Nursery Production and Management. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. 
Prerequisite: Horticulture 1. Campus II. Mr. Keener. 

Economical and practical methods of plant propagation receive atten- 
tion as well as culture, protection and management of nursery prop- 
erties. 

363. Horticultural Manufacturing. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Cam- 
pus II. Mr. Davis. 

The study of fundamental principles underlying canning and pre- 
serving, special emphasis being placed upon the community cannery. 



SENIOR DIVISION OR GRADUATE COURSES 

401 (Sr.) 601 (Gr.). The Fundamentals of Fruit Production. 5 
hours. Winter Quarter. Prerequisite: Horticulture 1 and 353. When 
combined with 602, a minor. Campus II. Mr. McHatton. 

This course deals with the biological and chemical principles of 
plant life as directly applied to the economic production of fruit crops. 

402 (Sr.) 602 (Gr.). Pomological Crops. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. 
Prerequisite: Horticulture 401 or 601. Campus II. Mr. McHatton. 

A careful and intensive study is made of the major pomological crops 
of the South and the Nation as a whole. The course is designed to 
acquaint the student with the present practices followed throughout 
the country in commercial fruit growing. An undergraduate thesis is 
required in connection with this course. 

403 (Sr.) 603 (Gr.). Vegetable Production. 5 hours. Winter Quar- 
ter. Prerequisite: Horticulture 1 and 353. When combined with 
604, a minor. Campus II. Mr. Keener. 

The basis of this course is a study of the fundamental, biological 
and scientific principles underlying vegetable production. 

404 (Sr.) 604 (Gr.). Advanced Vegetable Crops. 5 hours. Spring 
Quarter. Prerequisite: Horticulture 403 or 603. Campus II. Mr. 
Keener. 



1>; THE UXIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

a Doatmuatkui of conrse 403. dealing mainly with the comniercial 

ticec ..: this time being followed in vegetable growing, special 
emphj..-.:- bein£ r .ven to the major vegetable crops. 

I £ (Si 5 (,Gr.'». Feoricultural Production. 5 hours. Winter 

Quarter. Prerequisite: Horticulture 1 and 353. When combined with 
606, a minor. Campus II. Mr. McB . torn and Greenhouse $:.: 

A --...:.. .: modern methods in producing flowers out of doors and 
unier ^lass 

Sr.) 606 cGr.). Business Maxagilmum of Greenhouses. 5 
hours. Spring Quarter. Prerequisite: Horticulture 405 and 605. 
Campus II. Mr. MeHatton and Greenho:..- : 

A --:udy of the souses ;: sapf '.;■ Eoi greenhouse accessories, flowers 
and ornamental greenhouse plants Tiie bookkeeping, marketing and 
r ~t„rral financial and economic management of greenhouses receive 
;::::-: attention. 

107-401 Sr 697-COI Si Sojombb Practicum in Horticulture. 
10 hours. Open to Senior Division students or those having equivalent 
preparation. Summer Quarter. Campus II. Mr. MeHatton, Mr. Keener, 
and Eorti: . - tH 

A ;:...-..... bc in Horticulture, the special interest of the indi- 

vidni. sfwlenl eins sonsMered. This course requires continual work 
with horticultural crops. 

409 (.Sr.) 609 (Gr.). Home Canning and Preserving. 5 hours. 
Fall Quarter. Prerequisites: Bacteriology 350 and Organic Chemistry 
346. Campus II. Mr. Davis. 

Fundamental principles and practices of canning and preserving. 
Knpccfally ifsirnri for home economics teachers, students and home 
demonstration ~ren:s 

410 (Sr.) 610 (Gr.). Fundamentals of Canning. 5 hours. Spring 
Quarter. Prerequisite: Bacteriology 350. Additional requirements 
for graduate credit: Bacteriology 351 and Chemistry 340. When com- 
bined with 611, a minor. Campus II. Mr. Davis. 

An introduction to the field of food preservation with emphasis on 
::r scientific principles of canning. 

411 Sr. til (Gr.). Food Products Manufacture. 5 hours. Fall 
Quarter. Prerequisite: Horticulture 410 or 610. Campus II. Mr. 
Devil 

Principles and practices of commercial canning, pickling and pre- 

412 Canning- Operation and Management. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. 
P iemqnnri tg Horticulture 411. Campus II. Mr. Davis. 

A study of the economic phases of the canning plant, including con- 
struction, equipment, management and technical laboratory control. 

-.'. I Frozen and Dehydrated Foods. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. 
PrereqciBibe Bacteriology 350. Campus II. Mr. Davis. 



GENERAL IX FORMATION T83 

Principles and methods of preserving foods by freezing and dehy- 
dration. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

(Note: Prerequisite to all graduate courses are Horticulture 1, 
353, and a sequence to two 400 or 600 courses in Horticulture). 

802-803. Advanced Pomology. Campus II. Mr. McHatton. 

This course is based upon an undergraduate degree majoring in 
Horticulture and deals with the evolution, history and classification 
of pomological crops. 

804-805. Advanced Vegetable Production. Campus II. Mr. Keener. 

This course is based upon an undergraduate degree majoring in 

Horticulture and deals with the evolutoin, history and classification 
of vegetable crops. 

806-807. Advanced Floral Production. Campus II. Mr. McHatton. 

This course is based upon an undergraduate degree majoring in 
Horticulture and deals with the evolution, history and classification of 
floral crops. 

808. Horticultural Research. Thesis. Campus II. Mr. McHatton, 
Mr. Keener, and Mr. Davis. 

A thesis on some horticultural subject selected with reference to 
student's interest is required of all post-graduate students majoring 
in Horticulture. 

HUMANITIES SURVEY 

1 a-b-c. Humanities Survey. 9 hours. (Three hours per quarter.) 
Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Campuses I and III. 

This course will include material from English literature, ancient 
and modern foreign literatures, and the fine arts, such as music, 
painting, sculpture, and architecture. It is designed to develop in 
the student some knowledge and an appreciation of these vital factors 
in life. 

JOURNALISM 

JUNIOR DIVISION" COURSES 

1. Introduction to Journalistic Writing. 5 hours. Spring Quar- 
ter. Campuses I and III. Mr. Dreicry and Mr. Massey. 

20. Principles and Ethics of Journalism. 5 hours. Winter Quar- 
ter. Campuses I and III. Mr. Dreicry. 

30. History of Journalism. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Campuses I 
and III. Mr. Butler. 

40. Public Opinion and the Press. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. Cam- 
puses I and III. Mr. Butler. 



184 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

350. News Writing and Reporting (Part 1). 5 hours. Fall Quar- 
ter. Campus I. Mr. Drewry. 

351. Copy Reading, Newspaper Editing. 3 hours. Winter Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. Butler. 

352. Make-up and Typography. 3 hours. Spring Quarter. Prere- 
quisite: Journalism 350 a-b and 351. Campus I. Mr. Butler and Mr. 
Kempton. 

353. The Editorial. 3 hours. Spring Quarter. Prerequisite : 350 a-b. 
Campus I. Mr. Drewry. 

354. The Law of the Press. 3 hours. Winter Quarter. Campus I. 
Mr. Kempton. 

355 a-b. News Writing and Reporting (Part 2). 6 hours. Winter 
and Spring Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Massey. 

357. Advertising Practice. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. Campus I. 
Mr. Drewry. 

358. Feature Writing and Special Articles. 3 hours. Fall Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. Drewry and Mr. Kempton. 

360. Advanced Reporting and News Writing. 5 hours. Winter 
Quarter. Prerequisite: Journalism 350 and 355. Campus I. Mr. 
Kempton. 

361. Dramatic Criticism. 3 hours. Spring Quarter. Campus I. 
Mr. Crouse. 

362. Short Story Writing. 3 hours. Fall Quarter. Prerequisite: 
Consent of instructor. Campus I. Mr. Kempton. 

363. Advanced Fiction and Feature Writing. 3 hours. Winter 
Quarter. Prerequisite: Journalism 358 or 362. Campus I. Mr. Kemp- 
ton. 

364. Newspaper Administration. 3 hours. Fall Quarter. Campus 
I. Mr. Butler. 

366. Journalism in the Secondary School. 5 hours. Spring and 
Summer Quarters. Campus II. Mr. Kempton. 

368. Contemporary Newspaper Practice. 5 hours. Fall and Spring 
Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Kempton. 

369. The Radio in Journalism. 5 hours. Laboratory fee $1.00. 
Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Kempton. 

370. News Photography. 5 hours. Laboratory fee $2.50. Breakage 
deposit $5.00. Campus I. Mr. Kempton and Mr. Snyder. (Also offered 
as Physics 370.) 

A study of the photographic requirements of newspapers and mag- 
azines and the technique of news photography with elementary train- 
ing in the use of various cameras, developing, printing, and enlarging. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 185 



SENIOR DIVISION OR GRADUATE COURSES 

400 (Sr.) 600 (Gr.). Foreign News and the European Press. (Of- 
fered in absentia, 1940, with all class periods on shipboard or in 
Europe.) Prerequisite: Consent of Director of the School. Summer 
Quarter. Mr. Kempton. 

456 (Sr.) 656 (Gr.). The Magazine. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Cam- 
pus I. Mr. Drewry. 

459 (Sr.) 659 (Gr.). Literary Criticism. 3 hours. Winter Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. Drewry. 

467 (Sr.) 667 (Gr.). Contemporary American Newspapers. 3 hours. 
Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Kempton. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

801. History of Journalism. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Prerequisite: 
Journalism 20, 30, 40, 350, 355, 360, 351, 352. Campus I. Mr. Kempton. 

802. Public Opinion and the Press. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. 
Prerequisite: Journalism 20, 30, 40, 350, 355, 360, 351, 352. Campus I. 
Mr. Kempton. 

807-808. Advertising. Minor. Mr. Drewry. 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

JUNIOR DIVISION COURSES 

11. Elements of Architecture. 5 hours. Five laboratory periods. 
Fall Quarter. Campus I. 

A study of the orders with drawing practice. 

12. Introductory Landscape Design. 5 hours. Five lecture or lab- 
oratory periods. Prerequisite: Landscape Architecture 11. Fall and 
Winter Quarters. Campus I. 

Deals with elementary design as applied to small properties, small 
estates, civic centers and the like. 

13. Landscape Design. 3 hours. Three laboratory periods. Prere- 
quisite: Landscape Architecture 12. Fall and Spring Quarters. Cam- 
pus I. Mr. Oicens. 

Problems in advanced design, involving designing and rendering of 
plans for country estates, state parks, etc. 

14. Architectural Design. 3 hours. Three laboratory periods. No 
prerequisite. Fall Quarter. Campuses I and III. 

An abstract approach to the general field of design through archi- 
tectural principles. 

70. History of Landscape Architecture, 3 hours. Three lecture 



186 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

periods. Prerequisite: Landscape Architecture 11. Fall and Spring 
Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Owens. 

Deals with the history of gardening from Italian Renaissance to 
present time with particular attention devoted to its development in 
the South. 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

350. Construction. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Landscape Design 13. 
Winter Quarter. Campus I. 

Problems dealing with the architectural elements in landscape de- 
sign such as garden shelters, walls, steps, pools, etc. Working draw- 
ings and specifications required. 

351. Plant Materials. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. 
Owens. 

A study of plant materials used in landscape architecture, dealing 
with trees and shrubs. 

352. Plant Materials. 5 hours. Three laboratory periods. Spring 
Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Owens. 

A study of plant materials used in landscape architecture, dealing 
with flowers, perennials, and grasses. 

353 a-b. City Planning. 6 hours. Three laboratory periods. Spring 
Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Owens. 

Deals with brief history of city planning as affects modern problems 
with special attention devoted to zoning and regional planning. 

354. Planting Design. 9 hours. Five lecture or laboratory periods. 
Prerequisite: Landscape Architecture 353 a-b. Winter Quarter. Cam- 
pus I. Mr. Owens. 

Dealing with problems which aim to train the student to produce 
with plants and other landscape materials practical and aestehetically 
effective results. This study is done by means of plans, sketches, 
elevations, perspectives and is accomplished by planting estimates 
and reports. 

355. Landscape Thesis. 5 hours. Five lecture or laboratory peri- 
ods. Prerequisite: Landscape Architecture 353 a-b. Spring Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. Owens. 

A problem will be assigned the student who will be expected to 
design the property and submit completed plans and construction 
reports of the same. The hours of the course will be arranged. 

356 a-b. Landscape Design. 6 hours. Three laboratory periods with 
criticism and lectures. Prerequisite: Landscape Architecture 13. 
Fall and Winter Quarters. Campus I. 

Problems in advanced landscape design and rendering of plans for 
city and state parks, recreational areas, athletic fields and school 
grounds. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



357 a-b. Landscape Design. 6 hours. Three laboratory periods with 
criticism and lectures. Prerequisite: Landscape Architecture 356 a-b. 
Fall and Winter Quarters. Campus I. 

Problems in advanced landscape design and rendering of plans for 
residential subdivisions, community design, golf and country clubs, 
cemeteries, etc. 

360. History of Architecture. 5 hours. Four lecture and one lab- 
oratory periods. No prerequisite: Winter and Spring Quarter. Cam- 
pus I. 

Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Byzantine, Romanesque, Gothic, Renais- 
sance, Tudor, Georgian, Early American and Modern Architecture 
with special emphasis on domestic architecture and on those styles 
which have been most popular in America for residences and public 
buildings. 

370. History and Appreciation of Landscape Architecture. 5 hours. 
Five lecture periods. Especially designed as an elective for students 
not majoring in landscape architecture. Fall and Spring Quarters. 
Campus I. Mr. Owens. 

A study of the elements of landscape architecture. The course deals 
with the history of gardening with particular attention devoted to 
its development in the South, and the application of landscape design 
to outdoor areas including the small home, park, cemetery, estate, etc. 

371. Theory of Landscape Architecture. 3 hours. Three lecture 
periods. Prerequisite: Landscape Architecture 70. Theory of design 
principles as applied in landscape architecture. Winter Quarter. Cam- 
pus I. Mr. Owens. 



LATIN 

JUNIOR DIVISION COURSES 

101. Elementary Latin. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Campuses I and 
III. Mr. McWhorter. 

A beginners' course in Latin arranged for college students. The 
first half of a sequence, Latin 101-102. 

102. Intermediate Latin. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Latin 101 or one 
high school unit in Latin. Winter Quarter. Campuses I and III. 
Mr. McWhorter. 

Continuation of Latin 101. 

103. Readings in Latin. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Latin 102 or two 
high school units in Latin. Fall and Spring Quarters; Campus I. 
Spring Quarter; Campus III. Mr. Hooper and Mr. McWhorter. 

Review of forms and syntax and reading of simple selections from 
Latin authors. 



188 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

104. Readings in Latin (Continued). 5 hours. Prerequisite: Latin 
103 or the equivalent. Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Hooper and 
Mr. McWhorter. 

Continuation of Latin 103. 

105. Terence or Livy. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Latin 104 or three 
units of high school Latin. Fall and Spring Quarters. Campus I. 
Mr. Hooper and Mr. McWhorter. 

A play of Terence or the equivalent of one book of Livy will be read. 

106. Horace, Odes. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Latin 105 or the equiv- 
alent. Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Hooper. 

Selected Odes of Horace will be read. 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

305. Cicero, Essays. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Latin 106 or the equiv- 
alent. Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Hooper. 
A study of Cicero's De Officiis or of other essays. 

360 a-b-c. Horace; Silver Latin. 9 hours. (Three hours each quar- 
ter.) Prerequisite: Latin 305 or the equivalent. Fall, Winter, and 
Spring Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Hooper. 

Reading of Horace's Satires and Epistles; and of Tacitus and Pliny. 

361 a-b-c. Reading Course. 9 hours. (Three hours each quarter.) 
Prerequisite: Latin 360 a-b-c or the equivalent. Fall, Winter, and 
Spring Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Hooper. 

A course in which selections are read from a number of authors, 
illustrating the history of the literature. 

LAW 

FIRST YEAR 

Business Organizations I. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. Mr. Sellers. 

Contracts I and II. 4 hours; Fall Quarter. 5 hours; Winter Quar- 
ter. Mr. Hosch. 

Criminal Law and Procedure. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Mr. Mc- 
Whorter. 

Family Relations. 4 hours. Spring Quarter. Mr. Spruill. 

Introduction to the Study of Law and the Legal Profesion, I, 
II, and III. 1 hour; Fall Quarter. 1 hour; Winter Quarter. 1 hour; 
Spring Quarter. Mr. Hosch and Mr. Spruill. 

Pleading and Practice. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Mr. Spruill. 

Property I. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. Mr. McWhorter. 

Torts I and II. 3 hours; Winter Quarter. 4 hours; Spring Quarter. 
Mr. Shinn. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 1^39 

SECOND YEAR 

Administrative Law. 4 hours. Winter Quarter. Mr. Sellers. 
Business Organizations II. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. Mr. Spruill. 
Constitutional, Law. 4 hours. Fall Quarter. Mr. Shinn. 
Equity I and II. 5 hours; Winter Quarter. 3 hours; Spring Quar- 
ter. Mr. McWhorter. 

Essay. 1 hour. Faculty Supervision. 

Evidence. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Mr. Green. 

Georgia Practice. 4 hours. Spring Quarter. Mr. Bradwell. 

Insurance. 3 hours. Winter Quarter. Mr. Green. 

Legal Accounting. 3 hours. Winter Quarter. Mr. Heckman. 

Negotiable Instruments. 4 hours. Spring Quarter. Mr. Green. 

Property II. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Mr. McWhorter. 

Public Corporations. 3 hours. Spring Quarter. Mr. Sellers. 

Sales. 3 hours. Spring Quarter. Mr. Spruill. 

THIRD YEAR 

Administrative Law. 4 hours. Winter Quarter. Mr. Sellers. 

Bankruptcy. 3 hours. Spring Quarter. Mr. Green. 

Business Organizations II. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. Mr. Spruill. 

Conflict of Laws. 4 hours. Spring Quarter. Mr. Hosch. 

Damages. 3 hours. Spring Quarter. Mr. Seller.s 

Essay. 1 hour. Faculty Supervision. 

Federal Procedure. 3 hours. Fall Quarter. Mr. Sellers. 

Government Regulation of Business. 4 hours. Fall Quarter. Mr. 
Shinn. 

Labor Law. 3 hours. Winter Quarter. Mr. Shinn. 

Practice Court. 1 hour; Fall Quarter. 1 hour; Winter Quarter. 
1 hour; Spring Quarter. Mr. Bradwell. 

Preparation and Examination of Abstracts of Title. 2 hours. 
Winter Quarter. Mr. McWhorter. 

Public Corporations. 3 hours. Spring Quarter. Mr. Sellers. 

Public Utilities. 4 hours. Fall Quarter. Mr. Sellers. 

Quasi Contracts and Equitable Relief Against Mistake. 3 hour3. 
Fall Quarter. Mr. Spruill. 

Sales. 3 hours. Spring Quarter. Mr. Spruill. 

Security Transactions. 4 hours. Winter Quarter. Mr. Green. 

Taxation. 3 hours. Fall Quarter. Mr. Green. 

Trusts and Estates I and II. 4 hours; Winter Quarter. 4 hours; 
Spring Quarter. Mr. Shinn. 



190 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

MATHEMATICS 

JUNIOR DIVISION COURSES 

1. Trigonometry and Algebra. 5 hours. Campus I. Fall, Winter, 
and Spring Quarters. Mr. Beckwith. 

An elementary course in trigonometry and algebra. 

2. Analytical Geometry. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 1 
or 20 or 30. Winter and Spring Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Beckwith 
and Mr. Hill. 

A beginning course in analytics, including the straight line, the 
circle, and conies. 

3. Calculus. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 2 or 21 or 22. 
Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Barrow and Mr. Strahan. 

A beginning course in the differential calculus with a few simple 
applications of the integral calculus. 

4. College Algebra. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. 
Strahan and Mr. Beckwith. 

This course covers the usual topics of college algebra. It is not 
open to those who have had Mathematics 1. 

/ 20. Freshman Mathematics. 5 hours. Fall, Winter, and Spring 
Quarters. Campuses I and III. Mr. Stephens, Mr. Barrow, Mr. Stra- 
han, Mr. Gumming, Mr. Beckwith, Miss Callaway, and Mr. Hill. 

A beginning course in algebra, statistics, finance, and trigonometry. 
Required of most freshmen. 

21. Trigonometry and Analytics. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 20. Winter and Spring Quarters. Campuses I and III. Mr. 
Stephens, Mr. Gumming, Mr. Hill, and Miss Callaway. 

This course takes up those parts in plane trigonometry, not cov- 
ered in Mathematics 20, and also includes analytics through the circle. 
Not open to those with credit for Mathematics 2. 

22. Analytics and Trigonometry. 5 hours. (Not offered 1940-41.) 
This course covers the same trigonometry as Mathematics 1 and 

the same analytics as Mathematics 21. It is not open to those having 
credit for Mathematics 1 or 21. 

30. Trigonometry. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Mr. Strahan. 

A course in plane trigonometry, given especially for students in 
agricultural engineering, emphasizes logarithms and numerical cal- 
culations. 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

354. Calculus. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 21 or 22 or 
2. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Barrow and Mr. Beckwith. 

This is a beginning course in calculus, but is open only to Senior 
Division students. It is not open to students who have had Mathe- 
matics 3. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 191 

355. Calculus. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 354 or 3. Win- 
ter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Barrow. 

This is a second course in the calculus, including both integral 
and differential with applications. 

356. Statistics. 5 hours. Prerequisite: One Junior College course 
in Mathematics. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Campus I. Mr. 
Barrow and Mr. dimming. 

An elementary course in statistics. 

357. Advanced Statistics. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 356. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Camming. 

This course deals more intensely with certain subjects discussed in 
Mathematics 356. It includes also curve fitting, frequency distribu- 
tions, sampling and statistical induction, partial and multiple cor- 
relation, analysis of time series, sources of material. 

361. Investment. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Same as for Mathematics 
356. Fall and Spring Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Stephens and Mr. 
Gumming. 

This course includes interest, annuities, sinking funds, insurance, 
and bonds. 

362. Analytics. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 21 or 22. 
(Not offered 1940-41.) 

This is a continuation of the analytics of Mathematics 21, review- 
ing the fundamental principles and applying these in more general 
cases. 

SENIOR DIVISION OR GRADUATE COURSES 

401 (Sr.) 601 (Gr.). Differential Equations. 5 hours. Prere- 
quisite: Mathematics 355. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Stephens 
or Mr. Barrow. 

This is a course in elementary differential equations with applica- 
tions to geometry and physics. 

402 (Sr.) 602 (Gr.). Vectob Analysis. 5 hours. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 355. (Not offered 1940-41.) 

A study of vector methods and their physical applications. 

403 (Sr.) 603 (Gr.). Projective Geometry. 5 hours. Prerequisite: 
Three to five courses in college mathematics. Spring Quarter. Campus 
I. Mr. Stephens. 

Projection and section, projectivities as applied to forms of the 
second order. 

404 (Sr.) 604 (Gr.). Theoretical Mechanics. 5 hours. Prerequi- 
sites: Mathematics 355 and Physics 331. Campus I. Mr. Stephens 
or Mr. Hendren. (Course given if demand warrants.) 

This course may count as either mathematics or physics. 

406 (Sr.) 606 (Gr.). Advanced Analytics. 5 hours. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 355. Campus I. Mr. Stephens or Mr. Barrow. (Course 
given if demand warrants.) 



192 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

This course develops a system of trilinear coordinates with applica- 
tions of analytical methods to geometrical problems. 

407 (Sr.) 607 (Gr.). Advanced Statistics. 5 hours. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 356. Winter and Spring Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Cum- 
ruing. 

This course deals with the normal curve and the coefficient of cor- 
relation. 

411 (Sr.) 611 (Gr.). Theory of Equations. 5 hours. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 355. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Barrow. 

This course covers the usual topics, such as cubic and quartic equa- 
tions, solutions of numerical equations, determinants. 

412 (Sr.) 612 (Gr.). College Geometry. 5 hours. Prerequisite: 
Three to five courses in college mathematics. Winter Quarter. Campus 
I. Mr. Barrow or Mr. Cumming. 

This is an advanced course in geometry. 

422 (Sr.) 622 (Gr.). History of Mathematics. 3 hours. Prere- 
quisite: Same as for Mathematics 412. Mr. Beckwith. 

423 (Sr.) 623 (Gr.). Famous Problems. 3 hours. Prerequisite: 
Same as for Mathematics 412. Mr. Hill. 

431 (Sr.) 631 (Gr.). Theory of Numbers. 3 hours. Prerequisite: 
Same as for Mathematics 412. Campus I. Mr. Barrow or Mr. Beck- 
with. (Course given if demand warrants.) 

This course will take up the usual topics of an elementary course 
in the theory of numbers. 

435 (Sr.) 635 (Gr.). Fourier's Series. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Mathe- 
mathematics 355. Mr. Barrow. (Course given if demand warrants.) 

GRADUATE COURSES 

805. Theory of Functions. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 
355. Mr. Stephens. (Course given if demand warrants.) 

810 a-b. Advanced Calculus. 6 hours. Three hours per week for 
two quarters. Prerequisite: Mathematics 355. Mr. Barrow. 

Fundamental concepts and theorems found in earlier courses re- 
ceive a more rigorous treatment, and certain new topics such as 
gamma functions, line integrals, and Fourier's series are introduced. 

811. Advanced Calculus. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 810. 
Mr. Barrow. 

A continuation of Mathematics 810. 

832. Elliptic Integrals. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 355. 
Mr. Beckwith. (Course given if demand warrants.) 

The evaluation of the definite integral of elementary elliptic func- 
tions according to types. Exercises and applications. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 193 

MUSIC 
JUNIOR DIVISION COURSES 

1. Sight Singing and Dictation. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. Cam- 
pus I. Prerequisite: Music 2 or examination. 

Subject matter course. 

2. Elements and Theory of Music 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Cam- 
pus I. Mr. Hodgson. 

Training in observation of the elements of music and of musical 
form. Basic material designed for public school grade teachers who 
have had no previous training in music. 

3. Appreciation of Music One lecture recital per week. Open to 
the public. 3 hours. (One hour each quarter.) Fall, Winter, Spring, 
and Summer Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Hodgson. 

Credit given only to students taking another theoretical music 
course. 

22. History of Music 5 hours. Spring Quarter. Campus III. Mr. 
Hodgson and Miss Kimble. 

A literary course not requiring special technical skill. 

31. Elementary Harmony. Prerequisite: Ability to read music nota- 
tion. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. Campus III. Mr. McDowell and Mr. 
Hodgson. 

The grammar of music through secondary sevenths. Close and open 
harmony employed in exercises, harmonization of soprano melodies 
and compositions of original form. 

32 a-b. Advanced Harmony. Prerequisite: Music 31. 6 hours. (Three 
hours per quarter). Fall and Winter Quarters. Campus III. Mr. 
McDowell or Mr. Hodgson. 

33. Keyboard Harmony. Prerequisite: Music 32. 3 hours. Spring 
Quarter. Campus III. Miss Kimble. 

A practical application at the keyboard of music theory. 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

302. Methods of Teaching Music and Sight Singing. 5 hours. 
Fall and Spring Quarters. Campus I. 
Methods course. 

312. Public School Music for Elementary Grades. 5 hours. Winter 
and Spring Quarters. Prerequisite: Public School Music 302. Campus 
I. Miss Smith. 

313. Music in Junior and Senior High Schools. 5 hours. Fall 
and Winter Quarters. Campus I. Miss Smith. 



194 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

314-315. Supervised Teaching of Public School Music. 5 hours 
each. Prerequisite: Public School Music 312. Campus III. Miss 
Smith. 

340. Development of Opeea. 3 hours. Fall Quarter. Campus I. 
Mr. Hodgson or Mr. McDowell. 

A general literary course in appreciation of the entire field of opera. 
Illustrations from selected scores played in class. 

341. Development of Opeea. 3 hours. Winter Quarter. Campus I. 
Mr. Hodgson or Mr. McDowell. 

A continuation of Music 340. 

343. Listener's History of Music. 3 hours. Fall and Spring Quar- 
ters. Campus I. Mr. Hodgson. 

For the student untrained musically, who wishes to acquire an in- 
telligent appreciation of the Art. This course is especially designed 
in conjunction with the three-hour Art Appreciation course (Art 17) 
under Mr. Dodd. Required of all students preparing to teach in 
the public schools of the state. 

342. Wagner's Music Dramas. 3 hours. Spring Quarter. Campus 
I. Mr. Hodgson. 

A course of literary and cultural value concentrating on a detailed 
study of the plots and themes of all the Wagner operas, with scores of 
the "Ring," "Tannhauser," "Lohengrin," "Tristan and Isolde" played 
in class. 

351. Music and Literature. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. Campus 
I. Mr. Brown. 

A comparative study of the forms, relationships, and aesthetics of 
music and literature. Admission by consent of the instructor. 

353. History of Piano Literature. 3 hours. Fall Quarter. Campus 
I. Mr. Hodgson or Miss Kimble. 

356. Bach-Beethoven-Brahms. 3 hours. Winter Quarter. Campus 
I. Mr. Hodgson. 

A detailed study of the principal works of the three great com- 
posers, with their masterpieces performed in class. 

357. Beethoven Symphonies. 3 hours. Spring Quarter. Campus I. 
Mr. Hodgson and Miss Kimble. 

A detailed study of the nine symphonies of Beethoven. 

359. English Folk Song. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. 
Walker and Mr. Hodgson. 

360. Modern Music. 3 hours. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Hodg- 
son and Miss Kimble. 

A literary course illustrating modern trends in music of Schonberg, 
Stravinsky, Bartok, Scriabin, etc. 

361. Modern Music. 3 hours. Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. 
Hodgson and Miss Kimble. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 195 

A continuation of Music 360, involving more complicated modern 
trends. 

370. Analysis and Form. Prerequisite: Music 31 and 32. 5 hours. 
Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Hodgson or Mr. McDowell. 

Harmonic and Polyphonic forms analyzed. Special stress given 
Sonata form and Bach's "Well empered Clavichard." Students en- 
couraged to write originally in forms thus analyzed. 

371. Counterpoint. Prerequisite: Music 31, 32, 370. 5 hours. Win- 
ter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. McDowell. 

373. Advanced Sight Singing and Dictation. 5 hours. Spring Quar- 
ter. Campus I. Prerequisite: Music 1. 

PRACTICAL COURSES IN MUSIC 

The following courses are offered to enable the talented students, 
who wish to devote a large amount of time to practical work, to re- 
ceive a limited amount of credit. Therefore, no such credit is allowed 
on courses of this nature transferred from other institutions. The 
maximum amount of credit allowed on any degree for this work is 
20 quarter hours (only five quarter hours per year). 

Music 81. 5 hours. Two half-hour private lessons per week for 
three quarters. One and one-half hours practice per day. Laboratory 
fee course. 

Music 82. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Music 81. Laboratory fee course. 

Music 383. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Music 81 and 82. Laboratory 
fee course. 

Music 384. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Music 81, 82, and 383. 

Extra-Curricular practical courses in Piano Technique, Piano Key- 
board Harmony, and Ensemble Playing are given to students without 
fee. 

MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

JUNIOR DIVISION COURSES 

1 a-b-c-2 a-b-c. Military Science and Tactics (Cavalry-Infantry). 10 
hours. Three recitations or lecture periods and one hour practical 
drill per week for three quarters for each course. Double course. 

Two academic years. Required for all physically fit male students 
registering as freshmen or sophomores in all courses. 

These courses include: Obligations of Citizenship, Military History 
and Policy of the United States, Current International Situation, 
Military Courtesy and Discipline, Drill, Map Reading, basic training 
in weapons and minor tactics, Hygiene, Sanitation and First Aid, 
Command and Leadership. Cavalry students, in addition, study Equita- 
tion and Care of Animals. 



196 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

350 a-b-c. Advanced Military Science and Tactics (Cavalry- 
Infantry). 9 hours. Four recitation periods of one hour and one 
hour practical drill per week for three quarters. If enrolled in Ad- 
vanced ROTC, 352-353-354, are required for any degree. Prerequisite: 
Military Science 1-2 a-b-c. Deposit of $25.00 to cover cost of special 
uniform, etc. Offered beginning of first quarter only. Emoluments: 
See note following 353-354 a-b-c. 

352. Advanced Military Science and Tactics (Cavalry-Infantry). 
Six weeks attendance at a military camp. Practical application of 
subjects covered in 350 and 351. Required of all students regularly 
enrolled in ROTC Advanced Course. Emoluments: See note following 
353-354. 

353 a-b-c. Advanced Military Science and Tactics (Cavalry- 
Infantry). 9 hours. Four recitation periods and one hour practical 
drill per week for three quarters. Required for all students enrolled 
in Advanced ROTC. Prerequisite: 350-351 a-b-c. 

Military Science and Tactics 350-351 a-b-c and 353-354 a-b-c covers: 
Aerial Photography, Command and Leadership, Administration and 
Supply, Weapons, Military History, Military Law, Mechanization, Drill 
and Tactics of the Combat Arms. Cavalry students study advanced 
Equitation and Horsemanship. 

Emoluments. All students enrolled in the ROTC Advanced Course 
receive a clothing allowance of $29.00 for the first year and $7.00 for 
the second year; commutation of subsistence at the rate of 25 cents 
per day for the entire period of enrollment with the exception of the 
six weeks at camp. One camp of six weeks required at the end of 
the junior year, Advanced Course. All expenses to and from camp 
are paid. While at camp students are furnished meals free of cost 
and receive in addition thereto pay at the rate of 70 cents per day. 
Students satisfactorily completing the advanced course are offered 
commissions as second lieutenants in the Officers Reserve Corps. 
Students taking the course without commutation may, by attending 
either an R. O. T. C. or C. M. T. Camp, obtain commission in the 
Officers Reserve Corps. 

Staff: Colonel Kerr T. Riggs, Lieut. Colonel R. B. Trimble, Lieut. 
Colonel A. H. Peyton, Major Bertrand Morrow, Major James Van V. 
Shufelt, Major Arthur G. Hutchinson, Major H. R. Anderson, Tech. 
Sergeant Jasper L. Kirby, and Staff Sergeant Joseph P. Holloman. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 197 

PHARMACY 

JUNIOR DIVISION COURSES 

1-2. Arithmetic in Pharmacy. 10 hours. (Five hours per quarter). 
Fall and Winter Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Wilson. 

The study of weights and measures, calculations, involving per- 
centage solutions, dilutions and concentrations, specific gravities, and 
commercial arithmetic. 

3-4-5. Galenical Pharmacy. 18 hours (Six hours per quarter). 
Three lecture and three laboratory periods. Laboratory fee $2.50 per 
quarter. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Purdum. 

A study of the Galenical preparations of the United Statesi Pharma- 
copoeia and National Formulary including their manufacture, incom- 
patabilities, medicinal and pharmaceutical uses, etc. 

The laboratory work involves the manufacture of preparations which 
are typical of the various classes of Galenicals. Special emphasis is 
placed on laboratory technique. 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

351-352-353. The Phakmacognosy and Pharmacology (Mateia Med- 
ica) of Vegetable Drugs. 9 hours (Three hours per quarter). Fall, 
Winter, and Spring Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Wilson and Assistants. 

Note. May be given on intensive basis Fall and Winter Quarters. 
Old numbers 359-360. 

The occurrence, properties, constituents, therapeutic uses, doses, 
macroscopic identification, history, etc., of the various U. S. P. and 
N. F. vegetable drugs. 

356-357-358. The Chemistry of Inorganic Medicinal Compounds. 

These three courses are devoted to a detailed study of the inorganic 
compounds of medicinal importance. The source, composition, nomen- 
clature, physical and chemical properties of each compound is dis- 
cussed along with its principal therapeutic uses. In those cases where 
the inorganic salts owe their activity to the acid radical this com- 
ponent of the salt is emphasized. The laboratory courses which cor- 
relate the lectures and recitations consist of preparing, purifying, 
identifying, assaying, and determining the major incompatabilities of 
selected inorganic compounds recognized by the U. S. P. and N. F. 

356. The Non-Metals and Their Simpler Derivatives. 5 hours. 
Three hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Pre- 
requisites: Chemistry 21-22-23. Laboratory fee $2.50. Fall Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. Sumerford. 

357. The Compounds of the Alkali and Alkaline Earth Metals. 
5 hours. Three hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory per 
week. Prerequisite: Pharmacy 356. Laboratory fee, $2.50. Winter 
Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Sumerford. 

358. The Compounds of the Metals Other Than Alkali and Alka- 
line Earth Metals. 5 hours. Three hours of lecture and four hours 



198 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: Pharmacy 357. Laboratory fee, 
$2.50. Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Sumerford. 

361-362. Dispensing Pharmacy. 10 hours. (Five hours per quarter). 
Fall and Winter Quarters. Two lecture and three laboratory periods. 
Laboratory fee, $2.50 per quarter. Campus I. Mr. Purdum. 

The class work consists of a discussion of the problems encountered 
in the compounding of physicians' prescriptions. These problems in- 
clude reading of the prescriptions, compatabliity and order of mixing 
of the ingredients. 

The laboratory work includes the compounding of the various types 
of prescriptions, many of which have been selected from actual pre- 
scription practice. The products so prepared are then packaged, 
labeled, priced and wrapped. Individual instruction is given in the 
receipt of prescriptions over the telephone. These prescriptions are 
dictated by members of the faculty and by nearby physicians. 

The students receive further experience by working in the dispensary 
operated by the School of Pharmacy in which prescriptions are com- 
pounded for all students in the University who may be in need of 
medication. 

363-364-365. The Chemistry of Organic Medicinal Compounds. 

These three courses are devoted to a consideration of the history, 
origin, structure, and nomenclature, physical properties, and chemical 
behavior of both the naturally occurring and synthetic organic com- 
pounds of the U. S. P., N. F., and N. N. R. The relationship of struc- 
ture to physiological activity is pointed out in those cases where it 
is known to exist. The laboratory exercises which correlate the lec- 
tures consist of experiments designed to familiarize the student with 
reactions of certain typical groups as well as reactions of individual 
compounds. The identity and purity of selected compounds are de- 
termined and, where feasible, certain simpler, medicinally important 
derivatives are synthesized. 

363. The Hydrocarbons, Alkyl Halides, Alcohols, Phenols, and 
Ethers. 5 hours. Three hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory 
per week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 340 a and 340 b. Laboratory fee, 
$2.50. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Sumerford. 

364. The Acids, Esters, Salols, Aldehydes, and Ketones. 5 hours. 
Three hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Pre- 
requisite: Pharmacy 363. Laboratory fee, $2.50. Winter Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. Sumerford. 

365. The Nitrogen Derivatives, Sulfur Derivatives, Organo-Metal- 
lic Derivatives, and Medicinal Dyes. 5 hours. Three hours of lec- 
ture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: Pharmacy 
364. Laboratory fee, $2.50. Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Sumer- 
ford. 

366-367. The Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology (Materia Med- 
ica) of Vegetable and Animal Drugs. 10 hours. (Five hours each 
quarter). Winter and Spring Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Wilson. 

A continuation of 351-2-3. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 199 

368. Fungicides and Parasiticides. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. Cam- 
pus I. Mr. Purdum. 

A course dealing with, the various agents used as insecticides, fungi- 
cides, parasiticides, and rodenticides; their source or manufacture, 
use, methods of application, strength in which they should be used, 
caution to be used, symptoms of poisoning, antidotes, etc. 

PHILOSOPHY 

SENIOR DIVISION' COURSES 

304. Introduction to Philosophy. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Campus 
I. Mr. Wrighton. 

A course in the fundamentals of philosophy, the vocabulary of 
philosophy, and the relation of philosophy to science, art, literature, 
religion, and other fields of knowledge. 

305. General Ethics. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. 
Wrighton. 

A study of concrete contemporary problems in order that the stu- 
dent may be enabled to find guidance in the supreme art of living. 

307. Philosophy of Religion. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. Campus 
I. Mr. Wrighton. 

A series of classes and forms, showing the basis of faith, the 
assurance of truth, the dynamics of righteousness, the meaning and 
purpose of life, the comparison of Christianity and other religions. 

352. Moral Philosophy and the New Testament. 5 hours. Fall 
Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Wrighton. 

The similarities and differences between Greek ethics and the moral 
philosophy of the New Testament. A thorough study is made of the 
verities of the New Testament in their relation to the moral life. 
The ultimate aim of the course is to know in order to live the 
Christian life. 

356. History of Philosophy — Ancient and Medieval. 5 hours. Fall 
Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Honig. 

357. History of Philosophy — Modern. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. Honig. 

358. Modern Logic. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Honig. 
A study of the procedure of reflection, the relation of logic to 

philosophy, the purpose of logic, the art of correct thinking, induc- 
tion, deduction, the syllogism, and scientific explanation. 

SENIOR DIVISION OR GRADUATE COURSES 

401 (Sr.) 601 (Gr.). Christian Ethics and Modern Problems. 5 
hours. Spring Quarter. Campus I. Prerequisite for graduate credit: 
two Senior Division courses in philosophy. Mr. Wrighton. 

A series of discussions in which the principles of Christian ethics 
are applied to the solution of the problems of modern life. The mem- 



200 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

bers of the class are required to do reflective thinking on moral ques- 
tions vitally related to personal, community, national, and international 
life. 

402 (Sr.) 602 (Gr.). Philosophy of History. 5 hours. Spring Quar- 
ter. Campus I. Mr. Honig. 

A report on the doctrines concerning the destination of mankind, 
based on and criticizing the fundamental ideas, the principles, and 
the method of historiography. 

408 (Sr.) 608 (Gr.). Philosophy of the Christian Religion. 5 
hours. Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Wrighton. 

The creation of the Christian religion. The interpretation of the 
person of Christ. The place of Christ in universal history. 

409 (Sr.) 609 (Gr.). Literature of Ancient and Medieval Philoso- 
phy. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Honig. 

A course in the writings of some of the leading philosophers of the 
ancient and medieval periods in order to make the student more 
thoroughly acquainted with philosophical literature. 

410 (Sr.) 610 (Gr.). Literature of Modern and Contemporary 
Philosophy. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Honig. 

The course will vary from year to year as intensive work is done 
in the writings of one or more of the philosophers of the period. 

411 (Sr.) 611 (Gr.). Aesthetics (Philosophy of Art). 5 hours. 
Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Honig. 

An account of the theories of beauty and its realization by art, 
its essential character and value, the principals by which it may be 
recognized and judged, and its characteristic relation to and its ef- 
fect upon the human mind. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
(I). PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR MEN 

JUNIOR DIVISION COURSES 

40. Physical Education. 5 hours. (Three hours per week for 
three quarters.) Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Campus I. 
Mr. Lampe. 

41. Physical Education. 5 hours. (Three hours per week for 
three quarters.) Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Campus I. 
Mr Lampe. 

43. Personal Hygiene and Health. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. Cam- 
pus I. Mr. Lampe. 

44. Introduction to Physical Education. 5 hours. (Fall Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. Frost. (Open to both men and women). 

45. Methods of Teaching Physical Education. 5 hours. Spring 
Quarter. Mr. Frost. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 201 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

372. History and Principles of Physical Education. Three recita- 
tion periods per week. Winter Quarter. 3 hours credit. Campus I. 
Mrs. Soule. (Open to both men and women). 

History, trends, and current problems as a basis for understanding 
the modern principles of health, physical education, and recreation. 

380. Theory of Football Coaching. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Cam- 
pus I. Physical Education Staff. 

381. Theory of Basketball Coaching. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. Lampe. 

382. Theory of Coaching Track and Field. 3 hours. Spring Quar- 
ter Campus I. Physical Education Staff. 

383. Advanced Hygiene and Sanitation. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. Lampe. 

384. Playground Management and Community Recreation. 3 hours. 
Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Frost. (Open to both men and wo- 
men). 

385. Advanced First Aid and Safety Methods. 5 hours. Spring 
Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Lampe. 

386. History and Principles of Physical Education. 5 hours. Win- 
ter Quarter. Campus I. 

387. Organization and Administration of Physical Education. 5 
hours. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Frost and Mr. Lampe. 

388. Administration of Intramural Athletics and Group Activities. 
5 hours. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Frost. 

389. Preventive and Corrective Physical Education. 5 hours. Spring 
Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Frost. 

(II). PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR WOMEN 

JUNIOR DIVISION COURSES 

1. Physical Education. 5 hours. (Three hours per week for three 
quarters.) Required of all freshman women. Campus III. Staff. 

Orientation course including fundamentals, dancing and sports. 
Lectures and conferences dealing with the various factors which affect 
the health and efficiency of the student. 

2. Physical Education. 5 hours. (Three hours per week for three 
quarters.) Required of all sophomore women. Campuses II and III. 
Staff. 

An effort is made to encourage students to experience a variety of 
activities so as to obtain a fundamental knowledge of as many leisure 
time activities as possible. Activities offered are: Fall Quarter — 
dancing, archery, golf, field hockey, horsemanship, soccer, swimming, 



202 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

and tennis; Winter Quarter — basketball, diving, dancing, fencing, 
horsemanship, riflery, speedball, swimming; Spring Quarter — baseball, 
dancing, diving, fencing, golf, swimming, and tennis. 

7. Nature and Function of Play. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Sopho- 
more rating. Winter Quarter. Campus III. Miss Reynolds. 

Historical and philosophical analysis of play; a study of the nature 
and needs of children mentally, physically and socially in grades one 
through six; study, demonstration and practice in methods of teaching 
story plays, games of low and high organization, stunts, and self-test- 
ing activities. 

18. Recreational Leadership. 3 recitation periods per week. 3 
hours credit. Prerequisite: Sophomore rating. Spring Quarter. Cam- 
pus III. 

Activities and programs adaptable to playgrounds and community 
recreation. Evaluation of playground equipment and facilities. Char- 
acteristics of leadership. 

19. Safety Education and First Aid. 3 recitation periods per week. 
3 hours credit. Fall Quarter. Campus III. Miss Keaster. 

Procedures for accident prevention in physical education activities. 
First Aid — preparation for the Red Cross First Aid Certificates. 

44. Introduction to Physical Education. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. Frost. (Open to both men and women). 



SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

307. Curriculum in Physical Education in the Elementary School. 
5 hours. Fall Quarter. Campus II. Physical Education Staff. 

Study, demonstration and practice in activities for grades one 
through six including story plays, games, singing play and rhythms. 
Observation in Laboratory School. 

311. Folk Dancing. 3 hours. Spring Quarter. Campus II. Miss 
Clague. 

Basic folk dance steps. Dances suitable to various age levels. Re- 
lated studies in folkways, customs and costumes, adapted to unit 
study and assembly hours. 

315. Swimming. 3 hours. Fall and Winter Quarters. Campus II. 
Miss Keaster. 

Instruction and practice in the pool for beginning and intermediate 
swimmers. 

316. Swimming and Diving. 3 hours. Winter and Spring Quarters. 
Campus II. Miss Keaster. 

Instruction and practice in the pool for intermediate and advanced 
swimmers. Spring board diving, American Red Cross Life Saving 
Instruction and test for certificates. 

352. Curriculum in Physical Education. One recitation and two 
double laboratory periods per week. 3 hours credit. Fall Quarter. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 203 

Prerequisite: Elementary courses in activities. Campus II. Miss 
Reynolds. 

History, technique of skills, methods of coaching and officiating, 
demonstration and practice in field hockey, soccer, speedball. 

353. Curriculum ix Physical Education. 3 hours. Winter Quar- 
ter. Prerequisite: Physical Education 352, or permission of instruc- 
tor. Campus II. Miss Clague. 

History, techniques of skills, methods of coaching and officiating, 
demonstration and practice in basketball, volley ball, and recreational 
activities. Instruction and tests toward Official Basketball Ratings. 

357. Modern Dance. 3 hours. Fall and Winter Quarters. Campus 
II. Miss Priest. 

Dance technique, movement analysis, individual and group experi- 
mentation with movement leading to elementary forms of dance com- 
position. Lecture periods on philosophy, history and personages of 
the modern dance. 

358. Modern Dance. One recitation and two laboratory periods per 
week. 3 hours credit. Winter and Spring Quarters. Prerequisite: 
Physical Education 357. Campus II. Miss Priest. 

More advanced movement techniques, and a wider variety of ap- 
proaches to dance composition. 

359. History of the Dance. Three recitations per week. 3 hours 
credit. Prerequisite: Physical Education 311, 357, 358. Fall Quar- 
ter. Campus II. Miss Priest. 

Philosophy and history of the dance, stressing its relationship to 
the different types of societies in each period, and its relationship to 
the histoiy of the other arts, particularly music and drama. 

360. Kinesiology. Five lecture periods per week. 5 hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Zoology 309 and 367. Winter Quarter. Campus II. Miss 
Reynolds. 

A scientific study of joint and muscular mechanisms and their 
relation to bodily movement; analysis of representative physical edu- 
cation activities and corrective exercises. 

361. Corrective Physical Education. Five class periods per week. 
5 hours credit. Prerequisite: Physical Education 360. Spring Quar- 
ter. Campus II. Miss Reynolds. 

Study of types, causes, and treatment of faulty anterior — posterior 
and lateral deviations and abnormal foot conditions. Analysis of ex- 
ercises for prevention or correction of defects. Technique of physical 
examinations. Organization and administration of corrective physical 
education. Massage. Visit to Warm Springs, Georgia. 

370. Personal and Community Hygiene. Three recitations per week. 
3 hours credit. Fall Quarter. Campus II. Mrs. Soule. 

Personal hygiene applied; group and community hygiene; consid- 
eration of current problems and health values. 



204 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

371. Curriculum in Health Education. Three periods per week. 
3 hours credit. Winter Quarter. Prerequisite: Physical Education 
370. Campus II. Mrs. Soule and Staff. 

Principles underlying the school health program. Discussions and 
procedures concerning health instruction, health service and health- 
ful living in an integrated school program. 

366 a. Curriculum in Physical Education. 3 hours. Winter Quar- 
ter. Campus II. Physical Education Staff. 

Methods and materials in activities for high school girls. 

366 b. Curriculum in Physical Education. One lecture and two 
double laboratory periods per week. 3 hours credit. Prerequisite: 
Physical Education 357, 358 or special permission. Fall Quarter. 
Campus II. Physical Education Staff. 

Principles and objectives for the dance in education; construction 
of units and courses; collection of materials and adaptation accord- 
ing to age level; principles of progression; analysis of teaching use 
of music in relation to the dance; bibliography. 

368. Organization and Administration of Athletiic Programs for 
Girls of the Secondary School Age. Three recitation periods per 
week. 3 hours credit. Spring Quarter. Prerequisite: Physical Edu- 
cation 352-353. Campus II. Mrs. Soule and Staff. 

Consideration of the organization of athletics for high school girls; 
methods of conducting intramural programs, and girls' athletic asso- 
ciations; discussions of modern policies and trends in girls' activities. 

372. History and Principles of Physical Education. Three recita- 
tion periods per week. 3 hours credit. Winter Quarter. Campus I. 
Mrs. Soule. (Open to both men and women). 

History, trends, and current problems as a basis for understanding 
the modern principles of health, physical education, and recreation. 

376. Organization and Administration of Health and Physical 
Education. Five recitation periods per week. 5 hours credit. Prere- 
quisite: Physical Education 372. Spring Quarter. Campus II. Mrs. 
Soule and Staff. 

Consideration of the health and physical education problems and 
policies in elementary and secondary schools; study of procedures and 
methods of administration of both plant and program; field trips. 

381. Curriculum in Physical Education. Three recitation and two 
double laboratory periods per week. 5 hours credit. Prerequisite: 
Physical Education 352-353. Spring Quarter. Campus II. Physical 
Education Staff. 

Use of taste and measurements in physical education. History, 
technique of skills, methods of coaching and officiating, demonstra- 
tion and practice in swimming, tennis, and archery. 

326-327-328. Supervised Teaching in Physical Education. Three 
double periods per week. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. 3 hours 
credit. Campuses I and III. Staff. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 205 

Observation and supervised teaching in demonstration school, pub- 
lic schools, and in freshman and sophomore service courses. 

384. Playground Management and Community Receeation. 3 hours. 
Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Frost. (Open to both men and wo- 
men). 

Hoeseback Riding. 3 hours per week. Offered each quarter. Cam- 
pus II. (Non-credit). Fee of $5.00 per quarter. 

Includes saddling, the aides, gaits, change of direction, suppling 
exercises, riding without stirrups, jumping and cross-country riding. 
Written permission from parents or guardian. Physician's certificate 
required. 

PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY 

JUNIOR DIVISION COURSES 

Physical Science 1-2. The Department of Physics and Astronomy 
cooperates with the Departments of Chemistry, Geology, and Geography 
in the giving of these courses. As a general rule, the Department of 
Physics and Astronomy gives the first course and the Departments of 
Chemistry, Geology, and Geography give the second course. 

20. Physics Suevey. 5 hours. Four class and one laboratory 
period. Laboratory fee $2.50. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters; 
Campus I. Winter and Spring Quarters; Campus III. Not open to 
students who have credit for Physical Science . Mr. Dixon. Mr. 
Snyder, Mr. Henry, and Mr. Beckerley. 

An elementary survey of the development of physics, with a study 
of some of the simpler applications of physics. The laboratory work 
will be devoted to measurements designed to give an introduction in 
laboratory methods. 

25. Geneeal Physics — Mechanics, Heat, and Sound. 5 hous. Four 
class and one laboratory period. Laboratory fee $2.50. Prerequisite: 
Physical Science I or Physics 20, or one unit in high school physics 
validated by an examination given by the Physics Department. Fall 
and Winter Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Dixon, Mr. Snyder, Mr. Henry. 
and Mr. Beckerley. 

The first half of a two-course sequence in general college physics. 

26. Geneeal Physics — Electeicity and Light. 5 hours. Three class 
and two laboratory periods. Laboratory fee $2.50. Prerequisite: 
Physics 25, or by special permission, Physical Science I or Physics 20 
or one unit in high schol physics validated by an examination given 
by the Physics Department. Winter and Spring Quarters. Campus I. 
Mr. Dixon, Mr. Snyder, Mr. Henry, and Mr. Beckerley. 

The second half of a two-course sequence in general college physics. 

27. Geneeal College Physics — Mechanics. 5 hours. Four class 
and one laboratory period. Laboratory fee $2.50. Prerequisite: 



206 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Physics 20 or its equivalent. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Dixon, 
Mr. Snyder, Mr. Henry, and Mr. Beckerley. 

The first third of a three-course sequence in general college physics. 
This course is designed primarily for engineering students and all 
other students who are planning to major in physics or to take three 
courses beyond Physics 20. 

28. General College Physics — Heat, Light, and Sound. 5 hours. 
Four class and one laboratory period. Laboratory fee $2.50. Prere- 
quisite: Physics 20 or its equivalent, and it is recommended that 
Physics 27 precede this course. Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. 
Dixon, Mr. Snyder, Mr. Henry, and Mr. Beckerley. 

The second third of a three-course sequence in general college physics. 

29. General College Physics — Electricity and Magnetism. 5 hours. 
Four class and one laboratory period. Laboratory fee $2.50. Prere- 
quisite: Physics 20 or its equivalent and it is recommended that 
Physics 27 and 28 precede this course. Spring Quarter. Campus I. 
Mr. Dixon, Mr. Snyder, Mr. Henry, and Mr. Beckerley. 

The third third of a three-course sequence in general college physics. 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

331. Mechanics. 5 hours. Four class and one laboratory periods. 
Fee $2.50. Prerequisite: Mathematics 3 and Physics 25. Fall Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. Henry. 

An intermediate course in technical mechanics for those who de- 
sire a thorough quantitative foundation. This course includes linear 
and plane kinematics of a mass point, statics of a particle, linear and 
plane dynamics, work and energy, special dynamics of a mass point, 
dynamics of a system of particles., statics of rigid bodies, and plane 
and special rigid body motions. 

332. Experimental Electricity. 5 hours. Three class and two lab- 
oratory periods. Fee $2.50. Prerequisite: Physics 26. Fall and 
Winter Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Dixon. 

A course of intermediate grade in electricity, electrical measure- 
ments, and electromagnetic waves (radio). When one has satisfactor- 
ily completed this course, he will have a good foundation for work in 
radio or in general electrical engineering. No calculus is required. 

333. Sound and Light. 5 hours. Three class and two laboratory 
periods. Fee $2.50. Prerequisite: Physics 26. Winter Quarter. Cam- 
pus I. Mr. Snyder. 

An intermediate course stressing experimental work on reflection, 
refraction, interference, diffraction, and polarization of light with 
some experiments on wave motion. It includes also an introduction 
to the quantum theory of light and some experiments on spectroscopy. 
No calculus is required. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 207 

334. Heat and Kinetic Theory of Gases. 5 hours. Four class and 
one laboratory periods. Fee $2.50. Prerequisite: Physics 25. Spring 
Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Snyder. 

An intermediate course in heat and kinetic theory, with emphasis 
on quantitative experiments of the well-known heat relations, such as 
specific heat, heat of combustion, mechanical equivalent of heat, and 
thermal conductivity. 

370. Principles of Photography. 5 hours. Two class and three 
laboratory periods. (The two class periods will be given by the 
School of Journalism and the three laboratory periods will be given 
by the Physics Department). Laboratory fee ?2.50. Breakage de- 
posit $5.00. Prerequisite: Physical Science 1, Physics 20 or its equiv- 
alent. Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Snyder and Mr. Kernpton. 

An elementary approach to the problems of cameras, exposures, 
developing, contact printing, enlargements, and some introduction to 
color photography; also a study of the photographic requirements of 
newspapers and magazines. 

391. Descriptive Astronomy. 5 hours. Four class and one double 
laboratory, or observing, periods. Laboratory fee $2.50. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 20 (or its equivalent) and Physical Science 1 or Physics 
20. Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Dixon. 

The laboratory and observing work of this course includes a series 
of star maps, observations with a three inch equatorial telescope, 
and measurements of latitude and longitude with a sextant. 

SENIOR DIVISION OR GRADUATE COURSES 

404 (Sr.) 604 (Gr.). Theoretical Mechanics. 5 hours. Prerequi- 
site: Physics 331 and Mathematics 355 (Differential and Integral Cal- 
culus.) Offered any quarter upon the request of three qualified stu- 
dents. Campus I. Mr. Hendren. 

The material presented includes advanced fundamental concepts, 
rectilinear motion of a particle, curvilinear motion in a plane, par- 
ticle dynamics from the point of view of energy, statics of a particle, 
statics of a rigid body, and the dynamics of a rigid body. An attempt 
is made to emphasize the fundamental importance of mechanical prin- 
ciples in their application to all the fields of physics. 

405 (Sr.) 605 (Gr.) Theoretical Mechanics. 5 hours. Prerequisite: 
Physics 404 or 604. Offered any quarter upon the request of three 
qualified students. Campus I. Mr. Hendren. 

Constrained motion, oscillations, motion of aggregates of particles, 
deformable bodies and wave motion, and the mechanics of fluids. 

471 (Sr.) 671 (Gr.). Advanced Electricity and Magnetism... 5 hours. 
Four class and one laboratory periods. Laboratory fee $2.50. Prere- 
quisite: Physics 332 and Mathematics 3. Winter Quarter. Campus I. 
Mr. Dixon. 

This is a course designed to give the student an introduction to 



208 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

the science of electricity and magnetism in its theoretical and experi 
mental aspects. 

472 (Sr.) 672 (Gr.). Atomic Structure. 5 hours. Four class and 
one laboratory periods. Laboratory fee $2.50. Prerequisite: Physics 
471 or 671 and Mathematics 355 as a parallel course if not previously 
taken. Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Hendren and Mr. Dixon. 

This course is designed to introduce the student to the structure 
of atoms as it has been inferred from a study of experimental data 
on natural radioactivity, induced radioactivity, electromagnetic, radia- 
tions, and ionization. 

481 (Sr.) 681 (Gr.). Advanced Light. 5 hours. Four class and one 
laboratory periods. Fee $2.50. Prerequisite: Physics 333 and Mathe- 
matics 355. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Snyder. 

This is an advanced development of the wave theory of light, with 
an introduction to the Old Quantum Theory and the New Wave 
Mechanics as applied to spectral analysis. The main emphasis of 
this course is on spectroscopy studying the experimental and theo- 
retical results in this field. Project work in experimental spectro- 
scopy is included. 

PLANT PATHOLOGY AND PLANT BREEDING 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

353. Elementary Plant Pathology. 5 hours. Three lecture and 
two double laboratory periods. Laboratory fee $2.50. Prerequisite: 
Botany 1-2. Fall or Spring Quarter. Campus II. Mr. Miller or Mr. 
Thompson. 

A general introduction to the diseases of plants. Twenty types will 
be studied in field and laboratory. 

354. Forest Pathology. 5 hours. Three lecture and two double 
laboratory periods. Laboratory fee $2.50. Prerequisite: Botany 1-2. 
Fall, Winter, or Spring Quarter. Campus II. Mr. Thompson. 

This course will be similar to 353, but will differ in the use of 
types causing death or decay of trees. Methods of control suitable 
to both forest and city conditions will be studied. 

356. Diseases of Field Crops. 5 hours. Three lectures and two 
double laboratory periods. Laboratory fee $2.50. Prerequisite: Botany 
1-2 and Plant Pathology 353. Winter Quarter. Campus II. Mr. Miller. 
(Given when demand warrants). 

A course designed to meet the needs of students in Plant Pathology 
and Agronomy. 

357. Diseases of Horticultural Crops. 5 hours. Three lecture and 
two double laboratory periods. Laboratory fee $2.50. Prerequisite: 
Plant Pathology 353. Fall Quarter. Campus II. Mr. Miller. (Given 
when demand warrants). 



GENERAL INFORMATION 209 

A study of the more important diseases of fruits, vegetables, and 
ornamentals. 

358. Principles of Breeding. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Botany 1-2 
or Zoology 21-22. Fall or Winter Quarter. Campus II. Mr. Miller. 

An introductory course in agricultural genetics designed to acquaint 
the student with principles of heredity and variation and their applica- 
tion to breeding. 

SENIOR DIVISION OR GRADUATE COURSES 

401 (Sr.) 601 (Gr.). Plant Genetics. 5 hours. Three lecture and 
two double laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Plant Pathology 358. 
Spring Quarter. Campus II. Mr. Miller. 

Advanced studies in inheritance of plants, including the genetics of 
sterility and disease resistance, and principles of plant improvement. 

420-421 (Sr.) 620-621 (Gr.). Advanced Plant Pathology. 5 hours 
each. Three lecture and two double laboratory periods. Double course. 
Laboratory fee $2.50 each quarter. Prerequisite: Plant Pathology 
353 and 358. Fall and Winter Quarters. Campus II. Mr. Miller and 
Mr. Thompson. 

A study of the fungi that cause plant disease, including isolation, 
technique of cultural methods and infection. Designed especially for 
students majoring in Plant Pathology. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

800-801. Research in Plant Pathology. Prerequisite: Plant Pathol- 
ogy 353, 420, 421. Campus II. Mr. Miller. 

This course involves the prosecution of a problem in plant disease 
with parallel reading and conferences with the instructor. 

810-811. Research in Plant Genetics. Prerequisite: Plant Pathology 
358, 401. Campus II. Mr. Miller. 

This consists of a breeding problem with field studies, appropriate 
reading and conferences. 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

JUNIOR DIVISION COURSES 

60. General Poultry. 5 hours. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. 
Campus II. Mr. Bell. 

An introductory course to the field of Poultry Husbandry, includ- 
ing the study of the industry and different phases of management. 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

361. Utility Judging and Management of Layers. 5 hours. Fall 
Quarter. Campus II. Mr. Bell. 

Study of utility judging and management of the laying hen. 



210 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

362. Poultry Breeding, Incubation and Brooding. 5 hours. Winter 
Quarter. Campus II. Poultry Husbandry Staff. 

The principles and practices of poultry breeding, incubation, and 
brooding. 

363. Poultry Feeding and Marketing. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. 
Prerequisite: Poultry Husbandry 60. Mr. Bell. 

Study of poultry feedstuffs and development of rations and methods 
of feeding. Processing of poultry products and practices of market- 
ing. 

364. Poultry Management. 5 hours. Winter and Spring Quarters. 
Prerequisite: Poultry 60, 362, 363. Poultry Husbandry Staff. 

Offered only to students majoring in Poultry Husbandry. A study 
of common diseases and parasites of poultry. Analyzing farm manage- 
ment practices, including a study of hatchery management. 

365. Seminar and Project. 5 hours. Fall, Winter, and Spring 
Quarters. Prerequisite: Poultry 60, 362, and 363. Campus II. Poul- 
try Husbandry Staff. 

The student is permitted to select his field of endeavor and is as- 
signed a definite project which he must carry through to completion. 
A thesis is required. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

801-802-803-804. Research in Poultry Husbandry. 20 hours. Of- 
fered as a minor or double minor. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. 
Campus II. Poultry Husbandry Staff. 

Research problems are developed to fit the individual needs and are 
dependent upon materials that can be used. 

805. Thesis. 5 hours. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Prere- 
quisite: Poultry Husbandry 801, 802, 803, and 804. Campus II. Poul- 
try Husbandry Staff. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

All courses in the Psychology Department are in the Biological 
Science Division except Psychology 1 and Psychology 372 which are 
in the Social Science Division. 



JUNIOR DIVISION COURSES 

1. Elementary Psychology. 5 hours. Fall, Winter, and Spring 
Quarters. This course is prerequisite to all other courses in psychol- 
ogy. Campuses I and III. Mr. Edwards, Miss Young, and Miss Zeigler. 

A beginning course in psychology, given without laboratory experi- 
ments. It includes the fundamental facts and laws of psychology 
and indicates something of the various problems and fields of psy- 
chology, its relation to other fields, and some of the more important 
applications of psychology. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 211 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

322. Experimental Psychology. 5 hours. Three or four periods 
per week for discussion, demonstration, and lecture, and two double 
laboratory periods. Fee $2.50. Prerequisite: Psychology 1. Fall, 
Winter, and Spring Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Edwards and Miss 
Young. 

Typical and fundamental experiments in psychology for the pur- 
pose of giving the student first hand acquaintance with facts and laws 
of psychology and to offer training in scientific thinking. 

323. Abnormal Psychology. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Psychology 1. 
Fall and Spring Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Edwards and Miss Young. 

The study of abnormal manifestations and problems of mental dis- 
ease, together with some of the methods of psychological and psychi- 
atrical examination. The course deals with problems of normality, 
variability, individual differences, and human adjustments. It is 
planned especially for students who are going into social, educational, 
clinical, and remedial work, emphasis being placed upon mental hy- 
giene in all phases of the course. 

358. The Psychology of Adjustment. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. 
Campus I. Mr. Edwards. 

A course in mental hygiene; application to personal adjustments, 
solutions of conflicts, fears, personality difficulties; development of 
character and personality. 

371. Apt-lied Psychology. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Psychology 1. 
Fall Quarter. Campus I. Miss Zeigler. 

372. Psychological Problems. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Psychology 1. 
Winter Quarter. Campus I. Miss Zeigler. 

This course provides for a systematic treatment, largely from a 
theoretical point of view, of some problem or problems of psychology, 
such as types of psychology, character and personality, intelligence, 
instinct, habit, sleep and dreams, hypnotism, human variability. 

373. Social Psychology. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Psychology 1. 
Spring Quarter. Campus I. Miss Zeigler. 

The social aspects of psychology; problems of social stimulation, 
organization, tradition, custom, motive, suggestion, attitude, etc., as 
they relate to group action and social improvement. 

374. Genetic Psychology. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Psychology 1. 
Winter Quarter. Campus I. Miss Zeigler. 

The evolution of structure and of behavior; the period of ontogenetic 
development, in so far as scientific data are available; the problems 
of maturity and senescence as integral parts of the life cycle are 
given careful study. 

SENIOR DIVISION OR GRADUATE COURSES 

400-401 (Sr.) 600-601 (Gr.). Systematic Psychology. 5 or 10 hours. 
Prerequisite: For minor, one year of psychology and evidence of 



212 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

ability to do, the work of the course; for part of major, four courses 
of psychology. Mr. Edwards. 

An advanced course in systematic and experimental psychology 
intended as a detailed study in theoretical discussions and investiga- 
tions of special topics. Critical study of one systematic treatise and 
experimental work on special topics. 

410-411 (Sr.) 610-611 (Gr.) Special Problems. 5 or 10 hours. 
1 hour discussion, 8 hours laboratory. Fee $2.50. Prerequisite: For 
minor, one year of psychology, and, evidence of ability to do the work 
of the course; for part of a major, four courses of psychology. Mr. 
Edwards. 

Critical study of special problems in psychology, both experimental 
and theoretical, such as types of psychology, association and memory, 
attention and feeling, behavior and psychological examining and diag- 
nosis. A special topic or experiment will be assigned each student 
for careful investigation. 

412-413 (Sr.) 612-613 (Gr.). Clinical Problems. 5 or 10 hours. 
1 hour discussion, 8 hours laboratory and clinical work. Fee $2.50. 
Prerequisite: For minor, one year of psychology and evidence of ability 
to do the work of the course; for part of major four, courses of 
psychology. Mr. Edwards. 

Clinical studies of cases, including the use of experimental methods, 
clinical diagnosis and special tests with critical study of a problem 
or of problems ^specially selected for each student. 

461 (Sr.) 661 (Gr.). Advanced Experimental Psychology. 5 hours. 
1 hour discussion, 8 hours laboratory and clinical work. Science 
group. Fee $2.50. Prerequisite: Psychology 1 and 22. Fall Quarter. 
Mr. Edwards and Miss Young. 

Emphasis is placed upon experimental technique and methods of 
experimental work. Specially adapted for the student who desires 
to learn scientific method and for the student who is going on in 
psychology. 

462 (Sr.) 662 (Gr.). Clinical Psychology. 1 hour discussion, 4 
hours clinical work. Fee $2.50. Prerequisite: 1 and 323. Winter 
Quarter. Mr. Edwards and Miss Young. 

Deals with problems of the normal, abnormal, maladjustments, de- 
linquency, mental disease, methods of clinical examination, diagnosis, 
prognosis, and treatment, and will be related especially to the work 
of The University of Georgia Clinic. 

463 (Sr.) 663 (Gr.). Clinical Psychology. 5 hours. 2 or 3 hours 
advanced discussions and 4 or 5 hours clinical examining and case 
work. A continuation of Psychology 462-662. Fee $2.50. Prerequisite: 
The same as for 462, and preferably also Psychology 462. Spring 
Quarter. Campus I. 

Note: Only part of the above courses are offered during a given 
year or summer session. It is planned to give those which best fit 



GENERAL INFORMATION 213^ 

the needs of the students. Normally one graduate course is offered 
per quarter. 

490 (Sr.) 690 (Gr.). Development of the Young Child. 5 hours. 
Three lecture periods per week and four hours of laboratory work in 
the Nursery School. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Fall 
and Spring Quarters. Campus II. Miss Young. 

A study of the physical, mental, emotional, and social development 
of the preschool child, the environmental factors influencing the de- 
velopment of the young child with emphasis upon techniques of guid- 
ance. Planned to meet requirements for teachers of home economics 
in high schools; desirable also for teachers of elementary grades. 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

FRENCH 

JUNIOR DIVISION COURSES 

101. Elementary French. 5 hours. Credited only as first half of 
a double course. Fall and Winter Quarters. Campuses I and III. 
Miss Brumby, Miss Hall,. Miss Strahan, Mr. Chance, and Mr. Thaxton. 

Elementary grammar, pronunciation, dictation, and reading. See 
French 102. 

102. Intermediate French. 5 hours. French 101-102 form double 
course. Prerequisite: French 101 or its equivalent. Winter and 
Spring Quarters. Campuses I and III. Miss Brumby, Miss Hall, Miss 
Strahan, Mr. Chance, and Mr. Thaxton. 

Intermediate grammar and composition, conversation, reading, and 
translation. (Students offering two units in French for entrance will 
enter French 103). 

103. Grammar Review. 5 hours. Prerequisite: French 101-102 or two 
entrance units in French. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Cam- 
puses I and III. Mr. Chance, Mr. Thaxton, Miss Brumby, Miss Hall, 
and Miss Strahan. 

Reading of about 600 pages from standard authors. A study of 
grammatical difficulties and idioms. 

104. French Grammar and Composition. 5 hours. Prerequisite: 
French 103 or its equivalent. Winter and Spring Quarters. Campuses 
I and III. Mr. Chance, Mr. Thaxton, Miss Brumby, Miss Hall, and 
Miss Strahan. 

Reading. Advanced grammar. Oral and written composition. Con- 
versation. 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

305. Introductory Survey of French Literature. 5 hours. Pre- 
requisite: French 104. Fall and Spring Quarters. Campuses I and 
III. Mr. Chance, Miss Brumby, and Miss Strahan. 



214 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Introduction to French literature through texts and lectures. Read- 
ing of about 1,000 pages from eight centuries of French literature. 

456 (656). Advanced French Syntax and Composition. 5 hours. Pre- 
requisite: French 305. Winter Quarter. Campuses I and III. Mr. 
Chance and Miss Brumby. 

357. French Phonetics. 5 hours. Prerequisite: French 305. Spring 
Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Thaxton. 

The organs of speech, the differences in production of French and 
English speech sounds, and the various speech phenomena such as 
assimilation, linking, and the length of vowel sounds. Practice in 
phonetic transcription and pronunciation. 

358. Historical French Grammar and the Study of French Words 
of Romance Origin. 5 hours. Prerequisite: French 305. Spring 
Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Chance and Mr. Thaxton. 



SENIOR DIVISION OR GRADUATE COURSES 

(Students desiring graduate credit in any of the following courses 
must offer as a prerequisite French 305 and one additional advanced 
course unless other specific prerequisites are listed). 

460 (Sr.) 660 (Gr.). Survey of French Literature of the 17th 
Century. 5 hours. Prerequisite: French 305. Fall Quarter. Campus 
I. Mr. Thaxton. 

Selections will be read from the best writers of the Golden Age, 
with special emphasis on the selected plays of Corneille, Moliere, and 
Racine. 

461 (Sr.) 661 (Gr.). Survey of French Literature of the 18th 
Century. 5 hours. Prerequisite: French 305. Winter Quarter. Cam- 
pus I. Mr. Chance and Miss Hall. 

Selections will be read from Voltaire, Rousseau, Montesquieu, Mari- 
vaux, Lesage, Buffon, Diderot, Prevost, Bernardin de Saint Pierre, 
and Andre Chenier. 

462 (Sr.) 662 (Gr.). Survey of French Literature from Beginning 
of the 19th Century to the Present Time. 5 hours. Prerequisite: 
French 305. Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Chance and Miss Hall. 

A study of the tendencies of the period. Special attention will be 
given to Realism and Naturalism. 

400-401 (Sr.) 600-601 (Gr.). The Novel in France in the Second Half 
of the 19th Century. 10 hours. Prerequisite: French 305 and at 
least two advanced courses. Campus I. Mr. Chance. 

402 (Sr.) 602 (Gr.). Moliere and His Theater. 5 hours. Prere- 
quisite: French 305. Campus I. Mr. Thaxton. (Not offered in 1940- 
41). 



GENERAL INFORMATION 215 

403 (Sr.) 603 (Gr.). Corneille and Racine: Classical Tradegy. 5 
hours. Prerequisite: French 305 and one other advanced course. 
Campus I. Mr. Thaxton. 

406 (Sr.) 606 (Gr.). Introduction to Old French. 5 hours. Prere- 
quisites: French 305 and two years of Latin. Campus I. Mr. Thaxton. 

A study of Phonology and Morphology, followed by the reading of 
the Chanson de Roland. 

407 (Sr.) 607 (Gr.). A Survey of French Literature of the Middle 
Ages. 5 hours. Prerequisites: French 305 and 406 (Sr.). Campu3 
I. Mr. Thaxton. 

408 (Sr.) 608 (Gr.). The Prose Writers of the 16th Century. 5 
hours. Prerequisite: French 305. (Not offered in 1940-41.) 

409 (Sr.) 609 (Gr.). The Poets of the 16th Century. 5 hours. Pre- 
requisite: French 305. (Not offered in 1940-41.) 

410 (Sr.) 610 (Gr.). French Drama of the 19th Century. 5 hours. 
Prerequisite: French 305. Campus I. Mr. Thaxton and Miss Hall. 
(Not offered in 1940-41.) 

411 (Sr.) 611 (Gr.). Romantic Movement in France. 5 hours. Pre- 
requisite: French 305. Campus I. Miss Brumby. 

412 (Sr.) 612 (Gr.). French Dramatic Literature of the 20th 
Century. 5 hours. Prerequisites: French 305 and one other advanced 
course. Campus I. Mr. Thaxton and Miss Hall. 

456 (Sr.) 656 (Gr.). Advanced French Syntax and Composition. 
5 hours. Prerequisite: French 305. Campus I. Mr. Chance, Miss 
Brumby, and Miss Strahan. 

800 (Gr.). Thesis: An Introduction to the Methods of Literary His- 
tory Followed by the Preparation of the Thesis. Campus I. Staff. 

ITALIAN 

301. Elementary Italian. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. 
Cohn. 

Elementary grammar, pronunciation, dictation, and reading. 

302. Intermediate Italian. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Italian 301. 
Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Cohn. 

Intermediate grammar, composition, conversation, reading, and 
translation. 

303. Review of Italian Grammar. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Italian 
301 and 302. Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Cohn. 

Advanced grammar and idioms, composition, conversation, transla- 
tion, and reading from standard authors. 



216 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

SPANISH 

101. Elementary Spanish. 5 hours. Credited only as first half of 
a double course. Pall Quarter. Campuses I and III. Mr. Chance, 
Mr. Thaxton, Miss Strahan, and Miss Hall. 

Elementary grammar, pronunciation, dictation, and reading. See 
Spanish 102. 

102. Elementary Spanish Continued. 5 hours. Spanish 101 and 
102 form double course. Prerequisite: Spanish 101 or its equivalent. 
Winter Quarter. Campuses I and III. Mr. Chance, Mr. Thaxton, 
Miss Strahan, and Miss Hall. 

Grammar, composition, conversation, reading and translation. (Stu- 
dents offering two units in Spanish for entrance will enter Spanish 
103). 

103. Grammar Review. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Spanish 101 and 
102 or two entrance units in Spanish. Fall and Spring Quarters. 
Campuses I and III. Mr. Chance, Mr. Thaxton, Miss Strahan, and 
Miss Hall. 

Reading of about 600 pages from standard authors. A study of 
grammatical difficulties, and idioms, drill on radical and orthographical 
changing verbs and irregular verbs. 

104. Spanish Grammar and Composition. 5 hours. Prerequisite: 
Spanish 103 or its equivalent. Winter Quarter. Campuses I and III. 
Mr. Chance, Mr. Thaxton, Miss Strahan, and Miss Hall. 

Reading. Advanced grammar. Oral and written composition. Con- 
versation. 

305. Introductory Survey of Spanish Literature. 5 hours. Prere- 
quisite: Spanish 104. Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Chance, Mr. 
Thaxton, Miss Strahan, and Miss Hall. 

Introduction to tne literature of Spain and Spanish America. 

SCIENCE SURVEYS 

1-2. Human Biology. Double course. 10 hours. (Five hours per 
quarter.) Fall and Winter, and Winter and Spring Quarters. Cam- 
puses I and III. Mr. Byrd, Mr. Nuttycombe, Mr. Lee, and Miss Dunn. 

The aim of this course is to give the student some acquaintance 
with vital phenomena in general and their application to the human 
organisms. The first half of the course will deal particularly with 
the problems of the individual. Its subject matter will include an 
introduction to the fundamental facts of biology, human anatomy, 
and physiology, and the maintenance of health in the individual. 
The second half will deal with problems of the racial life of man. 
In this phase of the course will be included studies of public health 
problems, reproductions, genetics and eugenics, and racial develop- 
ment. 




GENERAL INFORMATION 217 

1-2. Physical Science. Double course. 10 hours. (Five hours per 
quarter.) Fall and Winter, and Winter and Spring Quarters. Cam- 
puses I and III. The departments of Chemistry and Physics and 
Astronomy cooperate in giving these courses. 

The fundamental objective of this course will be to give the student 
an intelligent understanding of the scope of modern physical science 
with the emphasis upon the meaning and value of the scientific 
method of procedure, upon the meaning and history of the develop- 
ment of the great generalizations of physical science, and upon applica- 
tion of these generalizations in modifying practical life of the modern 
age. The first unit will be devoted primarily to physics and astronomy 
subject matter, the second unit to chemistry, geology, and geography 
subject matter, but there will be a considerable mingling of the four 
sciences to present a unified picture of the whole. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE SURVEYS 

la-b-c. Social Science Survey. 9 hours. (Three hours per quar- 
ter.) Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Campuses I and III. 

A brief study of the historical, political, economic and social factors 
molding modern civilization. Taught by members of the Departments 
of History, Sociology, and Economics. 

4. Contemporary Georgia. 5 hours. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quar- 
ters. Campuses I and III. The departments of Economics and 
Sociology cooperate in giving this course. 

A discussion and analysis of certain phases of Georgia's population, 
its characteristics and trends; its relative standing in various statis- 
tical measures of economic and social well-being; its natural resources 
and economic accomplishments from the standpoint of agriculture, 
industry, and commerce; and its governmental organization and 
problems. 

SOCIAL WORK 
For courses of instruction see the bulletin of the Graduate School. 



SPEECH 

JUNIOR DIVISION COURSES 

8. Voice and Diction. 5 hours. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. 
Campuses I and III. Fundamental principles for control and develop- 
ment of the speaking voice. Laboratory fee $1.00. Miss Vance. 

50. Essentials of Public Speaking. 5 hours. Fall, Winter, and 
Spring Quarters. Elementary course in preparation and delivery of 
speeches of various types. (Formerly Speech 1). Campus I. Mr. 
Green. 

Speech Clinic. Laboratory examination, diagnosis, and drill ses- 
sions for various types of defective speech. Open to all students of 



218 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

the University. (Work arranged by individual appointment.) Fall, 
Winter, and Spring Quarters. Campus I. Laboratory fee $1.00. Miss 
Vance. 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

309. English Phonetics. 5 hours. Campus I. Fall Quarter. Pre- 
requisite: Speech 8. Study of the International Phonetic Alphabet 
and characteristic English intonations with emphasis on sectional and 
dialectic variants. Miss Vance. 

310. Speech Correction. 5 hours. Spring Quarter. Campus I. 
Prerequisite: Speech 8. Designed to help teachers wtih the diagnosis 
and treatment of the articulatory and vocal defects common among 
children. Laboratory required. Miss Vance. 

350. Argumentation. 5 hours. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Elementary 
principles of logic, argument, and debate. (Formerly 340.) Mr. Green. 

386. Oral Interpretation of Narrative and Lyric Literature. 
6 hours. Campus I. Fall and Winter Quarters. (Three hours each 
quarter.) Basic principles necessary to enjoyable oral reading of the 
story and the lyric. Prerequisite: Speech 8. Miss Vance. 

396. Oral Interpretation of Dramatic Literature. 6 hours. 
Winter and Spring Quarters. Campus I. Projects for literary analy- 
sis and oral reading are chosen from Browning, Shakespeare, Ibsen, 
Wilde, Barrie, Shaw, O'Neill, and Maxwell Anderson. Prerequisite: 
Speech 8. Miss Vance. 

SOCIOLOGY 

JUNIOR DIVISION COURSES 

The Sociology Department cooperates with Economics and History 
Departments in offering the survey courses, Social Science 1-2 and 4. 

5. Introductory Sociology. 5 hours. Campuses I and III. Mr. 
Hutchinson and Staff. 

An introductory study of social relations and social institutions de- 
signed to give the student a general acquaintance and a concrete under- 
standing of the social world in which he lives. This course is recom- 
mended especially to those who wish to take a major in sociology. 

5 a-b. Introductory Sociology. 6 hours. Campus I. Mr. Hutchinson 
and Staff. 

A course similar to Sociology 5. 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

307. Elementary Principles of Sociology. 5 hours. Prerequisite: 
Sociology 5, unless waived by department head. Open to sophomores 
who have credit in Sociology 5, as a Senior Division elective and to 



GENERAL INFORMATION 219 

all Senior Division students. Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters. 
Campuses I and III. Mr. Hutchinson and Staff. 

How human society and human beings have come to be what they 
are. This course is intended to give a general survey of the funda- 
mental concepts, the basic principles, and the technique of study in 
sociology. 

307 a-b. 6 hours. Fall and Winter Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Hutch- 
inson and Staff. (Not offered 1940-41.) 

A course similar to Sociology 307. 

305. Elementary Principles of Sociology. 3 hours. Prerequisite: 
Sociology 5 a-b. Campus I. Mr. Hutchinson and Staff. 

This group of courses 5 a-b and 305 is essentially the same as 5 
and 307 and is designed primarily for sophomores. As a prerequisite 
to more advanced work credit in these courses may be used in lieu 
of Sociology 5 and 307. 

326. Georgia Archaeology. 3 hours. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. 
Wauchope. 

The culture of the ancient Indians of Georgia studied through arch- 
aeology and early historical narratives. Students will have oppor- 
tunity to visit and take part in archaeological excavations and to see 
how the materials thus obtained are studied and interpreted in the 
archaeological laboratory at the University. 

327. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology. Man and Culture 
in the Making. 5 hours. Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Gittler 
or Mr. Wauchope. 

An introductory study of preliterate cultures and how they are 
linked up with the more complex cultures, past and present. 

308. Contemporary Social Problems. 3 hours. (Not offered 1940- 
41.) 

340. Contemporary Social Problems. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Ap- 
proval of instructor. Winter Quarter. Campus I. (An elective credit 
course.) Mr. Meadows. 

This is an introductory course designed for those who may desire 
to elect only one course in Sociology. 

356. Elementary Social Statistics. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Sociology 
307. Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Gittler. 

An introduction to the fundamental principles of statistical method 
as a technique of study in sociology. It is the intention of this course 
to give the student an elementary reading knowledge of statistical 
sociology. 

360. Contemporary Social Problems. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Soci- 
ology 5 or 307. Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Fink. 

In this course the student will be expected to be able to use the con- 
cepts and principles developed in 5 or 307 in an analysis of comtem- 
porary social tendencies and conditions in the United States and the 
social problems to which they give rise. 



220 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

361. The Family. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Approval of the instruc- 
tor in charge of the course. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Coutu. 

This course is designed primarily as an elective. It differs from 
461 in that it is less technical. Credit may not be received for both 
courses. 

Sociology 370. Introduction to Public Welfare Administration. 
5 hours. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor. Fall Quarter. Campus 
I. Mr. Fink. 

A course that traces the historical development of public welfare 
services and considers their administration. Reference is made to 
the underlying problems with which present day public welfare de- 
partments deal, and special attention is paid to administration at 
local, state, and federal levels. Public administration as applied to 
welfare services is considered in its relation to administration in 
other fields. Discussion and readings. 

381. Criminology and Penology. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Sociology 
5 or 307. Campus I, Spring Quarter. Mr. Fink. 

An analysis of the nature and theories of crime, history of the 
treatment, a comparative study of present methods of dealing with 
the criminal and a critical study of the methods employed in our own 
State. 

391. Social Evaluations. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Sociology 5 or 
307. Campus I. 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with that phase of 
sociology in which either minority or majority groups are arriving 
at new standards of value. 



SENIOR DIVISION OR GRADUATE COURSES 

400 (Sr.). The Field of Social Work. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Same 
as for 401. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Fink. 

This course is designed to give the student some knowledge of the 
history of the development of social work and such a knowledge of 
what is being done at present and how it is being done as will enable 
him to arrive at an intelligent understanding of the part social work 
is playing in modern life. It is a course for the general student and 
an introductory course basic to technical courses in social work. 

This course corresponds with a graduate course 600 in the Depart- 
ment of Social Work. It is desirable for this course to be taken in 
the senior year. 

401 (Sr.) 601 (Gr.). Social Philosophy. 5 hours. Prerequisite: 

(a) As an elective, credit in Sociology 5 and one senior college course, 

(b) as part of an undergraduate major or of a graduate minor, 307 
and one additional senior college course or credit in 408. (c) as part 
of a graduate major credit in 307 and two additional senior college 
courses, one of which may be in Introductory Psychology or credit 
in 408 and one additional course. Campus I. 

This course is a comparative study of the philosophies of the leaders 



GENERAL INFORMATION 221 

who have contributed to the development of sociological theory and of 
the influence of their philosophy on the techniques of study and re- 
search in sociology. 

408 (Sr.) 608 (Gr.). Advanced Principles of Sociology. 5 hours. 
Prerequisite (a) For undergraduate credit, Sociology 5 and one senior 
college course, (b) For graduate credit as part of a minor, one ad- 
ditional course in Sociology or general psychology, (c) As part of a 
graduate major four courses at least two or which are of senior col- 
lege rank. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Gittler. 

This course is required of all sociology majors who have not taken 
Sociology 307 at The University of Georgia. It is a more advanced 
course than 307 and may profitably be taken by those who have credit 
in 307. 

420 (Sr.) 620 (Gr.). Introduction to Sociological Reseaech. 3 
hours. Prerequisite: Same as for 401. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. 
Qittler. 

An introductory course with emphasis on the techniques of gather- 
ing sociological data. This course will be of value to a social worker, 
a teacher, in short to any one whose work calls for any knowledge of 
human relations. 

421 (Sr.) 621 (Gr.). Sociological Research. 3 hours. Prerequisite: 
Sociology 420. Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Gittler. 

A study of the theory and techniques of sociological research, their 
problems and limitations; an evaluation of quantitative and qualita- 
tive methods. 

427 a-b (Sr.) 627 a-b (Gr.). Personality and Social Adjustment. 
6 hours. Prerequisite: Same as for 401. Winter and Spring Quarters. 
Campus I. Mr. Coutw. 

A study of the genesis of personality and the mechanisms of social 
adjustment. This is a course in social psychology from the viewpoint 
of sociology which interprets living and personality development pri- 
marily as adjustment within one's culture. 

428 (Sr.) 628 (Gr.). Contemporary Social Trends. 5 hours. (Not 
offered 1940-41.) 

429 (Sr.) 629 (Gr.). Problems of Personality Disorganization. 3 
hours. Prerequisite: Same as for 401. Winter Quarter. Campus I. 
Mr. Hutchinson. 

A study of disordered social relationships from the point of view 
of the social processes which bring them about — the genesis of anti- 
social attitudes in the individual and the social disorganization to 
which this may lead. 

431 (Sr.) 631 (Gr.). Rural Sociology. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Same 
as for 401. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Meadows. 

The study of rural society: Its organizations — neighborhoods, inter- 
est groups, etc.; its people and their changing characteristics; its social 
institutions and their growing importance. 



222 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

433 (Sr.) 633 (Gr.). Theory and Dynamics of Population. 5 hours. 
Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Coutu. 

While the theory of population movements is given adequate con- 
sideration the emphasis of this course is on the actual dynamic aspects 
of population growth, population pressure, migration, urbanization, 
composition (age-sex-racial), variations in physical developments; 
problems arising from differential fertility; problems of birth rate 
control, and other related problems. 

434 (Sr.) 634 (Gr.). Problems of Social Control. 3 hours. Prere- 
quisite: Same as for 401. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Hutchinson. 

A study of the factors present in a democratic society or community 
by which it is controlled and controls itself. 

435 (Sr.) 635 (Gr.). Rural Community Organization. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: Same as for 401. Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. 
Meadows. 

A study of contemporary trends in rural community organization 
and rural planning. 

437 (Sr.) 637 (Gr.). Race Relations in the United States. 5 
hours. Prerequisite: Same as for 401. (Not offered 1940-41.) 

A study of those races with which the American white man has 
come in contact and between whom social opposition has arisen. 
Problems of exploitation and conflict to which this has given rise. 
Present attempts at adjustment. 

450 (Sr.) 650 (Gr.). Statistical Methods in Social Research. 5 
hours. Prerequisite: 356 and Mathematics 357. Winter Quarter. Cam- 
pus I. Mr. Gittler. 

Application of statistical methods to social research problems. 

461 (Sr.) 661 (Gr.). The Family. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Same as 
for 401. Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Coutu. 

This course presents family study from many different angles 
utilizing data from the fields of anthropology, individual and social 
psychology, history, sociology, economics, and psychiatry. 

461 a-b (Sr.) 661 a-b (Gr.). 6 hours. Prerequisite: Same as for 
401. (Not offered 1940-41.) 

463 (Sr.) 663 (Gr.). Family Disorganization. 3 hours. Prerequi- 
site: Same as for 401. Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Coutu. 

A study of family disorganization in its relation to larger group 
relations with which it is interrelated. 

521 Sr.) 621 Gr.). The Social Process as Human Progress. 5 hours. 
Campus I. Mr. Hutchinson. 

Group organization as a personal form-group life in which the 
group is conscious of itself in relation to the goal or objective toward 
which it is moving. A critical analysis of the technique by which 
this phase of the social process may be inductively studied. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 223 

522 (Sr.) 722 (Gr.). Development of Sociological Theory from Plato 
to Comte. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Same as for 401 plus one additional 
course. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Hutchinson. 

523 (Sr.) 723 (Gr.). Development of Sociological Theory from 
Comte to End of 19th Century. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Same as for 
522. Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Hutchinson. 

524 (Sr.) 724 (Gr.). Current Trends in Sociological Theory. 3 
hours. Prerequisite: Same as for 522. Spring Quarter. Campus I. 
Mr. Hutchinson. 

525 (Sr.) 725 (Gr.). Modern European Sociology: Great Britain, 
France, and Holland. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Same as for Sociology 
522. Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Gittler. 

Studies of 20th century, Britain, French, and Dutch sociologists 
including Hobhouse, Durkheim, Maunier, Mauss, and others. 

526 (Sr.) 726 (Gr.). Modern European Sociology: Germany, Italy, 
Czechoslovakian and Scandinavian CouNTRrES. 3 hours. Prerequi- 
site: Same as for Sociology 522. Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. 
Gittler. 

Studies of 20th century German, Italian, Czechoslovakian, and Scan- 
dinavian sociologists, including Simmel, Tonnis, Max Weber, Karl 
Mannheim, Pareto, Masaryk, and others. 

825. Sociological Seminar. Credit adjusted in each individual case 
with the Dean. 

ZOOLOGY 

JUNIOR DIVISION COURSES 

1-2. Human Biology. (See Science Surveys). 

25-26. General Zoology. 10 hours. (Five hours per quarter.) Two 
lecture and three double laboratory periods. Laboratory fee $2.50 
per quarter. Prerequisite: Human Biology 1-2. Fall, Winter, and 
Spring Quarters. Campuses I and III. Mr. Jsluttycomoe, Mr. Cantrell, 
and Assistants. 

Zoology 25 is a general survey of the invertebrate animals. Zoology 
26 is a survey of the vertebrates. 

SENIOR DIVISION COURSES 

No student will be allowed to take as an elective a Senior Division 
course in zoology unless he has an average of 70 or above in all 
prerequisite courses. 

309. Human Physiology. 5 hours. Five lecture periods. Prere- 
quisite: Human Biology 1-2 and Zoology 25-26. Winter Quarter. Cam- 
pus I. Mr. Cantrell. 



224 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

A lecture course dealing with the functions of organ systems of 
the human in health. 

353. Field Zoology. 5 hours. Two lecture and three double labora- 
tory periods. Laboratory fee $2.50. Prerequisite: Zoology 25f26. 
Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Nuttycomoe. 

In this course attention is directed mainly to locally encountered 
invertebrates exclusive of the insects. 

354. Cytology. 5 hours. Two lecture and three double laboratory 
periods. Laboratory fee $2.50. Prerequisite: Zoology 25-26. (Not 
offered 1940-41.) 

A study of the structural elements of cells with special reference 
to transformations in the germ cells. 

355. Embbyology. 5 hours. Two lecture and three double laboratory 
periods. Laboratory fee $2.50. Breakage fee $2.50. Prerequisite: 
Zoology 25-26. Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Nuttycomoe. 

An elementary course in embryology in which the chick is used to 
illustrate the basic principles of developmental anatomy. 

356. Comparative Anatomy of Veetebbates. 5 hours. Two lecture 
and three double laboratory periods. Laboratory fee $5.00. Prere- 
quisite: Zoology 25-26. Winter Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Waters. 

A comparison of the structure and development of organ systems in 
the different vertebrate groups. 

357. Animal Histology. 5 hours. Two lecture and three double 
laboratory periods. Laboratory fee $2.50. Breakage fee $2.50. Prere- 
quisite: Zoology 25-26. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Waters. 

A comparative study of the histological structure of organ systems 
in representative types of vertebrate animals. 

361. Histological Technique. 5 hours. Five double laboratory 
periods. Laboratory fee $5.00. Open to majors in zoology only. 
Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Waters. 

A course offering training in the preparation of histological material, 
including practice in fixing, staining, sectioning, and mounting. 

367. Human Anatomy. 5 hours. Two recitation and three double 
laboratory periods. Laboratory fee $2.50. Prerequisite: Zoology 25-26. 
Fall Quarter. Campus I. Miss Jordan. 

This course is given exclusively for majors in Physical Education 
for Women. 

370. Hebedity. 5 hours. Five lecture periods. Prerequisite: Zoology 
25-26. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr Waters. 

A study of the laws of biological inheritance and their application 
to man and other animals. 

371. Animal Evolution. 5 hours. Prerequisite: Zoology 25-26 and 
355 or 356. (Not offered 1940-41.) 

A study of evidence indicating the trend and the causes of evolu- 
tion in plants and animals. 

372. Parasitology. 5 hours. Three lecture and two double labora- 



GENERAL INFORMATION 225 

tory periods. Laboratory fee $2.50. Prerequisite: Zoology 25-26. 
Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Byrd. 

This course is a general study of the protozoa and worms parasitic 
in man and the lower animals. 

373. General Entomology. 5 hours. Three lecture and two double 
laboratory periods. Laboratory fee $2.50. Prerequisite: Zoology 25- 
26. Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Lund. 

A study of the structure, biology, and classification of insects and 
of their general importance and significance to man. 

375. Forest Entomology. 5 hours. Three lecture and two double 
laboratory periods. Laboratory fee $2.50. Fall, Winter, and Spring 
Quarters. Campus I. Mr. Lund. 

A study of the biology, classification and control of insect species 
destructive to American forests. 

376. Medical Entomology. 5 hours. Three lecture and two double 
laboratory periods. Laboratory fee $2.50. Prerequisite: Zoology 25-26. 
Fall Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Lund. 

A study of the biology, classification and control of the species 
of insects of particular importance in the cause or transmission of dis- 
ease. 

380. Mammalian Anatomy. Two lecture and three double labora- 
tory periods. Laboratory fee $5.00. Prerequisite: Human Biology 
1-2. Spring Quarter. Campus I. Mr. Boyd. 

A study of the anatomy of one or more representative mammals. 

SENIOR DIVISION OR GRADUATE COURSES 

401 (Sr.) 601 (Gr.). Advanced Invertebrate Zoology. 5 hours. Two 
lecture and three double laboratory periods. Laboratory fee $2.50. 
Prerequisite: Zoology 25-26 and 353 or equivalent. Campus I. Mr. 
Nuttycombe. 

A course devoted to the study of the morphology, taxonomy and 
relationships of invertebrates, exclusive of insects. Emphasis is placed 
upon the local fauna. 

402 (Sr.) 602 (Gr.). Advanced Invertebrate Zoology (Continued). 
5 hours. Two lecture and three double laboratory periods. Labora- 
tory fee $2.50. Prerequisite: Zoology 401. Fall Quarter. Mr. Nutty- 
combe. 

A continuation of Zoology 401 (601) in which intensive study is 
limited to problems of morphology, taxonomy and physiology of some 
limited group of invertebrates. 

408 (Sr.) 608 (Gr.). Animal Physiology. 5 hours. Three lecture 
and two double laboratory periods. Laboratory fee $2.50. Prere- 
quisite: Zoology 25-26. Winter Quarter. Mr. Boyd. 

This is a comparative study of the physiology of illustrative groups 
of animals. 

410 (Sr.) 610 (Gr.). Endocrine Physiology. 5 hours. Three lecture 
and two double laboratory periods. Laboratory fee $2.50. Prere- 
quisite: Zoology 25-26 and Zoology 355 or 356 or 408. 

A general physiology of the glands of internal secretion and their 
harmones. 



INDEX 



Page 

Absences 79 

Accredited High Schools .... 43 
Activities, Student Life and . . 66 

Administrative Officers 5 

— General 5 

— Educational 6 

Administrative Regulations ... 72 

Admission Requirements .... 41 

Methods of Admission .... 41 

— by certificate 41 

— by examination 43 

— as special student .... 43 
— to Graduate School .... 47 

—to Law School 48 

Advanced Standing 44 

Advisers 37 

Agricultural Economics, Courses 

in 124 

Agricultural Education, Courses 

in 162 

Agricultural Engineering, Courses 

in 120 

Agriculture, College of .... 101 

Agronomy, Courses in 128 

Animal Husbandry, Courses in . 132 
Anthropology and Archaeology, 

Courses in 219 

Archaeology and Anthropology, 

Courses in 219 

Art, Courses in 134 

— public school 139 

Art, Department of 95 

Arts and Sciences, College of . . 83 
Astronomy, Courses in ... . 205 

Attendance 79 

— Freshman Week 50 

Bacteriology, Courses in ... . 140 
Board and Lodging, private for 

men 56 

Board of Regents 4 

Botany, Courses in 141 

Campuses 31 

Changes in Registration .... 81 

Chapel Exercises 72 

Chemistry. Courses in 143 

Classification of Students .... 74 

College of Arts and Sciences . . 83 
Colleges and Schools other than 

Arts and Sciences 100 



Page 

College Year 33 

Commerce, School of 108 

— Courses in 149 

Commerce and Law, Combina- 
tion Course 112 

Constitutional Examination ... 78 

Co-ordinate College 38 

Correspondence and Extension . 33 

Cost of Living 51 

Counselors, Student 37 

Course Organization 73 

— Numbering 73 

—Schedule 82 

Courses of Instruction .... 120 
Credits, System of 73 

Dairy Husbandry, Courses in . . 133 

Dean's List 78 

Debating Societies 67 

Degrees Offered 35 

Degree Requirements 

Bachelor of Arts 86 

Arts and Law Curriculum . . 88 
Bachelor of Arts in Journalism 114 
Bachelor of Fine Arts .... 94 

—Major in Art 96 

— Major in Landscape Archi- 
tecture 98 

— Major in Music 94 

Bachelor of Laws 100 

Bachelor of Science 89 

Science and Law Curriculum 91 
Science and Medicine Curric- 
ulum 91 

Bachelor of Science in Agricul- 
ture 102 

Bachelor of Science in Agricul- 
tural Engineering 103 

Bachelor of Science in Chem- 
istry 93 

Bachelor of Science in Commerce 109 
Bachelor of Science in Educa- 
tion 105 

— Major in Agriculture . . . 106 
— Major in Home Economics 107 
— Major in Physical Education 

(for men) 106 

Bachelor of Science in Forestry 118 
Bachelor of Science in Home 

Economics 116 

Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 104 



[226] 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



22- 



Page 
Bachelor of Science in Physical 

Education for Women . . . 108 
Doctor of Philosophy .... 36 

Masters Degrees 35 

Degree Requirements, Modifica- 
tions for Transfer Students . 46 
Departmental or Specialized Clubs 68 
Divisions of University 

Junior Division 34 

— Uniform Program .... 84 

Senior Division 34 

— Program 85 

Dormitories 

Men 56 

Women 55 

Dormitory and Dining Hall Fees ' 57 

Dramatics 99 

— Courses in 153 

Economics, Courses in 154 

Education, College of 105 

— Courses in 137 

English, Courses in 163 

Enrollment 49 

Entrance Requirements .... 41 
Exemptions for Transfer Students 46 

Expenses 51 

Extension Courses 33 

Extra Load of Work 75 

Faculty and Staff 7 

Family Life. Courses in ... . 180 

Fees and Expenses 51 

— Special 54 

Refunds 54 

— Room and Board 55 

Fellowships 59 

Phelps-Stokes 66 

Foreign or Government Service. 

Preparation for 89 

Forestry. School of 118 

— Courses in 166 

Fraternities. Honorary 68 

—Social 68 

— Professional 68 

French. Courses in 213 

Freshman Week 50 

Geography. Courses in 170 

Geology. Courses in 170 

German, Courses in 171 

Government, History and, Exam- 
ination 78 

Grades, Scholastic 76 



Page 

Graduate Assistants 28 

Graduate School 35 

— Admission to 47 

Graduation Requirements .... 77 
Greek, Courses in 173 

Health Service 39 

History and Government Exam- 
ination 78 

History and Political Science, 

Courses in 174 

Home Economics Education, 

Courses in 163 

Home Economics, School of . . . 116 

— Courses in 177 

Honorary Societies and Frater- 
nities 68 

Honors and Appointments .... 69 

Honors Day 71 

Horticulture, Courses in . . . 180 
Human Biology Survey Courses 216 
Humanities Survey Courses . . 183 

Instruction, Courses of 120 

Independent Study 80 

Infirmary 39 

Irregular Students 44 

Italian 215 

Journalism, School of 114 

— Courses in 183 

Junior Division 34 

Uniform Program 84 

Landscape Architecture, Courses 

in 185 

Late Registration. Fee 51 

Latin. Courses in 187 

Laundry, University 58 

Law, School of 100 

— Admission to 48 

—Courses in 188 

Literary Societies and Debating 67 

Living Facilities 55 

Load of Work 

— Extra 75 

— Normal 74 

Loan and Scholarship Funds . . 59 

Major Concentration for Bach- 
elor of Arts and Bachelor of 

Science 85 

Masters Degrees 35 

Mathematics, Courses in ... . 190 



228 



THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



Page 
Medical College, Minimum Ad- 
mission Requirements .... 92 

Medical Examinations 40 

Medical Regulations 39 

Men's Dormitories 56 

Military Science and Tactics, 

Courses in 195 

Minimum Residence Requirements 47 
Modifications of Degree Require- 
ments for Transfer Stu- 
dents 86 

Music, Department of 94 

— Courses in 193 

— Organizations 66 

— Practical 195 

Non-Resident Students ... .52 

Normal Load of Work 74 

Numbering System for Courses . 73 

Opportunities for Self-Help ... 58 
Organization of University ... 31 

Personnel Office 37 

Pharmacy, School of 104 

— Courses in 197 

Thelps-Stokes Fellowship .... 66 

Philosophy, Courses in 199 

Physical Education for Men, 

Courses in 200 

Physical Education for Women, 

Courses in 201 

Physical Examination .... 40 
Physical Science Survey Courses 217 
Physics and Astronomy, Courses 

in 205 

Placement Tests 50 

Plant Pathology and Plant Breed- 
ing, Courses in 208 

Political Science and History, 

Courses in 174 

Poultry Husbandry, Courses in . 209 

Pre-Law Course 88 

Pre-Med Course 91 

Pre-Med Technology 92 

Private Board and Lodging . . 56 
Professional Fraternities .... 68 

Psychology, Courses in 210 

Publications 33 

—Student 67 

Public Administration 36 

Quality Points 77 

Quarter System 33 



Page 

Refunds of Fees 54 

Regents, Board of 4 

Registration Information 

— Changes in 81 

— Procedure 49 

Regulations Governing Students . 72 

— Administrative 72 

— Scholastic 73 

Religious Activities 68 

Reports 78 

Requirements for Graduation . . 77 
Requirements for Major Concen- 
tration for Bachelor of Arts 
and Bachelor of Science De- 
grees 85 

Residence Requirements .... 47 

Resident Students 52 

Romance Languages, Courses in 213 

Room and Board 57 

— Refunds 54 

Rural Sociology, Courses in . . 127 

Schedule of Courses 82 

Schedule of Studies 49 

Scholarship and Loan Funds . . 59 
Scholarships 

— District Competitive .... 59 

— First Honor 59 

Scholastic Grades 76 

Schools and Colleges other than 

Arts and Sciences 100 

Science Survey Courses .... 216 
Self-Help, Opportunities for . . 58 
Senior Division 34 

— Program 85 

Shorthand and Typewriting, 

Courses in 149 

Social Fraternities 68 

Social Science Survey Courses . . 217 
Social Work 36 

— Courses in 217 

Societies, Honorary 68 

Debating 67 

Sociology, Courses in 218 

Spanish, Courses in 216 

Special Students 43 

Specialized or Departmental Clubs 68 

Speech, Courses in 217 

Student Assistants 28 

Student Classification 74 

Student Counselors 37 

Student Government Association. 

Women's 72 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



229 



Fage 

Student Life and Activities ... 66 

Student Publications 67 

Student Regulations 72 

Study Schedule 49 

Substitutions for Survey Courses 46 

Summer Quarter 33 

Survey Courses 

Human Biology 216 

Humanities 183 

Physical Science 217 

Social Science 217 

Testing Bureau 38 

Transfer Students 45 



Page 
— Modifications for Degree Re- 
quirements for 86 

Uniform Junior Division Program 84 

University, History of 31 

"Vocational Education, Courses in 162 

Voluntary Religious Association . 68 

Withdrawals from University . . 72 

Women at the University .... 38 

Student Government Association 72 

Women's Dormitories 55 

Women's Student Government 

Association 72 

Zoology, Courses in 223 



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